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"A Nevada sheriff standing against the light from an atomic blast 40 miles away. Operation Teapot, 1955"
Made me wonder! Any possible connection to your Colt Wyatt? Does the gun always feel warm to the touch :)

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In 1969 I worked with one Albert Coe Bonnell (age 56). His grandfather was George Coe, who rode with Billy The Kid. Albert's family ranch was 10 miles south of Lincoln, NM. On July 16, 1945 at 5:30 am the 1st atomic bomb was exploded about 80 miles west at White Sands. Al said that the whole world lit up, and they thought it was the End!! I guess that it was about 6 minutes afterward, that the Sound Arrived on Al's ranch. So that was another rude shock!
 

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If he did , he has gone in history farther then I will make . Pretty cool picture . I hope the world has learned .
 

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Around 1957 the army unit I was in sent some troops to Camp Desert Rock, Nv. for some atomic tests, I was bummed that I didn't get to go, now I'm glad. One of our guys said he was standing in the doorway to his billet when a A bomb was exploded, he said the other troops said they could see right through him when it detonated
 

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I just grabbed this pic of the internet, but my uncle has one of these silver pins he bought from the widow of the man it originally belonged to back when he was a navigator with SAC in the 60s or so.

716674
 

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I remember the duck and cover drills...if I remember it was three short rings and one long ring of the bell gave you time to get in the hallways and assume the position against the wall...three long and one short ring meant there wasn't enough tie...duck and cover under your desk. We even had a county-wide drill where school was called after a half-day and everyone had to walk home...no buses...in case of a war was about to occur and there was time to get home. I had to cross a swampy area known to have snakes to get home...I ended up stepping on something that moved under my foot...didn't hang around long enough to find out what it was.

Ohhh...the good old days! :oops:
 

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I remember the duck & cover drills in elementary school. I don't remember what the bell sequence was but we had 2 also...one for "the incoming missile" and one for a tornado. I don't remember doing either drill in junior high or high school. Maybe they didn't figure we were worth the effort by that time.
 

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Remember them well. I was 2nd or 3rd grade maybe. That would be 1956 or so. Always appreciated our government for providing those lead, radiation proof desks.
 

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I remember the duck & cover drills in elementary school. I don't remember what the bell sequence was but we had 2 also...one for "the incoming missile" and one for a tornado. I don't remember doing either drill in junior high or high school. Maybe they didn't figure we were worth the effort by that time.
Oh, but I also remember how it felt during the Cuban Missile Crisis (Oct-Nov 1962). Walking outside at my Alice, TX high school, looking up at the sky and wondering "will it be today"? At the time I knew that Corpus (40 miles east) or Kingsville (20 miles SE) would be more likely targets, as they had military facilities there. But were we far enough away to survive an atomic bomb attack?
 

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Oh, but I also remember how it felt during the Cuban Missile Crisis (Oct-Nov 1962). Walking outside at my Alice, TX high school, looking up at the sky and wondering "will it be today"? At the time I knew that Corpus (40 miles east) or Kingsville (20 miles SE) would be more likely targets, as they had military facilities there. But were we far enough away to survive an atomic bomb attack?
We had just moved to Midland in March of '62. The closest military bases were Webb AFB in Big Spring and Walker AFB in Roswell, NM. Walker was a SAC base. Folks in Midland were concerned because at that time the Permian Basin was the top producer of petroleum in the country.
 

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Nuclear tipped ballistic missiles at that weren't very accurate which is why they had such heavy megatonnage yield...even they missed by some distance close was good enough. Any area near the targets were in district danger. Today with much more precise targeting yields are far lower to inflict damage to the target itself and less to surrounding area.

But we're still talking nukes...armageddon is still armageddon.
 

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We had just moved to Midland in March of '62. The closest military bases were Webb AFB in Big Spring and Walker AFB in Roswell, NM. Walker was a SAC base. Folks in Midland were concerned because at that time the Permian Basin was the top producer of petroleum in the country.
We actually built a small bomb shelter. It was the basement of the back yard workshop. Only the upper 18" was above ground, with a small door facing east. In later years it was used to store such things as preserves and some canned goods.
 

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Oh, but I also remember how it felt during the Cuban Missile Crisis (Oct-Nov 1962). Walking outside at my Alice, TX high school, looking up at the sky and wondering "will it be today"? At the time I knew that Corpus (40 miles east) or Kingsville (20 miles SE) would be more likely targets, as they had military facilities there. But were we far enough away to survive an atomic bomb attack?
I was in the army in Germany when the Cuban missile crisis took place, there was a sort of air of doom over everything, we were loaded up and ready to go. The Germans were really scared. So was I.
 
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