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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I took my 2nd Gen (1956) SAA out shooting for the first time the other day. What a blast! No pun intended.

However, it was very difficult to extract the cylinder pin when I cleaned it. I had to knock the pin out the first 1/4" or so from the back before it slipped out. After cleaning and without the cylinder in place, I notice that the pin sticks heavily just as the pion's locking ring enters the cross lock. Upon close examination, I can see a rough area on the ridge of the pin, as though it was being forced, or spun and had been grinding on something.

Any ideas on this condition, what I can do about it, and what might have caused it? I had removed the cylinder when I first brought it home and had some difficulty removing the pin, but not to this degree. I recall that it seemed tight, but I certainly didn't have to drive it out. This is my only SAA (so far), so I have nothing to compare it to.

Thanks, all.
 

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base pin should pull out with slight resistance, i would detail clean the base pin bore and also the base pin screw,nut and spring assy, and it`s bore. you might have a little dried grease in there. reassemble the screw, spring, nut assy and inspect it for clearance with a lighted magnifer.please use gunsmith screwdrivers of the correct size.rough spot on base pin could be polished with 600 sand paper, dont overdo it.
 

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Dorsey: I've seen this problem on all 3 generations of Colts and clones,new and old. Yes,you can do what icdux suggested and hope it works,but I'd rather have a tight base pin,than those that can work out under firing and get lost(not to mention the nut,cap and screw). If you are going to do a great deal of firing on Colt SAAs,buy an after market base pin,with a knurled or checkered end(unless you are shooting an older 1st gen. or "clone" that just uses the screw to hold in the pin). This will give you a better grip to remove the pin for cleaning and you can keep the original pin in the gun until you shoot it,thus keeping it in fine shape for the "collectors".

I have a couple that I use in my SAAs,but I can't remember where I got them!!

Never use pliers or a screwdriver to try and start them,and I kinda cringe at your pounding them out from the rear to get them started--if the hammer etc. should slip. Some of these pins come with very large heads,and WON't fit a gun with an ejector rod tube.

I agree,its a pain in the butt,and another reason why I won't reload/shoot black powder(besides not wanting that "potential bomb" in my residence!)

Good Luck,
Bud
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Under bright light and 10x magnification, I found a slight burr on the edge of the groove that enters the frame first. Although it was not possible to feel, that burr was keeping the pin from entering all the way. It's hard to describe without photos, but that was half the problem. I chucked the base pin in a tool room lathe and removed the burr with a fine file followed by polishing with 600 grit paper. It now slides smoothly in and out, as expected on a gun of this high quality.

The second half of the problem is how it got there. The best way I can describe it as if the cylinder pin where slammed against the catch each time the hammer falls, and the catch chewed it up. There is no other evidence of this, such as a spot at the back of the pin.

So, the problem is fixed for now, but I'd still like to understand what happened, and if anyone else has had a similar problem. This is a 95% gun that appears otherwise well cared for, most of the blue loss is on the grips, and the color case loss is on the gate. It was clearly never abused, just used, cleaned, and maybe handled a lot.
 

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The burred pin is many times caused by heavy recoil. I had a .357 magnum SAA that would burr the pin by recoil causing it to slap against the pin retaining button or possibly the frame. I had no similar problems with other calibers and moderate loads.
 
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