Colt Forum banner
1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,302 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Greetings AllI have been doing some woodworking in prep for refinishing some stocks. I am now at a point where I am comfortable working on the wood, the prep sanding, shaping and staining. However I have not been able to find a finish that I lile. I have tried Tru-Oil and Tung Oil but both cover the wood like an acrylic. I am looking to get a furniture like finish. I want to be able to feel the wood yet have it well sealed and protected. Any help would be greatly appreciated.Thanflanman
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,086 Posts
Greetings AllI have been doing some woodworking in prep for refinishing some stocks. I am now at a point where I am comfortable working on the wood, the prep sanding, shaping and staining. However I have not been able to find a finish that I lile. I have tried Tru-Oil and Tung Oil but both cover the wood like an acrylic. I am looking to get a furniture like finish. I want to be able to feel the wood yet have it well sealed and protected. Any help would be greatly appreciated.Thanflanman
If you like a satin sheen, as opposed to glossy, I've had very good luck with MinWax Polyurethane in the spray can.
One little trick I was told also, is do the spraying in the bathroom, after steaming up the room with hot water from the shower. This eliminates any dust particles from falling on to the grips as they dry. I usually do 3 - 4 separate coats, with light steel-wool sanding between coats. Last coat, use Rotton Stone to bring the finish you desire out.
Works for me :>)
Good Luck,
B50
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,754 Posts
...I have tried Tru-Oil and Tung Oil but both cover the wood like an acrylic...

You're probably doing it incorrectly. I have used Truoil for years and it has never failed me. You need to apply a THIN coat and let it dry completely. Lightly buff with #0000 steel wool and repeat. After five coats & five buffings it will appear like a perfect oil finish. Patience. :eek:
 
  • Like
Reactions: LEO918

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,832 Posts
What is the Stock on?
What Arm?
What Era?
What Species of Wood is the Stock?
Why did it require re-finishing?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
241 Posts
If a wood feel is what your in serch of you might try linseed oil. Ive used it on all my muzzle loaders.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
69 Posts
If a wood feel is what your in serch of you might try linseed oil. Ive used it on all my muzzle loaders.
Make sure it is boiled linseed oil. If not, you won't live long enough to see it dry. Don't ask how I know this. LOL

The rotten stone is an excellent way to get that subdued finish and have the feel and beauty of the wood come through.

Enjoy
Bob
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,739 Posts
I have tried all types of finishes. After long research on many different wood and gun forums, I've decided to try the Laurel Mountain Permalyn Sealer. By far the best I've ever used. I put the first coat on heavy with a soft bristle brush (it's thin) let it soak for about 10 mins then wipe off excess. I then put additional coats with my fingers until the pores are filled using 0000 steel wool between coats. It penetrates, seals and protects, and gives a smooth, rich, tough beautiful finish with a soft glow. I have done several rifle and handgun stocks with this. You won't be sorry.

Laurel Mountain Permalyn Stock Sealer 4oz Liquid
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,682 Posts
To restore wood military stocks I have found that boiled linseed oil and turpentine mixed 50/50 works great to get the original look. The 50/50 mix lets you work with the finish before it starts to dry, and normally dries in 24 hours. On the first coat apply a heavy coat, let it set 30 minutes, and rub everything back off with toweling. Smooth this out and let it dry. In subsequent coats just put a dot of finish on the wood and smooth it out until it will spread no farther, then do it again. The beautiful old finish on the 1903 Springfields was done by submerging the stocks in vats of heated linseed oil, then letting them drain. The heated oil penetrated the wood, but didn't build up.

For years I tried to use the TruOil, but like you found that it build up before I could get it smoothed out. It apparently has driers in it that don't contribute to a good finish unless you like build up finishes.

This is the original linseed oil finish on a 1903 Springfield built in 1916.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,302 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
This coating and wipe off may be what I am missing. I put on the tru-oil or tung oil and spread it with my fingers but leave at lest a 2-3mm thick coat and repeat four or five times. I do buff with sandpaper 600-1000 in between to smooth it out. At the end I have a coat that is smooth and shining but you can see the depth of it and you cannot feel the wood anylonger.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,827 Posts
Arrow Wood Finish....the more I use this product the more I prefer over all the other
finishs.

Arrow Wood, Gun Stock, and Antique Finish
+1 That is all I use now (for the past 10 or so years). I picked some up at a gun show -Some guy was demonstrating how to apply it. It only takes a very small amount and I really like the way it brings out the beauty of the grain.

He had on display about a 12" diameter,2" thick slice of a log- I don't remember what type of wood it was -but he claims He put the arrow wood finish on it shortly after it was cut and it never cracked. It did not have any cracks in it -pretty amazing considering the way wood shrinks perpendicular to the grain. I was always going to try this myself -cut a slice off a nice cherry,or balck walnut,or locust log and apply the finish and see for myself how it works. I will try this on the next good log I have.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
76 Posts
with tru-oil, wipe it off on your last coat and it won't leave a glossy layer. The finer you sand it the smoother it will be so you can control the final look somewhat. I would recommend sanding to at least 320 grit, then putting on a coat of tru-oil and wiping it off with a lint free cloth before it starts to set up. You can leave it as is or put a coat of paste wax then buff it. If the 320 is too rough, try sanding to 400 or 600 grit and do the same thing; good luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,754 Posts
The best way I have found to get a great finish with Truoil that looks fantastic is as follows:

five light coats of Truoil applied one at a time over a five day period (sooner if completely dry) with light buffing using #0000 steel wool between coats and using a lint free cotton rag for the final polish. I've tried other methods and this is the tried & true one that has never let me down. It looks like it was done by Holland & Holland. Well, I might be exaggerating a tad there, but it is fantastic.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
642 Posts
IMHO, the best wood finishes are lacquer based wood finishes.
When applying lacquer, it's extremely important that the wood panels are absolutely devoid of waxes, previous finishes, hand oils, or any contaminants, including dust.

Lacquer formulated these days, is nowhere near the quality of yester-year's lacquer finish quality, mainly due to environmental concerns.
However, today's lacquer still maintains that one major advantage over any other type of finish; ie, every coat goes right through to the base coat, and bonds as nothing else.
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top