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I think I'm with JudgeColt. When did some Americans become so fearful of a screwdriver, when they happily load new applications on their computers, run GPS apps on their smart phones, and have backup cameras on their cars?

Taking the sideplate off to take a look would be the first step for me. Just like buying a new radiator cap would be before I run to the dealership about a slight steam leak. Why? Because most Assembly Technicians at a company today have less knowledge about tools and metals and mechanics than the average member here. Think about it. The new Colts are made to be very easy to put together and little or no hand fitting. That's so an assembly person can screw in the screws or whatever tasks remain that are not done by robots. You think some 25 year old inner city worker knows what a "burr" is, or "chattering" or bimetallic galling? No, they know what they are told to do in the assembly documentation.

That's why my first comments were "is this a common problem?" If so, it could be a design issue. But other than "internet chatter" (another trait of our current society), there seems to be no engineering problem with the latch.

If a Colt comes back for repairs, it will go to one of the rare experts there, and it may be in a long line. But again, I find it ironic so many people that are manufacturing experts think it should be only opened by "the factory". I've worked with manufacturing all my career. I'm typically not impressed with the assembly techs. And that includes at several top 5 aviation and DoD companies. The days that an assembly line person was an expert at titanium and steel fabrication a long gone, like the SR-71.
 

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Discussion Starter #83
. . . I don't think the release is the issue itself... but probably a burr in the center of the ejector... or a burr in the recoil shield that the button retracts into.
Thanks, Reamer!

Yes, I was aware of the differences in latch function between Colts and Smith & Wesson. In fact, the barrel-shaped part that you've referred to as a "button", and that I had called the "bolt", came directly from a parts diagram for the Smith & Wesson 686, solely because Colt has yet to make a similar (updated) diagram available for the new 2020 Python.

And, as I had said here earlier, you're certainly right about your suggestion that "a burr in the recoil shield" could have been a factor. It was (is?) one of three or maybe even four different areas of concern in the latch on my Python.
 

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Discussion Starter #84
I think I'm with JudgeColt. When did some Americans become so fearful of a screwdriver . . .
Nope. No one here is (or was) "fearful of a screwdriver." I can't speak for others, but in my case, any reluctance to open-up my Python was rooted solely in the invalidation of the Colt 12-month manufacturers warranty.
 

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Make sure you use a hollow ground screwdriver. I have a set of Chapman bits and they fit perfectly in all my firearm screws. Less of a tendency to walk out of the slot and scratch the finish.
 

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Nope. No one here is (or was) "fearful of a screwdriver." I can't speak for others, but in my case, any reluctance to open-up my Python was rooted solely in the invalidation of the Colt 12-month manufacturers warranty.
Some of the posters did seem fearful of opening the new Python, apparently believing it to be somehow so very different from a "regular" revolver that common sense would not apply to opening the gun.

In regard to the warranty, first of all, I do not believe opening the gun would void the warranty. Disassembling and reassembling should not affect the warranty coverage. Removing a burr should not affect the warranty. Think of it like fixing a flat tire on a car under warranty.

Second, if you did not disclose that the gun had been opened, how would Colt know, assuming you did not do something stupid obvious, like bend the side plate or the like?

I am so glad that you opened your new Python because I do not have one and was sure that opening one would not be "rocket science." You proved it. Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter #87
In regard to the warranty, first of all, I do not believe opening the gun would void the warranty. Disassembling and reassembling should not affect the warranty coverage. Removing a burr should not affect the warranty. Think of it like fixing a flat tire on a car under warranty.

Second, if you did not disclose that the gun had been opened, how would Colt know, assuming you did not do something stupid obvious, like bend the side plate or the like?
Judge,

Although I understand both of your points here on the warranty, I would respectfully say that I'm not so sure. When it comes to manufacturers warranties, and their efforts to dodge responsibility on their products, I've seen all manner of devious and dishonest things take place. He'll, I've seen things as ridiculous as auto dealers denying warranty on a windshield wiper motor, due to the presence of non-OEM zip-ties on wiring bundles under the hood. Seriously! Anything they can do to save money.

Of course, in my case, we'll never know now, because its done, and this particular Python is unlikely to ever see a Colt facility or a Colt technician. However, had mine needed to actually go back to them, they most certainly would have known that it had been tampered with, because of the different color thread-lock compound that will be used when I reassemble it, and more importantly, because of the mirror-polished finish that I have spent the last 48-hours perfecting!

Anyway, I wish you (and all others here), the very best with your new Python(s), when and if you purchase one, and I'll hope that your experience with it goes just a little bit smoother than mine did. 😉

Cheers!
 

