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Discussion Starter #1
So what is the reasoning behind a Bisley style?? I hate em....they look like somthing a bow legged dirty ranch hand with a handle bar moustache would carry.
They look like the got dropped in a texas summer and got bent. Waht is the pourpose?
 

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They may be a little ungainly looking compared to the SAA, but if you handle and shoot one, you'll like it. They feel good in the hand. Try one out....:)
 

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In the old days they were for killing people and today they are for people to ask questions why they were made LOL

Seriously, The town of Bisley, England was the site of major British shooting matches. In 1894 Colt made an effort to market this new revolver which was an outgrowth of the modifications urged by popular demand on the Single Action. Longer grip straps, heavier frame, a lower and wider hammer spur and full width trigger all were incorporated into this new design in 1894.
 

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I understand they are still a colt.....just they fell outa the ugly tree and hit every branch on the way down.....they make Ray Charels flinch.....I could go on....:)

I am sure they shoot better than they look, But Grizelda Henpecker in Highschool said she was good in bed too.......lol Just kidding......
 

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It doesn't have to be a Colt to have a Bisley-style grip. This is my Ruger Super Blackhawk Hunter in .45 Colt. It is quite comfortable to shoot.

HPIM1153.jpg
 

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Another unusual style of old Colt to be lusted after just for it's uniqueness.
Look at the Walker. Well proportioned, handsome sidearm, but was often used to hobble your horse in bivouac, or anchor a corner of your tent.
Colts are like women, there ain't no bad ones, just some are better than others.
 

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What was it Lucky Ned Pepper said to the little girl in True Grit... " You don't varnish your opinion" .
The Bisley is usually very much liked or very much not liked, as B C may be leaning toward that side of the fence.
They were made as a more upscale single action. If what I have read is accurate, the richer side wanted a gun made for them that was a accurate target shooter. And I agree, named after Bisley, England where shooting contests were held. They came along right at the turn of the century (I forget the exact dates).. but lets say 1900 .. so the west was won by then, but they were made until 1913 and the last one left the factory in a few years later..1916 or 1919?. (I wear a name tag for me to remember who I am). I personally am glad that many don't desire them as much, otherwise , the price would be right up there with the other 1st gens. Good condition is expensive, but they don't draw the price of the traditional cowboy SA.
 

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I personally really like the Bisley hammer. I've never shot in competition, so it may be the opposite of what is needed for the quick draw.. but I think it looks as cool as flames on a old hot rod. I've got a short barreled 45LC with super vivid case hardening and case hardened Bisley hammer. I don't want to part with it. It looks like it means business.
 

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What was it Lucky Ned Pepper said to the little girl in True Grit... " You don't varnish your opinion" .
The Bisley is usually very much liked or very much not liked, as B C may be leaning toward that side of the fence.
They were made as a more upscale single action. If what I have read is accurate, the richer side wanted a gun made for them that was a accurate target shooter. And I agree, named after Bisley, England where shooting contests were held. They came along right at the turn of the century (I forget the exact dates).. but lets say 1900 .. so the west was won by then, but they were made until 1913 and the last one left the factory in a few years later..1916 or 1919?. (I wear a name tag for me to remember who I am). I personally am glad that many don't desire them as much, otherwise , the price would be right up there with the other 1st gens. Good condition is expensive, but they don't draw the price of the traditional cowboy SA.
"You don't varnish your opinion." I read the book but didn't remember that line. I love that.
I love the look of the Bisley. When I first got one long ago i couldn'y stant it when pulling it from the holster. Forget that. Once it's in your outstretched hand THEN you see why they made them. That hammer is right there where you expect it to be consistantly and the gun doesn't slide back like a SAA. An the line of sight is lower in line with your hand. Elmer Keith's famous Number 5 combined all the qualties of the Bisley and SAA. And they also make good bottle openers.
 

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Maybe that's really why that hammer is so popular with some.. those that know about the bottle opener hammer. I like it... like that Bisley photo. What caliber? I know Colt made the most in 32-20. I have one in 38-40.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Another unusual style of old Colt to be lusted after just for it's uniqueness.
Look at the Walker. Well proportioned, handsome sidearm, but was often used to hobble your horse in bivouac, or anchor a corner of your tent.
Colts are like women, there ain't no bad ones, just some are better than others.
I love the walker, they are a good looking iron, even if it holds a tent corner down or pounds nails in a fence. Just a bisley missed my boat.....not many old revolvers do.
 

