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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know that some members here are interested in older guns, so I thought I’d show a couple I just picked up at the TMCA show in Cool Springs.


The Webley Mk II had me totally confused, the seller didn’t know what it was and I didn’t either. First I thought it was some kind of “tanker” model with shortened grip frame, but after some internet research I found that it’s a legit .32 cal. pocket model that was mainly sold in India and rarely found in the US. If Indiana Jones carried a pocket gun, it would probably have been one of these.


The other one is a Rast & Gasser M1898. It has a hinged side plate that you can open by pushing on the trigger guard, and after examining the lock work I found that it’s actually very similar to the Colt V-springs. Another neat feature is the loading system: Swinging the loading gate open will disengage the hammer, so you can turn the cylinder one chamber at a time by simply pulling the trigger.
 

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Nice finds. Some very innovative ideas and engineering there.
 
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I like the Rast & Gasser revolver. They are just a unique looking pistol. I always thought the grip design wold be uncomfortable, but actually they are not. The Action does resemble a Colt! Both revolvers are great finds!
 

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A couple of cool old guns from Cool Springs there Olle. The feature that you describe on your Rast & Gasser that allows the cylinder to rotate for loading and unloading without the hammer moving is called the Abadie system, after the designer. The Swiss M1892 and M1929 also have it as well as a few other guns from that era. It makes for a much faster loading & unloading than you would have with an SAA for example but still not as fast as a swing out or top break revolver.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
A couple of cool old guns from Cool Springs there Olle. The feature that you describe on your Rast & Gasser that allows the cylinder to rotate for loading and unloading without the hammer moving is called the Abadie system, after the designer. The Swiss M1892 and M1929 also have it as well as a few other guns from that era. It makes for a much faster loading & unloading than you would have with an SAA for example but still not as fast as a swing out or top break revolver.
I have never heard of this system before, you sure learn something new every day! :cool: I just took it apart for thorough cleaning, and you can do an almost complete detail strip without any tools at all. It's obviously made to be disassembled very easily, so I figure it was part of the soldier's routine maintenance to take it apart entirely and clean it. It reminds me of the Swedish Model 1887, the internal parts in those are even marked with letters to show the order of reassembly.
 

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My Swiss Model 1892 also has all the internal parts numbered with a single digit in order of their disassembly sequence, in addition to the serial number. They are simple and robust revolvers although the 7.5mm caliber is pretty anemic. It's a .30 cal bullet of about 100 grains doing about 720 fps.
 

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I know that some members here are interested in older guns, so I thought I’d show a couple I just picked up at the TMCA show in Cool Springs.


The Webley Mk II had me totally confused, the seller didn’t know what it was and I didn’t either. First I thought it was some kind of “tanker” model with shortened grip frame, but after some internet research I found that it’s a legit .32 cal. pocket model that was mainly sold in India and rarely found in the US. If Indiana Jones carried a pocket gun, it would probably have been one of these.


The other one is a Rast & Gasser M1898. It has a hinged side plate that you can open by pushing on the trigger guard, and after examining the lock work I found that it’s actually very similar to the Colt V-springs. Another neat feature is the loading system: Swinging the loading gate open will disengage the hammer, so you can turn the cylinder one chamber at a time by simply pulling the trigger.
Olle, thanks for the time and effort to post the photos, especially the exposed mechanisms ! Really appreciate it. Neat stuff.
 

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Here is the interior of a Swiss M1882 for comparison. The little rectangular lever with checkered top near the bottom of the V spring rotates to lock the spring and part # 5, the rebound lever in place which makes disassembly & reassembly easier.
A book that I highly recommend is The Collector Guide to Military Pistol & Revolver Disassembly and Reassembly by Mowbray and Puleo. It is well illustrated with color closeups and invaluable when you come across some of the old and oddball guns out there and don't know where to begin to take them apart for a cleaning and inspection or repair.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Here is the interior of a Swiss M1882 for comparison. The little rectangular lever with checkered top near the bottom of the V spring rotates to lock the spring and part # 5, the rebound lever in place which makes disassembly & reassembly easier.
A book that I highly recommend is The Collector Guide to Military Pistol & Revolver Disassembly and Reassembly by Mowbray and Puleo. It is well illustrated with color closeups and invaluable when you come across some of the old and oddball guns out there and don't know where to begin to take them apart for a cleaning and inspection or repair.
That looks like the same type of action, same as you find in most Nagant style revolvers. It seems like the numbers are reversed and actually shows the order of disassembly (ie: not the assembly), and that might be the way they did the letters in the Swedish 1887 as well. I guess I have to take it apart and look again.

The book is really good, bought it many years ago and it's full of good info. All the color pictures makes it a great a coffee table book as well. It does lack a little bit when it comes to the more advanced disassembly of some guns (like the Roth-Steyr 1907), but one can always improvise. This is as far as I got last time, but I might try a total detail strip next time. No guts, no glory. :D
 

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I saw those and was discussing them with my son. Actually he noticed the Webley. Thank you for giving me a little more information. I didn't ask the sellers about them.

Scott
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I saw those and was discussing them with my son. Actually he noticed the Webley. Thank you for giving me a little more information. I didn't ask the sellers about them.

Scott
The guy who had the Webley didn't know much more about it than I did, and I traded for a Femaru P.37 I had brought. I don't know who came out on top of that one, but that wasn't really the purpose of the exercise either. We trade just for fun now and then, just to rotate inventory, check out guns we haven't had before, practice our haggling skills and so on. The TMCA show is pretty relaxed, and many of the members enjoy trading just for the sake of trading. Now I have a gun I have never even seen before, so I really don't care if I won or lost. :cool:
 
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