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Discussion Starter #88
I do have one more minor question or concern before putting my Python back together, that I'd like to ask the forum membership about. Its related to the heavier-than-usual SA/DA trigger pull weights on mine, that I mentioned earlier in this post, and my desire to reduce them both a bit. Specifically, how am I going to reduce my current trigger pull weights, if replacement parts aren't even available for the 2020 model, and I can't purchase a lower-tension hammer spring for it? Am I simply outta luck on that?

But rather than extending this already lengthy thread, I think I'll start a new topic (a new thread), probably under the 'Python' sub-group, rather than under this one (i.e., Revolvers).
 

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Discussion Starter #89
Well, after several weeks of messing with this thing, and submitting multiple postings on this forum, I am pleased to report that its finally done!

Earlier this afternoon, I finally completed the disassembly, internal and external polishing, and reassembly of this new 2020 Python, and the various steps that I've taken to resolve the sticky cylinder release latch, have worked marvelously! Its now as smooth as butter! I don't know for sure exactly where the hiccup was, but thorough internal polishing of all latch related components with a Dremel, and liberal use of gun grease, with repeated actuation of the latch, have fully resolved it. I couldn't be happier with it, and I'm super glad that I chose to do the repair myself.

That said, do I believe as a consumer, paying $1,500 for this revolver, that I should have had to take these corrective measures? No, I do not. Do I believe the latch design is a good one? No. I stand by what I said earlier. It is not a well-designed latch in my view, and I don't much care that the total number of consumer complaints on the latch is only fractional. The 'Z' spring, used to spring-load the latch, is positively, the weakest link in this latch design. Anyone who goes to the effort of disassembling and inspecting one of these things, will quickly see that I'm right. The travel channel in the side plate, in which the Z spring rests or sits, is about 3/8" tall, yet the Z spring itself (a Savage Firearms part), is barely 3/16" in height. As a result, its free to loosely flop around (north to south), in the travel channel, and it results in the disfiguring of the spring.

When I removed the Z spring on mine, it was twisted and disfigured in a clockwise fashion, that made it impossible for the spring to sit 'flat' in the travel channel, as it should, and clearly, this should NOT be the case, after just a week or two of ownership and use. And I plan on rectifying it myself in the near future, by crafting a taller (almost twice the height) Z-spring, using suitable spring steel wire. Something that will properly fit (and fill) that travel channel, so that actuating the latch, won't disfigure or distort the spring's shape, by allowing it to flop around loosely, the way it is currently designed.

So anyway, there we have It! My efforts with this particular Python are now done, more-or-less, and this thread can basically be closed. Thanks to all who contributed to this thread and helped with this effort, and the best of luck to all others out there, who may experience a sticky release latch.

Cheers! (y)
 

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Discussion Starter #91
Glad it worked out. I’ll be opening mine next week
Bob,

XLNT! Disassembly for me went rather quickly and smoothly, but reassembly? Not so much. Had a biatch of a time with the side plate and latch alignment. Hopefully, it'll go smoother for you. Good luck with it! 😉
 

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Discussion Starter #94
Yeah, I saw that video early-on, and its pretty cool, but at my old age, it was just too fast for me! There are a couple of other longer (and slower) un-animated ones that worked better for me. However, as you've noted, they are ALL focused on the older (original) version of the Python. Unfortunately, I found none on YouTube that were focused on the newer (2020) model.

When I disassembled mine, I just went super-slow and took multiple smartphone photos at each and every step, showing each part in-place, followed by another photo of that same piece once it was removed. That way, I had a reverse, step-by-step trail to follow when I reassembled it. And it helped, because you're right, the parts do differ somewhat between models.
 

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The "Z" spring type Colt cylinder latch was first used on the Colt Mark III series of 1969.
Over the many years Colt has used it it's given remarkably little trouble.

It sounds like your Python shipped with a distorted spring.
Making a wider "Z" spring might cause friction and binding problems all it's own.
 

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Discussion Starter #96
The "Z" spring type Colt cylinder latch was first used on the Colt Mark III series of 1969.
Over the many years Colt has used it it's given remarkably little trouble.

It sounds like your Python shipped with a distorted spring.
Making a wider "Z" spring might cause friction and binding problems all it's own.
Thanks DFaris, and yeah, I follow you for-sure. Its hard to say, but if one looks closely at the height of the latch channel itself, and then looks at the tiny size/height of the current Z spring, its plainly obvious that when under tension or not, that spring is free to roam north and south by quite a bit. And in my case, that's exactly what's happened. One end of that spring rests on the flattened (butt) end of the latch, while the other rests on the cylindrical white plastic stop that is driven into the side plate, and neither is really designed to hold the spring in-place. So if the spring itself were made larger (taller), such that it wasn't free to drift north or south, I think it would be a better solution, but I'll readily admit that crafting such a spring, that would be flat enough to clear the latch and the side plate, could be a challenge.
 
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