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Maybe that's really why that hammer is so popular with some.. those that know about the bottle opener hammer. I like it... like that Bisley photo. What caliber? I know Colt made the most in 32-20. I have one in 38-40.
Mine is in 32-20. There's a slight bulge in the barrel. Not noticable to the eye unless you're looking for it, but enough to get a discount on the gun. It works fine as a bottle opener but I'll never do it again. These were twist offs anyway.


 

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When someone shoots a Bisley for the first time, they then understand "why". I am guessing the reason for its demise was the use of the New Service and Officers model in competition. I suggested to a friend that wanted a 44 magnum Ruger single action to get the Bisley model and he is happy he did.
 

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So what is the reasoning behind a Bisley style??

I guess we can let Colt's catalog do the talking on the Bisley :)

This Pistol has all the simplicity of construction and all the durability of the well-known "Frontier" Revolver, while the shape of the stock, of the hammer, trigger and mainspring, has been so altered as to allow this Revolver being cocked and fired most repidly without the hand loosing its firm grasp of the stock.

And from Shooting and Fishing, February 14, 1895.

The most conspicuous change, perhaps, is the handle, it being different in shape and rather more at a right angle with the barrel. The hammer is new, it is smaller and seemingly set lower, and there is a change in the mechanism of the hammer, and the trigger has a shorter and better pull....It is understood that the change in the handle and hammer is mainly to expedite cocking the arm; this was found desirable, as much of the firing in England is by the time limit.

John Gross
 

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When someone shoots a Bisley for the first time, they then understand "why". I am guessing the reason for its demise was the use of the New Service and Officers model in competition. I suggested to a friend that wanted a 44 magnum Ruger single action to get the Bisley model and he is happy he did.
I picked up one of those 44mag Ruger Bisley's myself last year. It's tank tough.
 

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I first handlesd a clone about 6-7 years ago and loved it. Decided to build me up a Ruger with a 3.5" barrel for hunting back-up. Using an old Vaquero 45 and mounted a Bisley grip fram, hammer and trigger. Put on Hogue wood grips that seem oversized.

Handles recoil great (heavy hardcast 300 gr @ ~ 1000-1200 fps)


Since I live in Washington (one of the states where we have to pay tax on out-of-state purchases but not on even trades), I prefer to do trades rather than selling guns. I had an Anaconda up for trade. I was looking for a 7.5 inch SAA (did pick one up but that's another story) and someone offered me a 7.5 Bisley that had been refinished in 41 Colt. I reload a lot of calibers, some pretty old, so why not? That gun has become on of my favorites. I love it! My only regret is now some @#$&%* has spilled the beans on this thread and everybody will be looking for one before I get a chance to get a 4.75 barrel Bisley.



BTW: Next, I wanted a Sheriff's model SAA and ended up trading for an 1877 Lighning Sheriff's model. Tomorrow, I get a Thunderer 5.5" and next week I will be receiving an 1878 in 45 Colt. BUT I STILL DON'T HAVE A SHERIFF'S SAA. Oh well, start saving up!
 

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I like the 'Bisley' model very much, looks, balance, 'feel', everything, even though it is a little small or slightly crampy for my Hand somehow, compared to the SAA proper.

If this were back 'then', and I needed a big bore Revolver, I would have gone and got myself a Bisely Model in .44 WCF or .45 Colt...and, then, saved up for a SAA also...in that order.
 

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Having held a few I see the allure for the intended purpose, shooting. It was a tool and apparently was quite good at it. Now if you want to discuss an ugly tree with many a branch trot out that Chipasomething Rhino and tell me which you'd rather have in your hand ;) Nuff said.
 

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^^^ I will concede that point.....I would take a bisley over the Rhino Turd or a "HI-POINT" . I am know the Bisley is a fine gun, just does not look right.........And BearBio, count me out for looking for one.....:)
 

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^^^ I will concede that point.....I would take a bisley over the Rhino Turd or a "HI-POINT" . I am know the Bisley is a fine gun, just does not look right.........And BearBio, count me out for looking for one.....:)
One reason I like them is the reason you don't. The bizaar weirdness of their look. A Bisley looks like a SAA looking at itself in one of those wavy funhouse mirrors. Weird, Victorian, and homely in a nice way. The Colt bisley is like the Sarah Jessica Parker of guns. They are basically ugly to most eyes yet people are still very attracted to them.
 
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