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This just might be my favorite film fast draw scene of all time. I like it because it was the first time I saw this strange rig (Andy Anderson W&D) and that McQueen had the confidence to use a long barreled gun that he handles so well. And like Shane, I like the gun sticking out the bottom of the holster.

Anybody can draw that fast when they speed up the camera
 

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I did not realize he was so fast. Have heard about many of the others from that era. Hugh O'Brian was another one.
I read somewhere that Steve McQueen owned a Thompson submachinegun. Does anyone have a photo of him with one?
 

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"when I was 26 I was broke most of the time and drove a 1951 ford which was old and wore out when I got it."

My first car was a Studebaker station wagon with aircon- it had a hole in the floor- paid $12.00 dollars for it. lol.

"Murphy was just as good with live ammo.He was scary fast and accurate, once amazing and somewhat frighting a movie crew on a desert set between takes by drawing and shooting at cactus' and rocks with his personal Colt's. "


View attachment 703881

Here some info about one of Audie Murphy's Colts


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"The Buffalo Bill Center of the West is excited to announce that Audie Murphy’s .45 caliber Colt Model 1905 Bisley Flattop target revolver—a gift from western film legend Gary Cooper—is now on display in its Cody Firearms Museum. Dr. Jim and Marilyn Phillips of Bakersfield, California, have generously loaned the firearm to the Center for a period of one year"

"Cooper even had a mold taken so the gun would perfectly fit Murphy’s hand "
I've never been a fan of the Colt Bisley. They don't fit my hand well at all, and in fact the grip angle seems awkward, and not conducive to a quick draw. I'll take the old plow handle grip any time. The grip on Elmer Keith's Number five intrigues me, but I've never handled one. Looks like it might be about right. Lots of actors in those days were good with their six guns. Thell Reed, the late Bob Munden, who I once saw shoot at an exhibition (amazing) kinda set the standard for modern shooters. And, of course, the legendary Ed McGivern.
 

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Discussion Starter #25 (Edited)
Anybody can draw that fast when they speed up the camera
In an interview, live ammo fast draw shooter, gun coach, and maker of McQueen’s fast draw rig here, Andy Anderson was asked who the fastest guns in Hollywood were and he said, “If Steve McQueen, Ben Cooper, Peter Brown, Nick Adams, and Steve Benson (?) were shooting it out for points, it would be one hell of a shoot out. Those guys are good! Real damn good!”. And actor Ben Cooper really was, and might still be.
Also, in “Nevada Smith” McQueen shows how fast he could get a 7 1/2” Bisley out of a holster. With great coaching, his draw in the scene I posted could be done by some of us on this forum, but it might take a lot of takes like I’m sure it did with McQueen here. He had real dexterity with anything mechanical in movies. A Grease Gun, B.A.R., Springfield ‘03, Ford Mustang (he did lots of the driving in Bullitt), motorcycle, Colt 1911, etc.. Also, Yul Brynner was a super star at this point after “The King And I”. He had a real rivalry with McQueen and hated his scene stealing tricks. I doubt he would have tolerated him getting his draw speeded up.
 

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This just might be my favorite film fast draw scene of all time. I like it because it was the first time I saw this strange rig (Andy Anderson W&D) and that McQueen had the confidence to use a long barreled gun that he handles so well. And like Shane, I like the gun sticking out the bottom of the holster.

The Magnificent Seven is one of my favorite movies, as is the movie it's based on, Akira Kurosawa's "The Seven Samurai", and McQueen was very good in his role but according to interviews with cast members and other sources the reason he had that long barrel revolver was due to an ego contest between him and the top billed star of the movie, Yul Brenner.
When McQueen saw Brenner's revolver he had the prop department get him something with a longer barrel but used the original holster to make it look even bigger. Technically McQueen was far better with firearms than Brenner which apparently was another point of contention between them.
My favorite character and line from the movie though is Eli Wallach as the bandit Calvera and his comment "If God did not want them sheared, He would not have made them sheep." Classic.
Dr.Tramp............
 

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There was a lot of one-upmanship in the "Magnificent Seven".

To combat it, Brenner demanded they get him the tallest horse available to put him above everyone else.

There were and are a lot of actors fast with a gun, but Audie Murphy was not only extremely fast, he could do it with live ammo.
 

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Discussion Starter #28 (Edited)
Here’s a video about the making of ”...Seven” with interviews of some of the stars. Pretty good. First is a trailer for the movie with a very lame beginning I’m glad wasn’t in it...
 

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Arvo Ojala taught a lot of the stars on fast draw and was pretty impressive in his own right. He could draw, fire, and hit the target in one-sixth of a second, faster than the eye can blink.

"Arvo would drop a silver dollar with his gun hand (right) from belt height, then draw and hit the coin before it could fall four inches. This was using "live", or full-power ammunition, not the wax bullets and quarter-loads used today in so-called "fast draw" competitions. In another exhibition, his opponent (using blanks) would face him with his pistol out of the holster and cocked, then nod as he simultaneously fired his revolver, while Arvo would draw and fire before the opponent could get a shot off. He never lost."
 

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I did not realize he was so fast. Have heard about many of the others from that era. Hugh O'Brian was another one.
I read somewhere that Steve McQueen owned a Thompson submachinegun. Does anyone have a photo of him with one?
Well...

In the movie " Never So Few " ( MGM 1959 ) McQueen carried a 1928a1 Thompson SMG



Character Bill Ringa (Steve McQueen) carries the Thompson sub machine gun with mags taped together and stock removed.

As did a few others ( Frank Sinatra / Charles Bronson )








And, it seems, a P08 Luger in his shoulder holster...

And...on the Never So Few movie poster:



.
 

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McQueen was also a physically tough man. All the others mentioned were favorites of mine; and yes, Murphy was indeed a man among men.
 

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Discussion Starter #33 (Edited)
Well...

In the movie " Never So Few " ( MGM 1959 ) McQueen carried a 1928a1 Thompson SMG



Character Bill Ringa (Steve McQueen) carries the Thompson sub machine gun with mags taped together and stock removed.

As did a few others ( Frank Sinatra / Charles Bronson )








And, it seems, a P08 Luger in his shoulder holster...

And...on the Never So Few movie poster:



.
In the black & white war movie “Hell Is For Heroes” McQueen again played the silent loner guy and his M3 Grease Gun also had two mags taped together. I thought it was the coolest thing as a kid and ever since the lowly sheet metal M3 is my favorite WW2 gun of all time, from any country. Oh. And Lee Marvin in “The Dirty Dozen” sealed the deal for me.
 

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Yes Sir... M3 Submachine Gun...General Motors Guide Lamp Division.





.The Thompson was too heavy and costly...but the stamped sheet metal construction of the Grease Gun was a whole lot lighter at 8.5 lbs empty and only cost about $15 to produce in 1943 ( equivalent to $222 in 2019 USD )

.The later M3a1 version came in around 7.95 lbs empty...

.
 
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