Colt Forum banner

1 - 20 of 23 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
683 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hey there. A co-worker showed me some family long guns that he had and is looking for more information about. He is 2 generations removed from any interest in firearms so he was also thinking about ballpark pricing if he were to sell them. I was able to somewhat identify this stuff but have almost no knowledge of the details of these models...

Winchester Model 71 (SN 12,xxx), if my research is correct, it dates to 1937. A quick GB search suggests this one could be worth some dough based on current asking prices. It's in decent shape overall, but has some muzzle wear.

Sporterized 1903 Springfield- (SN 636,xxx- looks like 1917) The stock looks funky- not sure what's going on with the hole in front of the bolt, almost looks like it belongs to a completely different style of rifle but that slope in front of the scope (Weaver model 330) looks like other 1903s. It looks like if I could find a surplus stock the only other issue is the front site. The action was BUTTERY smooth. Any ideas on this package?

Browning A5, 16 Gauge. No idea what the SN is on this one. A lot of typical FN Belgian markings but nothing that meant anything to me. It had two barrels with it. I didn't have a tape measure but my iPhone measuring app showed that the loose barrel is 28.5" from muzzle to the opposite end.

Lastly, a single shot 16 Gauge Eastern Arms, again, unsure about SN on this one. Google search seems to suggest that this was a Sears brand, made by one of a number of different manufacturers (Winchester, Savage, etc.). No clue what this one is.

Here are some photos. I apologize for the quality.

Thanks in advance. I may be interested in one or two.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,262 Posts
Interesting 03A3 or is it an A4? Hard to price need more pictures of this one. Stock was cut for a receiver sight, but I do not see holes in the receiver. very desirable Weaver scope

The Model 71 is relatively easy to price, early carbine Deluxe with bolt sight, $3,000 if condition is as good as it appears, maybe a bit more.

Early A5 with extra barrel assembly. This one looks goo also, My guesstimate is more then $1,000, but not quite $2,000. but this is an early A5 with the safety in front of the trigger guard.

The Eastern Arms is just another generic single shot, $100 maybe.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,463 Posts
I love 71s. That 71 has some potential but pics make it difficult to tell value. It has the bolt peep and a 37 should be long tang, which are considered more valuable. Appears to have the correct sling mounts and pistol grip cap. Hard to tell in photos but the finish on the buttstock doesn't look right, again this could just be the photo. Also does it have a hotplate? It appears in the photo it is either missing or has a chipped toe? If she's all there and legit 3500 wouldn't be out of line.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,340 Posts
That's a 1903...not an '03A3...and a low number one at that. The front sight base is still present, the finger groove stock and straight down bolt handle which was low number only. With the switch to the double heat treatment the bolts became swept back slightly. I don't know the quality of the work done but it's a shame the stock was modified the way it was.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
282 Posts
You can't get a single shot shotgun that is in decent condition for under a hundred bucks that is still shootable anymore these days . As for the auto 5 , last few gun shows I went to the Belgiums asking price was in between 6 and 8 hundred for a decent one . That extra barrel is a whole different Ball game pending on what it is . I can't really tell by the pictures.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,299 Posts
The 1903 Springfield has a single heat treatment receiver, which are known to be brittle. Any 1903 Springfield receiver under serial number 800,000 is single heat treatment. Some are more brittle than others, but there is no way of knowing which is which. Chances of the receiver failing is low, but the possibility is there. The modifications take it out of the collectible class.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
282 Posts
Yep, I've been watching Auto-5s for a few years, they're way down. Not many people duck hunting anymore.
I used to collect them ,one of John Browning's finest in my opinion. That was before Sam Colt got a hold of me. I still have two ,a 16 like the OP has pictured and my turkey Slayer. Jap made Magnum 12 .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
683 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Wow, thanks for all the information.
All of these were described to me as being farm/hunting guns owned by this gentleman's grandfather- a New Englander who bought them to use and not as collectibles.

Kingcobb- what exactly is a hotplate and a chipped toe? The finish on the wood seemed to match, it may look glossy because I rubbed it down or because it was directly under some fluorescent lights, I think. The guy's backyard was too small to take GOOD pics outside without attracting negative attention from neighbors. Didn't want to take that chance.
As Snidely mentioned, the SN on the 1903 is in the 636,000 range so the two sites I found date it at 1917. As a WWI nut, COULD I find another stock and save this one? It bears mentioning again, that this action was SMOOOOOTH- more-so than any bolt gun I've ever worked before. Maybe something's missing!

