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The Consummate Collector
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This little nickel Police Positive .32 belonged to Bill Rogers and has his initials embossed on the holster. When I bought the gun it even had his business card with it. William Rogers had a very distinguished career. After serving about a year as an attorney for a Wall Street law office, he became an assistant district attorney in 1938 and was appointed by then District Attorney Thomas E. Dewey to a sixty-man task force aimed at routing out New York City's organized crime. He entered the United States Navy in 1942, serving on the USS Intrepid, including her action in the Battle of Okinawa. His final rank in the Navy was lieutenant commander. Rogers joined the Administration of President Dwight D. Eisenhower as Deputy Attorney General in 1953. Rogers then served as Attorney General from 1957 to 1961. He remained a close advisor to Vice President Nixon throughout the Eisenhower administration, especially during Eisenhower's two medical crises. Rogers then served as United States Secretary of State in the Nixon administration from January 22, 1969, through September 3, 1973. One of his notable works was to initiate efforts at a lasting peace in the Arab-Israeli conflict through the so-called Rogers Plan. On October 15, 1973, Rogers received the Presidential Medal of Freedom from President Richard Nixon. At the same ceremony, his wife, Adele Rogers, was presented with the Presidential Citizens Medal. Rogers also led the investigation into the explosion of the space shuttle Challenger. This panel, called the Rogers Commission, was the first to criticize NASA management for its role in negligence of safety in the Space Shuttle program. Among the more famous members of Rogers' panel were astronauts Neil Armstrong and Sally Ride, Air Force general Donald Kutyna, and physicist Richard Feynman. Upon returning to private practice Rogers worked at his law firm, now renamed Clifford Chance Rogers & Wells after a 1999 merger, in its Washington office until several months before his death in 2001. He was 88 years old.

Upon lettering the gun I find it was a Pequano Model that was shipped to Puerto Rico in 1941. I wonder how this little gun ended up with Bill Rogers.





 

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Upon lettering the gun I find it was a Pequano Model that was shipped to Puerto Rico in 1941. I wonder how this little gun ended up with Bill Rogers.



Nice interesting Colt Cam. Can you or someone pleased explain what the "Pequano" Model" is. How is it different from a regular Police Positive?
 

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Not sure if this is who the revolver was shipped to but in the 1940 US Census for Ponce Puerto Rico there was a Valois Pagan that is listed as the Propietario ferreteria, which I think is proprietor of a hardware store. He was born about 1880 in Puerto Rico.
 

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The Consummate Collector
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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
Nice interesting Colt Cam. Can you or someone pleased explain what the "Pequano" Model" is. How is it different from a regular Police Positive?
PEQUANO MODEL was a name that Colt used to refer to a special run of .32 Police Positive revolvers that were shipped south of the border. The name referred to: The Little One. They are listed in the Colt ledger book in a separate section and all in the same serial number range. They were offered with the 2", 2 1/2", 4", 5" and 6" barrel lengths. Rumors claim that these were made with inferior parts or workmanship but I can find no evidence of that and have observed dozens of these. The name PEQUANO is not marked on the gun but Colt did place a label on the boxes showing the name:



Note the spelling on the label is not the same as on the Colt letter and I assume the ledger book.
 

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Having recently acquired a 2-1/2" Pequano Model, I am pleased to learn more about these 'Little Ones." Thanks for sharing the pictures and information!!
 

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Nice Colt, with an interesting history. I've seen those pistols referred to as "Pequanos" before, but never knew why. Now I'm even more curious: the box labels say "Pequeno" which is Spanish for "small", which I'd guess would be the correct way to describe those little guns. How do you suppose the word evolved into "Pequano"?
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Nice Colt, with an interesting history. I've seen those pistols referred to as "Pequanos" before, but never knew why. Now I'm even more curious: the box labels say "Pequeno" which is Spanish for "small", which I'd guess would be the correct way to describe those little guns. How do you suppose the word evolved into "Pequano"?
The box label is the correct spelling and Colt referred to these guns as: "The Small One" or The Little One. I think the Spanish word got misspelled when it was entered into the records.
 

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What I've always wondered is how these interesting little guns got named "Pequano" by US collectors when 1) that isn't a word in any known language, and 2) Colt always referred to them as the "Pequen~o" model, which is the actual Spanish for "little." You can see that model name on the boxes shown in the pix posted above.

Great post and a great (little) gun!
 

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The Consummate Collector
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Discussion Starter · #18 · (Edited)
What I've always wondered is how these interesting little guns got named "Pequano" by US collectors when 1) that isn't a word in any known language, and 2) Colt always referred to them as the "Pequen~o" model, which is the actual Spanish for "little." You can see that model name on the boxes shown in the pix posted above.

Great post and a great (little) gun!
Mike. Thanks for your post. Colt did refer to these as the pequeño Model according to the box end label. However the Ledger book shows them as the Pequano Model (See my original post showing the Colt letter). The Colt Historians take the information and spelling from the original Colt ledger books when they do a historical letter, thus the incorrect spelling. The translation for the word: pequeño : small, little

That is why I posted above that Colt referred to these guns as: "The Little One" or "The Small One"


I hope this information helps.
 
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