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Discussion Starter · #41 ·
I have newer Colts, I have USA made USFAs, and I have a Standard. I find my Standard gun to be on par with my USFA guns and better than new production Colt guns. YMMV but I think they're great guns in every way.
Hopefully it’s an easy fix for my problem and won’t have any other issues. Really want to take that thing out
 

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Discussion Starter · #44 ·
Welcome to the COLT Forum from the Cradle Of Liberty...Pennsylvania !!



Enjoy Our Community Sir...& keep us in the loop in regards to completed repairs to your Standard Mfg single action.
I just got it back today. Just over a week. It was the handspring. They fixed it no questions asked. Did not charge me for the shipping back or the labor. Seems to be working great. Going to take it out this weekend and shoot. Not expecting any more issues. Fingers crossed
 

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That's good you got a new hand spring or the complete new hand assembly. Did you every look inside the hand channel to see what the surface finish looks like, I never seen a Standard revolver just the Colt's and all my 3rd gen
have a surface finish of about a 60 grade sandpaper. As this is a built in malfunction for the hand spring to wear out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #46 ·
That's good you got a new hand spring or the complete new hand assembly. Did you every look inside the hand channel to see what the surface finish looks like, I never seen a Standard revolver just the Colt's and all my 3rd gen
have a surface finish of about a 60 grade sandpaper. As this is a built in malfunction for the hand spring to wear out.
I did not open it up. It failed after nothing but cocking the hammer a couple dozen times. So I’m sure the initial one was faulty in some way. Only minor complaint is that the screws are not all aligned north south like they were when new. Will take it out and shoot it this weekend for the first time. Really hoping no further issues arise
 

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Only minor complaint is that the screws are not all aligned north south like they were when new.
They make such a big deal about "clocking" the screws I am surprised they didn't make sure they were straight.

I would have bought a Standard, but their reputation is sub-par to the old USFA. It's a stark reminder that if USFA had a breadth of products like Standard does, they would still be in business. I am sure they are a fine gun, and you can find them regularly NIB. Only way to buy a new Colt is to pay a premium over MSRP - especially if you want a specific barrel length.

I think Standard's SAA is the main reason USFA's went stratospheric. Used ones lingered for under $1k for a LONG time. Now it's an odd thing to find a plane-Jane Rodeo for much less than $1,500 and a well-adorned Colt-spec'd gun made with all USA parts and Colt cylinder window is well ahead of what you can buy a NIB Standard for.

For my part, I wish Colt and Standard would get together and make a gun same way Colt Second Generation Blackpowders used to be. Colt could let Standard have access to the contract for forged frames, Standard could make the gun to Colt first-gen specifications, mark the gun with all Colt markings, and send them to Colt for inspection and sales. That way they would still be all USA made, have proper first gen specs and CCH hammer, AND proper prancing Pony marks (which CZ kicked off the Colt sign anyways). I have a feeling hubris on Standard and short-sightedness on Colt's part would prevent any cooperation to make the gun everyone wants right now. They are all just beating around the bush.
 

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USFA made a few (three total I thnk) "Colt" guns as samples. Colt wasn't interested in a partnership.

Now it's an odd thing to find a plane-Jane Rodeo for much less than $1,500 and a well-adorned Colt-spec'd gun made with all USA parts and Colt cylinder window is well ahead of what you can buy a NIB Standard for.
99.9% of all the USFA guns made had Uberti sized cylinder windows and cylinders. Just as all Standard's are made and do now. Both company's production guns are based on Uberti sized specs. Colt sized USFA guns are very, very rare and demand a big premium, well past $5K for collectors.

At least two of us here on the forum, own one sample each, of the of the original USFA made Colt sized guns. They were called the "Old Armory Original". Both are 4 3/4", cross pin frame, V Notch gun, with Turnbull's charcoal blue and case colors. Caliber is 45. The "Old Army Original" was only offered in 45. Those guns are almost exactly 1000 serial numbers apart.