These guns have been in soft cases for, possibly years- the M71 was "difficult" to work the action- I am comparing this to the other pre-64 Winchester lever guns I've handled. The mechanism that pops out the bottom when the breech is open felt dry- all I had was a bottle of Ballistol and a rag so I wiped all of them down before replacing them in their cases. I ran some ballistol on my finger around on the surfaces that pop out of the bottom and it felt a little better.

As for the A5- the barrel that is installed appears to be a few inches longer than the extra one.

I didn't figure the Eastern Arms was worth much, but I have an old .410 SXS that IS worth a little more than it should be only because it's not the standard 12 gauge. I wondered the same about this one. It is certainly the one that looks the most worn of the quartet.

Thanks again. This is exactly what I am looking for- ballpark figures- stuff like "any functioning N frame S&W is worth $500," type of information. I wonder if the easy thing for him to do is consign them. I really don't know how that end of the business works.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,299 Posts
Part of the smoothness of the Model 1903 rifle comes from the very hard receiver and bolt, which was also the cause the failures. In 1918 the single heat treatment was changed to a double heat treatment which left the core of the receiver softer for added strength, but still hardened the surface of the receiver. With the change to nickel steel the action was not nearly so smooth.

It would cost several dollars to restore the rifle, and it would still have the extra screw holes for the scope mount. The area where it was drilled and tapped would have required annealing to get it soft enough to drill and tap.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,463 Posts
My apologies. Hotplate was supposed to be buttplate as in on the butt of the stock. I believe it should have a metal buttplate....but in the pick it looks like it is missing the toe -the bottom of the buttplate at the bottom of the stock.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,463 Posts
Also if the action was stiff. Just hose it down with rem oil or some such and wipe it dry. My 71s make my 73s, 92s, 94s, and 86s seem sluggish. It should be the smoothest action in the bunch. Especially as a prewar longtang model.

Also, what is the barrel length? If it is a 20 inch carbine that 3500 figure just got low. I think it's a rifle based off the pic but want to ask.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
683 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
King,
Are you saying that the carbine is more desirable? Here is a photo from a Winchester book I have (copyrighted in 1952, hence the note that it is still in the line). This barrel looks noticeably longer than the one in my original photo.
It seems I need to take a closer look at this one. I will go back sometime soon and get better photos. Anything in particular to get shots of?
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,064 Posts
The 1903 has a Weaver 33 scope on it which is worth 300 to 500 as the correct scope with the click detents on the adjustment screws for a 03-A4 Sniper Rifle. The mount is a Stith witch is not correct but still has a little value. The stock and handguard are cut so the value goes down. The receiver if below 800,000 is not worth as much as it would be if over the 800,000 number. AS a gun the value would be maybe 400. As parts it could be worth 700 to 900 depending on the year of the barrel and condition. Often the barrel and receiver do not match.

The Browning is the same story. The parts are worth more then the gun as a whole. The 2 solid rib barrels would bring in the area of 300 each and the stocks 200 to 300. As a gun it is the 300 to 400 dollar ranges as no one is using these today and the values have plummeted. The collector interest in them is good but nothing like a Winchester or Colt.

The Eastern Arms is a minimal value gun especially since it is an off brand.

The Winchester needs a proper evaluation to be appraised. As you can opinions vary and the condition and correctness are everything on a collectible Winchester.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,463 Posts
Yes. A carbine in good condition could be a 4-5k gun to the right person as long as its factory. I personally prefer the rifles, but carbines are a lot rarer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,299 Posts
Unless the Weaver 330 scope has military markings, it does not have the value of an original M73B1 marked scope. The first scopes used on the 03-A4 rifles were off the shelf Weaver 330-C, but were electro penciled with :

TELESCOPE M73B1
SERIAL NUMBER XXXX

Later into production the M73B1 was stamped on the adjustment plate, SERIAL NO. stamped on the tube under the adjustment plate, followed by an electro penciled serial number.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,199 Posts
That's what I thought too. When someone posted that a regular Weaver 330 scope was worth $300-500, for a minute I thought I should go get mine out that I researched as "not valuable" 3-4 years ago. But times change, and the internet causes a lot of things to become "Flash Mob" popular. So I looked on ebay. Nope, regular 330s are a cheap as ever. I tried mine on a .22 for a while, but took it off for a better model. Same as the Army snipers reported in WWII, it was not very good, but all they had.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
683 Posts
Discussion Starter #20
Thanks for all of the info. I think I'm going to try to find a local appraisal service for this owner- sounds like a lot of variables that could affect value in a big way, on the Winchester anyway. Maybe I'll make him an offer on the Auto5- another Browning design in the safe never hurts, and it's shameful that I don't own anything from FN.

Any advice on finding a reputable appraisal service in Connecticut?
 
1 - 20 of 23 Posts
Top