Colt Forum banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
535 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
\"Takes a Lickin, but How Good\'s the Tickin?\"

I was told once that Colt DA revolvers often get, "out of time," in that if you squeeze the trigger too slowly, it won't lock up exactly and can, "shave," lead when the bullet goes through the forcing cone. Same guy told me that's why S&W DOESN'T do it that way. (I think I was told right, because I have seen this happen.) I've been around quite a few old Official Police's and about half of them were so affilcted. Had a Python, once, that was that way, too. And I read in, "Cooper on Handguns," that he thinks the real marvel about the SAA is how, "it can still be made to shoot with half its internal parts broken or missing." Kinda' makes ya' wonder, don't it? Should we all just pull up stakes and go to the Colt auto forum!? At one time, I owned a WWI issue Colt .45 and it was cheap when I bought it, NEVER miss fired and I really was comfortable with it. I never had occasion to shoot that gun at indoor paper to see how well it would really do. I could take it all apart with the army manual in front of me, easily, the first time AND put it all back together! I'm thinking wicked thoughts here, guys ... Somebody set me straight!?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,483 Posts
Re: \"Takes a Lickin, but How Good\'s the Tickin?\"

Well put "majic" about if Colts were so prone to get out of time,there would be more qualified Colt smiths(but of course,one could argue that S&Ws are far more prevelant since the 1950s sales eras). I once bought a pre M-20 S&W, a 4" 38/44 Heavy Duty that the policeman previous owner had put many,many rounds(NOT the hi speeds!) through in rapid double action. Yes,that big cylinder has "momentum,and hard to stop"and you could pump out 6 pretty quick,with great control,but it was outta time. Thankfully,cylinder bolt notches were not peened,but a new hand & bolt were gotten & I fitted them. So there is a documented N Frame failure to stay in time. While I am thinking of it; I can recall,reading a "shootout"article,probably by Mas Ayoob,probably 15 years ago in a gun magazine,about a policeman,who surprised a gun toting thug,and shot his Phython SO Quick,in D.A. that the wishbone spring broke after the third shot. It was OK,as the encounter was at arms length,the cop swung the shotguns muzzle outta they way with 1 hand,& fired the Python with his other
erp d1ed fore he hit the ground! Think that a fairly "new" mainspring could break by quick fire? Interesting thread! Bud
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
178 Posts
Re: \"Takes a Lickin, but How Good\'s the Tickin?\"

Speaking of "new" V mainsprings. Where does one get "new" mainsprings for old model Colt double action revolvers? Wolf doesn't seem to sell them. I suppose the E/I frame springs are still available from Colt but what about the D frames? CC
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,483 Posts
Re: \"Takes a Lickin, but How Good\'s the Tickin?\"

GunParts Company has them in stck. This was formerly Numrich Arms. Just do a "search" or maybe someone has the website. Ive seen em on eBxx,and other on line auctions,but your probably more "safer" with GunPartsCo. as it tends to be "newer,old stock".BUT-be prepared to buy some stuff you hadnt planned on,as the site has a lot of "goodies". Good Luck! Bud
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,064 Posts
Re: \"Takes a Lickin, but How Good\'s the Tickin?\"

A lot of old Colts are out of time, but not to the point of shaving lead. When you pull the trigger the cylinder usually rotates the fracion of an inch and the bolt engages. The S&W by design allows the cylinder to be loose and the bullet aligns the chamber with the bore.
Slow cock your Colts and you can then see this happen. Then slightly turn the cylinder and notice how far it actually have to move for lock-up. Compare this amount of movement to a Smith. If a Colt's hand is really worn then the cylinder will have play just like a Smith. Then usually it will behave like a Smith and the bullet aligns the chamber and bore, but that compromises the Colt's accuracy.
One little secret most Smith shooters seem to leave out is that the N-frames that have seen extensive double action useage also go out of time.
Usually only the extreme examples are discussed, but then it is applied to every double action Colt revolver.
What is kinda funny is that there are very few qualified Colt gunsmiths, but there are S&W gunsmiths under every rock. If Colt's broke as easily and as often as some say then shouldn't the numbers be reversed?

[This message has been edited by Majic (edited 04-20-2004).]
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top