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It's been setting on my mag pile for over a week but tonight I opened the Dec/Jan copy of G&A Handguns magazine . On pages 10&11 is an article on the PPT 22LR with the test gun being a 1927 mfg gun .
Don't see much in print these days on the pre-War classics .
 

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Found a Copy of the Guns & Ammo Handgun Article today and found it to be very interesting. I wish more articles were published regarding older handguns. This one was well done and made me take out mine for a comparison. The article shows an earlier small grip version (Model G) although the author stated his was made in 1927 even though the model C started in 1925. I also noticed his hammer was blued and not polished bright like my c1933 Model C?. Additional features of the Model C include checkered Trigger and Backstrap, with the top of the frame stippled to reduce glare and also includes the embedded head cylinder introduced n 1931. Although the custom grips on my PPT are not Roper or Sanderson, they exhibit Colt characteristics such as Colt Medallions mounted with the 3 holes pattern and similar bezel and mounting screw. While looking up the PPT in the Book of Colt Firearms, saw an illustration of a rare HEAVY BARREL version, did not know they existed! All in all a good article about one my favorite Colts.
 

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Thanks Mitch for the tip on this article. I picked up a copy of the magazine and read the article since I have a PPT .22 that looks much like the one in the article. Mine is a 1941 model C and was one of the last made. It has the checkered trigger and backstrap. The author's observations certainly match my own as this is a very well made elegant revolver. I love the single action feel but for me the double action is not as smooth as my Detective Special. It's a shame the craftsmanship of these older revolvers is not available today but virtually all products today would not be affordable with the amount of hands on labor used in products of that era. Thanks again for the original post. Steve
 
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