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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I'm new to the forum l, but not to Colt Firearms! I have been a Colt Master Engraver since 2003 and a Firearms Engravers Guild of America (FEGA) Master for many years!

This is my latest project. Most of you will remember the iconic Tex & Patches poster that was used in Colt Advertising in the 1920's and 30's. Frank Schoonover (American Illustrator - 1877-1972) created these characters while studying Western art. In 1926 Frank wrote the following about his characters:


"The material for the picture was gathered from actual experience on ranches in Colorado and Montana. The painting is built up around the character of the man 'Tex' and his horse 'Patches.' Patches was probably the best and the most unpretentious cayuse in the cow country. He was ewe-necked and raw-boned but almost human when it was necessary to find a trail or get to camp on a black night. Tex and Patches just naturally made pictures when they were together, and it was always pretty fine to see them up on some little butte - horse and rider outlined against the sky. Tex would pull his foot out of the stirrup, turn a bit in the saddle, and look all about the country - just as you see him doing in the painting."

Note:

The first photo (Poster with Buntlines crossed) is large format - you and enlarge areas to see more of the detail, like the Stage Coach Robbery Scene, one of the most challenging gold inlays I've ever done!

Poster String instrument Musician Musical instrument Banjo guitar
Firearm Gun Trigger Revolver Product
Revolver Tool Metalworking hand tool Metal
Gun Revolver Trigger Shotgun
Horse Bridle Rein Animal sports Reining


The ivory grips: These were made for the 2004 Colt Collectors Association Auction Show Gun to be held at Portland, OR. Dan Chesiak made the grips and Dennis Holland created the color scrimshaw. The Custom Shop kept the grips at Hartford and sent a 4 1/2" SAA to Denis Kies for engraving, but when he returned it via Fed Ex it was stolen and never recovered. I was fortunate to buy them from the Custom Shop Table at the 2009 Concord CCA Show. The project was conceptually built around the grips - and the historical theme, of course.

Mike Dubber
 

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Welcome Mike. Most of the long timers on the Forum know of your work and would someday like to own some of it, myself included.
 

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Exquisite handiwork there, Mike. You will add a very welcome and unique perspective to the Forum. Welcome and enjoy the ride!
 

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Welcome Mike, and thanks for sharing your photos. I always enjoy looking at your work. To say that this project is amazing would be an understatement. Besides the obvious beauty of the scrollwork and the engraving, I enjoyed noting even the inticacy of the screws, and design effects such as those on the hammer. Glad to have you here-
 

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Welcome to the Colt Forum Mike.

I've seen your work and I'm a great admirer of your style. You sure do have "the touch" Mike, and your tight "American" (I hope I'm right) scroll work is simply amazing.

I may have to talk to you one of these days, soon.

Good luck in all your future endeavours, and I hope you enjoy your stay here on the Colt Forum Mike.

Bud
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 · (Edited)
Yes, in general terms I tend to identify my scrolls as falling within the general category of American Scrolls. It's somewhat difficult to get more specific than that, but the underlying basis for all the scrolls I cut on Colt Firearms fall into a sub-category of "Colt Scroll work" - once again, difficult to describe or recognize for most, but there are certain design attributes that Colt Master Engravers define as historically based Colt Scroll work. This is not mathematics or science, it's art, and it's open to opinion(s). The scroll pattern on Tex & Patches is a current/modern pattern with applied individual style....individuality has been at the base of Colt engraving throughout its history, i.e., Young, Glahn, Nimschke, Helfricht, and/or all the other "Colt Shops" that were led by various Masters. They each offered their personal styles and added to the history of Colt Engravng Art.

What irks me most is when I see engravers (sic) cut non-typical or historically unreralated scrolls on Colt Firearms that do not, never have, nor ever will be appropriate to Colt firearms. That often happens when unskilled or uneducated novice engravers engrave Colts and I see that kind of artistic travesty a lot more than I would like to!

Sam Colt was an magnificent industrialist, and he was also the No. 1 salesman for the company. He promoted his business by giving many highly engraved gifts to politicians, Royalty, military and other significant individuals to promote his product. Hand Engraving on an American industrial and cultural icon like a Colt Firearm deserves to be held to a standard of style an excellence.
 
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