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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Just curious, has anyone here used "synthetic jacket" ammunition?

A friend of mine gave me some American Eagle ammunition, .45 ACP, 230 grain. However, this has a TSJ, or "total synthetic jacket". It's actually a polymer coating that is supposed to shoot cooler and cleaner than normal ammunition. I must admit that I'm a bit skeptical, but I was wondering if anyone else has used it, and what their thoughts were.
 

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Never heard of it, but I cast almost all my handgun bullets. Is the core lead? Sounds like the reason may be similar to Moly coating or Teflon coating, increase speed without increasing pressures. Just a guess.
 

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I'd not heard of it, either. So I Googled it and found this article that explains more about it.
https://gundigest.com/gear-ammo/reloading/american-eagle-syntech-tsj-synthetic-tip-ammo

Sounds good...but I think someone would have to do a lot of testing to really see a difference. I probably wouldn't be one to do all that testing. That's the benefit of having the articles. The concept is interesting. The biggest advantage I see, based on the article, is reducing wear in the bore and less effort required to clean the bore. That's what would appeal to me. But along with that appeal come the price difference. The article indicates one should expect to pay a little more for this ammo. I didn't look online to see what price difference there is.
 

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Sounds like a fancy version of powercoated hard-cast lead bullets, which handloaders have been using for years. They are cheap and work great. I prefer them to traditional lubed lead.
 

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I remember when Teflon-coated bullets that pierced body armor were being criticized by politicians as "cop-killer" bullets and it was allegedly due to the Teflon that made them so. The Teflon was there only to protect the bore of the gun due to the extreme hardness of the bullet...but the truth was lost on those politicians much like it is today.
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Well, I tried this at the range yesterday. it functions rather well, although I'm not sure if it lived up to all the hype. I really couldn't tell if it were cooler, but it did seem a bit cleaner than the Winchester Service Grade ammunition that I usually shoot.

Still, when it comes to guns, I'm rather old-fashioned, so I'll probably keep using the Winchester Service Grade ammo.
 

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It's an old concept, actually.

In the late 1970s and early 1980s, Federal ammunition and S&W co-produced a nylon coated lead bullet in loaded ammunition called "Nyclad". It was an early attempt to get reliable and considerable expansion out of a low alloy lead hollow-point bullet at subsonic velocities as seen out of 2 to 3 inch barrelled .38 Special revolvers. It also has the benefit of reducing lead contamination when firing indoors.

It had some drawbacks such as low penetration through barricades due to the almost pure lead bullet [this was a selling point to homeowners wanting a self defense round that wouldn't shoot through several walls] and being co-opted by TMJ bullets, sintered copper bullets, etc.
 

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I have a good supply of Federal NyClad .38 special HPs, and those are dead soft lead slugs covered in a proprietary plastic coating.
I haven't seen 'em on the shelf for a while......
 
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