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I am easily obsessed by good looking and feeling guns and I happened to see a Tanfoglio at my local Cabela's and did some more research and found one I liked more on GB. Due to my gun buying issues, it was delivered this week to my FFL. This one is a Combat Shooting Cohai, which were delivered to shooting clubs in Israel according to what I've read. It's a CZ75 copy. I wasn't interested in spending $600+ on a real CZ and these had great reviews and was under $400.00. So far I'm fairly impressed and I will probably shoot it this week and will follow up with a range report. Any opinions out there?



 

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Tangy's are excellent firearms, I have a Witness 45, polymer frame DA/SA that functions very well.

However, just like having a FEG clone is cool, it is not the same as owning a Hi Power.

Now get yourself a CZ 75b and quit resisting the urge.
 

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I have a TZ-75 that I bought way back when everyone absolutely HAD to have a "wonder nine." I really like it. Shoots well and feels better than any of the others, including the Browning HP.
 

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There was a time when Tanfoglio made true stainless pistols, not the "Wonder Finish" they offer now. They were of high quality, beautifully-finished. I have a true stainless Witness 9mm and a true stainless Witness .45ACP. Back in the 1990s when these pistols were new, the 10-round magazine capacity of the .45ACP pistol was rare. There was a redesign, sometime in the 1990s as I recall, when the trigger guard was enlarged and became more square-looking. The finger hook, as seen on the OP's pistol, was eliminated from the front of the trigger guard before that design change to the more square trigger guard, so later pistols had the "tear drop" shape to the trigger guard, but no finger hook.

While I wish that Tanfoglio still offered true stainless pistols, the current line is reliable and relatively inexpensive. Like so many guns today, given a choice, most of us would prefer an old model rather than a current model. I continue to look for a true stainless Super .38. The 18+1 magazine capacity intrigues me still.
 

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Great pistols. I get to shoot one when my neighbor brings his. Stands up great next to our CZ 75.
Drove by GB -- didn't know 75's had become a $600 pistol.
 

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Since the fall of the comi block, I don't remember where I read it but if I'm not mistaken Tangfolio of Italy is making the frames for CZ. I have a EAA Witness Stock II in 10mm which is a Tangfolio and the gun is marked so. The EAA is the importer in Florida. Never the less the gun is all stainless and man can that thing shoot. If you don't have one you may want to check it out. It is competition grade with a bull barrel no bushing lock up and has the H&K type polygonal rifling. I was so impressed shooting it with every round connecting that a friend decided to purchase one for him self. I originally purchased it to hunt Boar with and with 15 rounds of 10mm in the mag is really crazy hand gun power. You have a real nice gun there and as far as a CZ goes yes they are nice guns as well but don't sneeze at the Tanfoglio. I used to be the same until I purchased mine. Oh and No I don't work for the company or deal with them in any shape or form. Just stating my experience. Personally I don't like EAA since they are not customer friendly. That's another discussion for another forum thread.
 

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Most all the non-CZ pistols are made by Tanfoglio, who supplies parts or complete guns to sellers.
As example, Springfield Armory sold an excellent version as the P9. This was a higher end finish model.
They were also sold by FIE, and a model assembled in Switzerland as the Action Arms AT series.

These actually drove the innovation of the design, which CZ was failing to do.
In the later 80's CZ said it would take more then 5 years to introduce a Commander type round hammer, which Tanfoglio marketed less then a year later.
Tanfoglio also pioneered a ambidextrous safety before CZ.
Versions of these have been made in Israel as the Baby Eagle, and other countries.
Tanfoglio also helped other countries develop CZ-75 designs, notably in turkey.
The Turkish models have forged slides, frames, and barrels, while inexpensive, have very good reputations.

These are usually very shootable guns and most owners are pleased with the accuracy and reliability.

I owned an AT-84 Swiss model that was not at all reliable, an early FIE which was very good, a Springfield P9 I regret selling, and currently an early 90's EAA Witness stainless steel .45.
This has a cast stainless slide and frame, with all other parts carbon steel.

I recommend the Tanfoglio guns from personal experience.

My .45 version, which is more compact then the huge CZ-97B.

EAA Left.jpg
 

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While I may be wrong in reference to every early model since EAA began importing them, I think the "race guns" and two-tone guns have hard-chromed slides, and the "race guns" have hard-chromed frames, rather than true stainless steel. The Tanfoglio "race guns" are fabulous guns and are underpriced for what the buyer gets when compared to competitive offerings from other sources.

dfw, your pistol looks like it could be true stainless, unless it is one of the rare early "Wonder Finish" guns with polished flats, or hard chrome finish. The box/case end label will indicate the original finish, although sometimes it is coded "ss," "hc" or "wf" in relation to the model number, if it is not clearly stated somewhere on the label. (Enlarging the picture makes me think it may be hard chrome.) What is your pistol's actual finish?
 

