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I use that gun as a nightlight since it still glows in the dark. That photo is from 1955 and Mercury City was started in 1950. Captain Robert Revert was a local lawman and then the civilian sheriff of Mercury from the start to beyond 1969. He was also a businessman in Beatty and a State Assemblyman for years. That sure looks like him. My gun that belonged to him that he had rebuilt by Colt in 1969 might very well be the gun in the holster there when it was still a .32-20. That picture says "Operation Teapot 1955". That happened at two locations at Mercury City, alright. I think that's our guy decked out wearing a western outfit.
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I use that gun as a nightlight since it still glows in the dark. That photo is from 1955 and Mercury City was started in 1950. Captain Robert Revert was a local lawman and then the civilian sheriff of Mercury from the start to beyond 1969. He was also a businessman in Beatty and a State Assemblyman for years. That sure looks like him. My gun that belonged to him that he had rebuilt by Colt in 1969 might very well be the gun in the holster there when it was still a .32-20. That picture says "Operation Teapot 1955". That happened at two locations at Mercury City, alright. I think that's our guy decked out for some special occasion wearing a western outfit.
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So Colt changed out the barrel and cylinder, and returned the original 32-20 parts. That is fantastic -- still having all of this together, box with postmark and all!

The gun really glows in the dark?
 

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Wyatt, neat that you have one more items to go with your gun. Any idea how Captain Revert died and when?
I just looked up his obituary but only found his son who died recently at 72.
Enlarging the picture you posted the gun in the holster has the look of a double action to me. The cartridge in the loop on his left look bigger than a .38 but hard to tell. He wears his badge in the exact spot as Revert wore his. In an interview in the late 50s, Revert said the “magnum” he shot at a guy escaping in a car really kicked”. But his daughter I contacted wrote me back and said she didn’t remember a “cowboy gun” or a magnum but she still has his ”.38”.
 

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So Colt changed out the barrel and cylinder, and returned the original 32-20 parts. That is fantastic -- still having all of this together, box with postmark and all!

The gun really glows in the dark?
No, but I should put a geiger counter to it. I bought this rebuilt 1911 vintage .45 a few years back. Then later the seller contacted me because the widow he bought it from found the 1969 Colt shipping box with parts hidden in her ceiling by her late husband. She gave it to him and he sold it to me. Then I found out later the history of the guy Colt shipped the gun to. I contacted the historian on Pawn Stars, Mark Hall-Patton and he said the Revert family is still a famous name to old timers locally to southern Nevada.
 

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No, but I should put a geiger counter to it. I bought this rebuilt 1911 vintage .45 a few years back. Then later the seller contacted me because the widow he bought it from found the 1969 Colt shipping box with parts hidden in her ceiling by her late husband. She gave it to him and he sold it to me. Then I found out later the history of the guy Colt shipped the gun to. I contacted the historian on Pawn Stars, Mark Hall-Patton and he said the Revert family is still a famous name to old timers locally to southern Nevada.
A chain of very fortunate events which happen almost never! So it went from a re-built SAA with no history, to getting the original parts, and then solid provenance to a past owner who is worthy of further research.
 

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I just looked up his obituary but only found his son who died recently at 72.
Enlarging the picture you posted the gun in the holster has the look of a double action to me. The cartridge in the loop on his left look bigger than a .38 but hard to tell. He wears his badge in the exact spot as Revert wore his. In an interview in the late 50s, Revert said the “magnum” he shot at a guy escaping in a car really kicked”. But his daughter I contacted wrote me back and said she didn’t remember a “cowboy gun” or a magnum but she still has his ”.38”.
Wyatt, Isn't this your man Robert A. Revert? His Obit. Mentions test sight, assemblyman, and sheriff.
 

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I lived/still live exactly halfway between two major targets - Wright-Patterson Air Force Base and the Lima Tank Plant in Ohio, as well as 4 miles away from the 664th Squadron radar station, part of the Air Defense Command network. We always figured that between the initial strike and the fallout that we were goners....
 

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Wyatt, Isn't this your man Robert A. Revert? His Obit. Mentions test sight, assemblyman, and sheriff.
Yep, and looks like hanging around all the nuclear blasts out there didn’t effect him. One sad article said Revert’s young son opened up the top of a gas storage tank at their company and was killed by the fumes. If his daughter gets back to me I’m going to ask her what his “.38” was. Still waiting to see if she says that’s her dad in the picture With the explosion behind him.
The gun was said to have a Pinkerton/Nevada railroad connection but the Colt factory letter I ordered has no mention of it. Shipped to Norvell Shapleigh Hardware Co. St. Louis, 10-14-1911.
 

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It's hard to tell where I live if the shelters are bomb shelters or if they are just plain old storm cellars. I wonder how common it is in South Florida to find an old home with a bomb shelter still in it......
 

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I remember doing Duck and Cover, and Stop, Drop and Roll exercises in school, back in 1964 and 65.

I, later, found a book on the effects of the A bomb on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, that was published by the Government for the US Air Force, complete with photos of the ruins, and victims, of two cities.
 

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I remember doing Duck and Cover, and Stop, Drop and Roll exercises in school, back in 1964 and 65.

I, later, found a book on the effects of the A bomb on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, that was published by the Government for the US Air Force, complete with photos of the ruins, and victims, of two cities.
I was in the 1st grade in 1964 and remember walking to school looking up in the sky around then because the world was supposed to end that particular day. And of course we’d practice getting under our desks covering our heads. thanks to the Cuban missile crisis of 1962.
 

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Captain Robert Revert’s daughter contacted me and said she doesn’t think the guy in front of the nuclear blast is her father because he never wore a ”kercheif” like that around his neck that she remembers. She also said it resembles another lawman from Tonopah, , NV, Nye County Sheriff ”George Barra”. But she’ll check the picture out more.
I was wrong about something. Reading a Revert interview he says he was Sheriff of the test site starting in 1960, not 1950. that “atomic Sheriff” is there in 1955 when that bomb was tested so it might not be Revert, though he was a lawman in that very area too, and a businessman/State assemblyman in the nearby town.
 
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