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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well I finally found one NIB and got it this past Thursday. Went to the range on Saturday and put 150 flawless rounds down it. The trigger is unbelievable... If you breath hard is goes bang. Awesome gun.
Then I brought it home to clean it and I can't believe it but me being an idiot I scratched it. I am sick over it. I know it is a tool and I should get over it but a gun over $2000 and I scratch it the first time cleaning it. I then try to touch it up with a blue pen by Birchwood Casey and I have made it worse...
So..the only way to fix it is have Colt refinish the frame or can they do that one spot?
Any help/input is appreciated...and I have called myself an idiot about 1000 times since Saturday so a couple more from you fine folks will help the sting even more I guess
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
That's the thing...I am not going to carry it. It is for the nightstand. I wanted the carry model because of the night sights. Am I looking at a complete refinish or can they do the spot?
 

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Well you may as well carry it now, all the future collector value is gone. Shoot it and enjoy it in good health!
 

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Looks like you made it wider maybe trying to fix it. Those are commonly known as "idiot marks" but I'm only saying that in a friendly kind of way. :rolleyes:

You could have the frame redone, but I bet if you experimented with some different cold blues, you could make it look better.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Yes...I have totally screwed this up. So am I looking at a total refinish by the look of it? If so, will it look like new? Can Colt just fix the spot or do they need to do the whole frame? And for whatever they do, will it be like it was NIB
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks Chaosrob...I just want to get it back to the way it was last week so it is really nice again. I am sick over it
 

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I understand man, but it is a pistol. Buy another to keep lnib and use this one as a shooter, you would probably get a lot more satisfaction out of it. The only thing I count the bumps and bruises on that I own anymore is my retirement account when people show pictures of nice guns that I will now need to try to find
 

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Forget about it. Shoot it. If you have it refinished it will only get dinged/scratched/scraped etc. again and your heartache will only be worse. Use breeds character.
 

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Well ColtDale, No they can't re-blue one little spot, so the least you can do is have the frame re-finished.I say, "Get over it,good men have been making that same "mistake" for more than 100 years now." Try a little Oxpho Blue from Brownells it will cover better.Birchwood is OK but it doesn't cover as well as a number of other products. Next time use a strip of old credit card to hold the detent pin back while removing the slide stop.Just my Not S H Opinion. Nick
 

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I'm not familiar with your expertise, or lack of, breaking down a 1911 platformed pistol but you've managed to acquire a takedown scratch or some people call it "the idiot scratch". Then you tried to "fix" the blemish and made it worse. Your first mistake was not being careful or knowing exactly how to reassemble the pistol correctly so as to avoid the scratch from the slide stop lever. There are numerous videos on You Tube on how to properly disassemble and reassemble your pistol, look at them and learn. Now, you are making the scratch worse by messing with it as it looks like you took an abrasive or other medium and widened the area that was scratched. You have 2 choices, live with your mistake and try a cold blue in that area to at least camouflage the scratch or send the frame to Colt to have them make it like new. The second option will mean you will be without your pistol for quite some time and you'll end up a few hundred or more dollars poorer. The final choice is to leave it as is and carry and shoot the gun as intended, you can't undo what you've done so might as well shoot the heck out of it. Maybe a few years down the road you can have a custom refinish done by a company that won't have your weapon for a year or so......
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
[QUOTEleswad;495441]I am looking for that gun to carry, so sell it to me:)[/QUOTE]

Maybe I will do just that
 

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MtnSpur, I've shot dozens and dozens, if not more than a hundred government owned M1911s made in my grandfather's day that are still running perfectly thanks to the master military armorers who service them. For a pistol that is designed to be broken down, cleaned, and then reassembled in the field, under less than ideal, workshop conditions, I am not at all sure that what you seem to call the "correct" way of doing it is "correct" at all. In fact, I cannot recall ever shooting one that did not have a takedown GROOVE in it, and I would be willing to bet that old Mr. Browning would laugh in your face if you tried to tell him that you needed a strip of plastic or any sort of special something to "correctly" reassemble his pistol. Certainly the men who keep those pistols running perfectly after all this time would probably just look at you if you tried to call them idiots and tell them how to "correctly" reassemble an M1911. I wonder if you've ever had to reassemble one blindfolded? I doubt it, because you might be forced to do it "incorrectly".Certainly I prefer not to scratch my expensive investments, but if I am going to carry and shoot it, then it's a shooter. I'll avoid but not dread a takedown scratch. I don't shoot bullseyes with every shot, and when reasembling a pistol for the 200th time odds are it will eventually get scratched. It is the nature of the design, and I do not consider it a flaw. I feel for ColtDale scratching it on the first go, but doo doo occures. If it's a collectors piece I'm not going to shoot it, there's no need to field strip it, and the whole thing is moot.
 

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MtnSpur, I've shot dozens and dozens, if not more than a hundred government owned M1911s made in my grandfather's day that are still running perfectly thanks to the master military armorers who service them. For a pistol that is designed to be broken down, cleaned, and then reassembled in the field, under less than ideal, workshop conditions, I am not at all sure that what you seem to call the "correct" way of doing it is "correct" at all. In fact, I cannot recall ever shooting one that did not have a takedown GROOVE in it, and I would be willing to bet that old Mr. Browning would laugh in your face if you tried to tell him that you needed a strip of plastic or any sort of special something to "correctly" reassemble his pistol. Certainly the men who keep those pistols running perfectly after all this time would probably just look at you if you tried to call them idiots and tell them how to "correctly" reassemble an M1911. I wonder if you've ever had to reassemble one blindfolded? I doubt it, because you might be forced to do it "incorrectly".Certainly I prefer not to scratch my expensive investments, but if I am going to carry and shoot it, then it's a shooter. I'll avoid but not dread a takedown scratch. I don't shoot bullseyes with every shot, and when reasembling a pistol for the 200th time odds are it will eventually get scratched. It is the nature of the design, and I do not consider it a flaw. I feel for ColtDale scratching it on the first go, but doo doo occures. If it's a collectors piece I'm not going to shoot it, there's no need to field strip it, and the whole thing is moot.
Exactly where did I say ColtDale needed a special tool or plastic strip to correctly reassemble the pistol? I said to look at You Tube (as it shows a variety of ways to avoid a takedown scratch). Don't assume something I never said. I feel for anyone who scratches a brand new pistol , especially an expensive one but the takedown scratch can be avoided and I'm not talking about breaking down the weapon under fire, blindfolded or in a timed event. Yep, poop happens but don't sugarcoat it after the fact. I've put takedown scratches on 2 1911's I owned so I'm not the perfect armorer but I learned how to keep from repeating that mistake. There is a right and wrong way to reassemble a 1911 platformed semi auto and I'm not discussing collector pieces but your every day carry. I can't claim to have shot hundreds of 1911's but I took down my first M1 and 1911 in 1964 under the watchful eye of an ex drill instructor Army MSgt in military school who was almost as hard on us younguns as the drill instructors I encountered that worked for Uncle Sam when I served my country beginning in 1970.
 

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That post didn't leave the acidy taste your first one did. He's obviously upset about it. If that's just "not sugar coating", I'd hate to see you actually gloat about someone else's mistake.
 
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