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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am currently looking for a nice specimen of either the Colt Peacemaker .22 or a Frontier Scout. It all started with me wanting a single action revolver in .22 and the first obvious choice was to look for a Ruger Single Six revolver. There are plenty of used and inexpensive Rugers for sale where I live (Norway) but after getting a copy of Don Wilkerson´s great book "Colt Scouts, Peacemakers and New Frontiers in 22 Caliber" I discovered the Colt as a potential alternative to a Single Six.
To be clear I am primarily not searching for a collector´s item but a gun which I can enjoy at the range. A decent specimen of a Frontier Scout will do the trick for me even though I would buy a Peacemaker .22 in an instant. unfortunately Peacemakers are not very common in Norway if you discount the commemoratives being put up for sale from time to time in my little corner of the world. I therefore think that a Frontier Scout might be a good alternative to a Ruger and I would like to hear from fellow members who owns and uses Frontier Scouts or Peacemakers in .22. Are they only collectables which should be treated as such or are they guns which also can withstand some use and be enjoyed at the range? What do you think? I surely will appreciate any input from you members on this topic.
 

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The Peacemaker is more of a collectible than the Frontier Scout so you are on the right path for a shooter.

I like the early Duotone Frontier Scouts from the 1950’s.

Member ‘Buckspen’ is an expert on these. Perhaps he will chime in or you could read his posts in the archives.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thank you for your reply. I just found some of the posts you refer to, "Buckspen" seem to know very much about these guns, thank you for your advice in that regard. I like all of the variants of the Frontier Scout, the last item for sale where I live was a Frontier Scout 62 with dual cylinders in a fair to good shape. It seems like commemorative Colts are more common in the for sale ads here in the North.
 

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All things being equal - keep looking for the steel-framed 'Peacemaker' or the 'New Frontier' for a piece that's pleasing to the eye and has a better 'feel' than the lighter, aluminum-framed 'Frontier Scout.
 

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I used to prefer the steel frame peacemaker and New frontiers over the earlier scouts, now I like them all. The scout 62 with its zinc alloy frame feels about like the same weight as a steel frame and is nicely balanced. I really like the imitation stag stocks on it as well. I wouldn’t pass on that 62” if it’s in your price range. With that said and owning all the barrel lengths of these, I like the 6” best. On the scouts, I believe this length was only offered on some commemorative guns. I have a shooter grade golden spike scout 6” that is a tac driver, I later added a NF 6”. For almost everyone who owns one of these with a 22 mag. cylinder, it’s something that is rarely used but still nice to have.

i just added a late 50’s ruger single six to my collection as when I was a kid in the 60’s, it was the first handgun I shot that my dad owned. In my small hands the colt fits better as the ruger feels just a slight bit bigger and heavier. I would have to believe that is why colt made the heavier 62” and then the steel frame to acquire the shooters who felt the heavier gun was a better gun.
 

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I will try to address the durability question. I have a 1959 vintage Scout (an F), that I traded for in in about 1965 or 1966. I am it's second owner. It has been carried a million miles on my hip while quail hunting to shoot sitting rabbits and, occasionally, a sitting quail. It's had thousands of rounds through it, with never a misfire. All it's ever seen is cleaning and oiling. It shoots as good today as it did 50 years ago.

BTW, welcome to the forum!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks Phylllis1, that is just what I wanted to hear! If I get my hands on a Colt .22 it will be put to use.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
The problem with the Peacemaker in .22 is to find one where I live. I do find the Peacemaker to be more aesthetically pleasing than the Scouts to tell you the truth. Most G framed guns turning up here are commemoratives as previously stated. The 62 I mentioned was sold before I got the chance to act on it. I do also like the 6" barrel length, I got to inspect a fellow shooter´s Peacemaker .22 with this length of barrel, what a beatiful gun it was! He will never sell it though, he got is a heirloom from his father.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
The funniest thing just happened: A 2nd Amendment .22 just appeared for sale where I live. As many of you probably know this gun was made on a G frame in 1977, 3 020 were manufactured. The seller have not provided much info about the gun - at least so far.
 

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As a shooter, I would prefer a New Frontier .22 with the two cylinders for the adjustable sights and ability to fire anything from .22 BB/CB caps to .22 Magnum. I have also admired the 2nd Amendment Peacemaker .22s, as that gun was never offered in standard production with the nickel finish. I have come very close to buying one of those several times.
I would not rule out a commemorative G framed gun as a shooter. They are just as well made as the standard production guns. Just be aware that if you buy one in mint condition, you will instantly devalue it somewhat by shooting it. Commemorative guns can be a very good buy if in slightly used condition.
The Frontier Scouts are also good guns and there are many collectible variations. The aluminum frame Scouts (F and Q serial numbers) make great trail guns as they are very light compared to the others.
There is one caution for the alloy frame Scouts. I would not make a habit of shooting .22 Magnum cartridges in these guns even though many were chambered for it. The alloy frames (aluminum for Q and F and Zamac for P and K) do not stand up to the pressure of the .22 Magnum as well as the steel frames of the Peacemaker .22 and New Frontier .22 revolvers.

- - - Buckspen
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I am about to make a deal on the above-mentioned 2nd Amendment commemorative gun. The seller is a collector who is selling most of his firearms because he is about to retire and move to another country. The gun is in a slightly used condition so I will follow Buckspen´s advice. Thank you all for helping me with this!
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I just picked up the gun I bought a few hours ago. I will test it at the local range as soon as possible and give you my impression of the gun. It surely looks nice:).
 

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Carried a Q series for many years whether hunting or metal detecting, and shot many thousands of rounds through it. Just the right weight for a .22 revolver, and shot exactly to point of aim. I only got rid of it when I bought a S&W air weight kit gun which was even smaller and lighter.
 

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Why only own one of these great, little guns? :D. MAM´s guns proves my point.
I started out only wanting one but then found out how really affordable they are and jumped in. They are all going to go to the grandkids sooner than later so for 300-400 buck a pot why not acquire more than one......at least that has been my method.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
WP_20180210_11_43_33_Pro.jpg WP_20180217_22_02_23_Pro.jpg I have already managed to shoot 2 -300 rounds through my Colt since I got it roughly a month ago. I am really impressed by this single action revolver. Not is it only pretty to look at, it is also extremely enjoyable to use at the local range. I must admit I get a kick out of showing other shooters how such a firearm works, most people at the range use either modern revolvers or semi-auto pistols and get somewhat bewildered at first at the operation of such a gun compared to more modern designs. I am into older guns, the Colt should go nicely with my Winchester 9422 made in 1976.
I shoot my Colt standing with no rest at a distance of 25 meters/27 yards, I am happy to say it shoots well and I am doing better than I hoped with this beautiful Peacemaker .22.
 

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Good for you and congratulations on a fine colt that will last a lifetime. My very first colt was a 22 peacemaker bought new in 1977 ( my dad had to buy it as I was 16 years old). 1000’s of rounds fired. The only thing that ever went wrong was a broken hand/handspring after many rounds. I probably played ( cocking the gun as I liked to hear the 4 clicks) with the gun as much as I shot it. I am still keeping my eyes open for a gun just like yours.
 
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