WWYS, aka, Ben's gun.
Guitar accessory Trigger Musical instrument accessory String instrument accessory Sleeve



What began years ago as a faithful reproduction is now more historically accurate. The Old Colt Single Action reproduced by USFA is now available for the first time in a true first-generation small frame window and true scale cylinder in the Old Armory Original.
The current run of all USFA revolvers (until the Old Armory Original) sported a larger window to accommodate the larger cylinder for the potential heavy modern cartridges cowboy action shooters can put through their favorite single actions. This new offering is different in several other ways as well. The base pin latch will “regress” to the smaller, lighter dimension of 1873, as will the front sight blade—it has become the smaller, more shapely tapered blade we see on perfect (i.e., expensive) 19th century originals. Heights made expressly for the lobbing of blackpowder shells at distance. For those using modern fast powders, the bullets will print slightly higher because the bullet gets there faster and you don’t bury the front sight with the modern higher blade dimension.
In addition, USFA will offer the Old Armory Original as a engraved platform.
The pistol is available with 4.75″, 5.5″ or 7.5″ barrels chambered in .45 LC. Serial numbers begin with any original numbered gun you wish to copy (if still available) or your special birthdate or initials and number. You can get it with a blackpowder frame or a cross-pin frame, and with hard-rubber or walnut grips. It’s finished in Old Armory Case and Armory Blue.

The rear sight notch.
The Specs
CaliberCapacityBBLOALWeight
.45 LC64.75″n/an/a
.45 LC65.5″n/an/a
.45 LC67.5″n/an/a

The USFA MSRP at the time was $2,095. More than double the price of their best and last "Pre-War" model guns.
 

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Cozmo, extremely nice gun. I knew the Colt sized guns were harder to find that the originals, but didn't realize those were that limited. What a beautiful gun, I remember reading when they were being made that they were nicer than even first gen Colts in their level of fit and finish. It's always a shame when a company finally makes what their customers ask for, then disappear/go out of business/discontinue a line/etc.
 

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Ben's Old Armory Original above. But I am sure he appreciates the compliment. They are nice guns. But they aren't as nice as the Colts from the middle years (1898 to 1913 of so) of 1st Gen guns, if my small sampling is anything to judge the guns by.
That actually is good, doesn't make me feel as bad about missing out on them. I himmed and hawwed about getting a USFA, then they were gone. The middle first gen is my favorite SAA, and my "benchmark" for the quality that a SAA.
 

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Colt or a USFA? Much as I like both. Nothing (as in nothing new) is ever going to match up to a 100+ year old gun for fit, finish and the pride of workmanship the Colt employees lavished on their products.

Not Turnbull. Not the Colt Custom Shop. Not H. Bowen. Not Standard.
 

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Colt or a USFA? Much as I like both. Nothing (as in nothing new) is ever going to match up to a 100+ year old gun for fit, finish and the pride of workmanship the Colt employees lavished on their products.

Not Turnbull. Not the Colt Custom Shop. Not H. Bowen. Not Standard.
Metallurgy and machining improved leaps and bounds from the time the Model P was introduced until it reached it's height of production. Smith and Wesson double actions took over as the "hot gun" - I have several Smith and Wessons made in the 1920's and they ooze the same attention to quality that a decade earlier Colt did. I never could warm up to a Colt double action.

I wonder how much time it took to build a Colt SAA "back in the day"?
 

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Depends on the day. Height of production on those "middle years"? I'd bet not long. In the middle of the Great Depression? I'd suspect they took the time to make them perfect when they were competing with the "modern" guns like the Smith's you mention. It would be fun to examine a few Colts that were built in the Depression era to see if that is actually true.
 

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The difference in malfunctions between today and 100-150 years ago is that today the entire world knows of a single failure within minutes. Then the circle of gossip starts. "Back then" a new spring was installed and life went back to normal. Back then, it was, "Hey, did Henry ever get that six-shooter fixed?" "Yup."
 

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I am hoping so. Was disappointed that they didn’t send me a shipping label. Had to pay $70 to have it shipped to them. Once again, will keep you posted
That’s nuts! When I shipped a Colt SAA back for warranty work they got a prepaid label out to me right away. They screwed up every other part of the repair, but they at least paid for shipping!😂
 
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