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I had the EAA Witness in .38 Super, which I bought for about $100.00 less then the going price as this one sat in a LGS for quite a while.
 

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EAA did import a few actual stainless steel Witness models in the late 80's early 90's, and I "think" that for a very short time Springfield may have sold the P9 in stainless possibly only in .45.
These would have been the then-new universal size larger frame that will work with any caliber.

Mine DOES have a cast stainless steel slide and frame, all other parts are carbon.
The end label of the box lists it as "EAA45SS" and "Witness 45 Stainless".

I'm very "sold" on the CZ-75 design and have had good luck with all of them other then the Swiss Action Arms AT-84. This too was made of raw parts supplied by Tanfoglio.

I do have issues with the current EAA standard models, and that's that they've gone with the rails and some other changes I simply don't like which in my opinion take away from the original CZ-75 design.

Being totally honest with myself, I had to admit that the Witness .45 works out better for me than my Colt Government Models, Combat Commanders, and Officer's ACP's.

I have a large glove size hand but shorter fingers. Due to a problem with my right hand, I've always shot pistol left-handed.
Shooting the 1911 left-handed causes me two problems unless I'm extremely careful.
First, under recoil my trigger finger may nudge the slide stop up and cause the slide to lock open on a still-loaded magazine.
Second, also under recoil the area at the base of my thumb can push the safety up just enough to push the safety on enough to lock.

The CZ design puts the slide stop and safety up farther in an ideal position, and far enough none of these problems happen.
I still prefer my Colt Government because the EAA cast frame and slide do cause concerns about how durable they are.
A number of Witness owners, especially 10mm owners have had slides that cracked through the ejection port.

The CZ-97B .45 is also cast but better quality, but doesn't come in stainless, and is much larger then the Tanfoglio .45.
For some reason, on most CZ pistols they still insist on putting the trigger too far forward in the trigger guard and don't offer optional ambidextrous safeties for models like the 97B.

Had I need of a new 9mm it would be a CZ-75B in matte stainless steel, with a trip to Cajun Gun Works for one of their triggers that fit more to the rear.

An excellent buy are the Turkish guns made by Canik and sold by Tristar.
These have forged slides, frames, and barrels, with some models having aluminum frames.
Finishes appear to all be Cerakote, with some doubt whether the chrome model is not also Cerakote.
The base model is a close copy of the early CZ-75, with some features of the Tanfoglio design.
These seem to have a very good reputation for a budget model CZ type pistol.
People who send them to Cajun Gun Works say they rival CZ guns for actual shooting and durability.

Due to the Tristar prices I was sorely tempted to buy an all steel version but decided I prefer my .45 Witness.
 

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I have had a CZ-75B for a long time now and really like the action and the design of the Slide Rail mounting. Since mine is not very "pretty" with the original paint finish they were putting on them, they are a solid combat handgun. The first one I saw was back in the early 1980s when I was assisting with training at the JFK Special Warfare Center at Fort Bragg. I tried to get one them, but it never happend, LOL! The one I have was one of the "Turkish Military" contract pistols that were never delivered.

I had always wondered why they were not cloned as the design is excellent. Now I know that EAA has been doing that for years. Thanks for posting the information and I enjoyed reading thei thread a lot! Here is my "ugly" CZ-75B.

100704568_739_66870CD4E14E4A89.jpg
 

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Jeff Cooper had a high opinion of the CZ-75 design, but thought it would be better in .45, (of course).
Now we have .45's by CZ and Tanfoglio, with the Turks probably doing it soon.

The standard CZ size frame, which EAA no longer uses just feels "right" much like a Browning Hi-Power.
In my opinion, the CZ-75 design is better then the Browning for the selective DA-SA trigger, and a much better safety location.

I still love my Colt Government Model, but the EAA has a lot to offer in the larger calibers. For a 9mm I'd go with a CZ or a Tristar, and have a little work done to the trigger by Cajun Gun Works.
 

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I had always wondered why they were not cloned as the design is excellent. Now I know that EAA has been doing that for years.
To split a hair, EAA is not "doing that." EAA merely imports the pistols of Tanfoglio, which is actually "doing that."

I think all of the CZ-75 line that was imported after the ban on Eastern Bloc products ended had painted finish. My own CZ75, imported by a firm in Montana or Wyoming, the name of which escapes me at the moment, is painted. Not to run down Abwehr's CZ-75B, but I was always sorry to see that CZ bowed to the "hooked trigger" guard fetish of the 1980s. I have searched for years for a short-rail, blue CZ-75 that came through Canada in the 1970s, but have never found one. I continue to look.
 
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