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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi All,

Any idea what these grips might have been made for. Measure 2 3/4"high and 1 1/4" wide at the base. Frame appears to be about 3/8" wide.





Gizamo
 

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Re: Solid Bone Grip ? and help identify, with pics

Looks like they came off the gun that Fred Flintstone used to shoot Mr Slate in the first movie. /forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif Jus' Jokin'

Since they were made as a one piece design and they are not screwed together, could they have been some type of grip sample ?
It looks to be some type of single action revolver, but if the guns frame was not made of rubber, you would never be able to mount the grip.
Or, were they made like that to make a bookmatched set and when the maker got this far they realized that there were to many imperfections and scrapped the set before putting more time into the project ?
Just a thought.

Jeff (GUNKWAZY)
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Re: Solid Bone Grip ? and help identify, with pics

I just learned that this grip is appropriate to a SAA style gun. The saa grip frame unscrews from frame, trigger guard assembly. At least I believe this to be correct. Any of the older style gun collectors know about this?

Gizamo
 

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Re: Solid Bone Grip ? and help identify, with pics

Other than A Colt Walker or Whitneyville-Walker Dragoon wherein the frame was inletted for the top of the grip, Colt revolver frames were squared off at the rear. Given the way that the top of your grips slant rearward, or at least appear to, I doubt that they were for a Colt. If you could post a picture of the grips standing straight, it would be easier to tell.
 

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Re: Solid Bone Grip ? and help identify, with pics

One piece grips do not have a screw, otherwise they would be two piece grips. Colt one piece grips are installed by removing the trigger guard assembly, backstrap, and mainspring and then installing them around the one piece grip. Then the whole assembly is screwed back into the frame.


[ QUOTE ]
Looks like they came off the gun that Fred Flintstone used to shoot Mr Slate in the first movie. /forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif Jus' Jokin'

Since they were made as a one piece design and they are not screwed together, could they have been some type of grip sample ?
It looks to be some type of single action revolver, but if the guns frame was not made of rubber, you would never be able to mount the grip.
Or, were they made like that to make a bookmatched set and when the maker got this far they realized that there were to many imperfections and scrapped the set before putting more time into the project ?
Just a thought.

Jeff (GUNKWAZY)

[/ QUOTE ]
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Re: Solid Bone Grip ? and help identify, with pics

Hi Thiokol,

Hope these pics are a little better. Do you think they are ivory, whale or elephant?







Gizamo
 

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Re: Solid Bone Grip ? and help identify, with pics

Judging from the added pictures, I think that these grips are for a percussion revolver as they appear to be out of proportion for an SAA type of revolver. They seem to be too tall. Having said that, my guess is that they are probably for one of the Belgian copies that were being produced at the same time that Colt was manufacturing their percussion revolvers. I have seen a few Belgian copies from that era where the frames were shaped similarly to your grips. I also believe that they are elephant ivory.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Re: Solid Bone Grip ? and help identify, with pics

Thiokol,

Really thank you for the thought you've given this. The grips measure 2 3/4" High and 1 3/16" at the bottom. Here is a better picture of the top. Any idea of value on these type of grips?



Gizamo
 

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I don't believe your grips are elephant ivory, the striation and growth patterns are not those of an elephant tusk. Tusks develop and grow similarly to human teeth and have a single central canal containing the nerve and blood vessels. The canal obliterates itself with advancing age from the tip back towards the socket in the jaw bone, that is why the cut end of tusks appears somewhat hollow and tapering, depending on how far back the tusk was cut off.

Your grip appears to have "knots" and irregular growth lines, probably made from a piece of jawbone or some other large animal bone, as a pelvis or femur.
.
tommix (retired dentist)
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Wow tommix,

Know that is what I called an informed opinion /forums/images/graemlins/cool.gif
Thanks for the reply, I learn something new everyday....
Wish someone could solidly identify the grips, but I know that is just not possible without having them in hand.

Gizamo
 

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With all due respect to the retired doc, while it may be an informed opinion, he is incorrect. There are plenty of folks more knowledgable than he and I who have responded on the S&W forum that they are, indeed, elephant ivory, and have explained why.
 

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Thiokol may be right, the base of the grips does have an ivory pattern, but that sworl pattern near the front strap area on both sides is unlike any elephant ivory tusk I have seen. They are straight without any cusps the entire length. Maybe from a large whale tooth or some other sea creature. Of course I really don't know, it was just an opinion. The S&W Forum opinions are not definitive, all bones are not hollow, marrow filled items, older human and animal bones can have a significant thickness of outer compact bone. Anyway it is fun to exchange thoughts....
tommix
 
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