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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hi everyone;

I was digging through our Canadian Criminal Code last night and this morning, looking for some information on carrying an antique firearm in Canada and came across some rather interesting material compiled by our own Nation Firearms Association. Here's the link to that information. It's about halfway down the page.

Before I add the text from our Nation Firearms Association I'd like to mention that the Canadian Criminal Code state that a cap and ball revolver, for example, manufactured before 1898, is in fact an antique. However, any reproduction cap and ball revolver made after 1898 is not an antique.

So, the text below is from our own National Firearms Association, it says that .....

"Clearly, a Walker Colt cap-and-ball revolver manufactured in 1847 is an "antique firearm." The 1847 batch of Walker Colts was not manufactured by Colt. Each specimen was manufactured in a factory not owned by Colt, marked "Colt," and sold to Colt. Colt then sold it to Colt's customers."

I was always under the impression that the Colt factory was up and running fine when Captain Walker came to Sam Colt to ask that Colt manufacture the eleven hundred Colt Walkers for the Texas Rangers.

Does anyone know for certain if the above quoted information about where those eleven hundred Colt Walker revolvers were actually manufactured is true or not?
 

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Colt had no factory in 1847. His Paterson venture went into bankruptcy/receivership a few years prior. He had Eli Whitney manufacture the Walker for him, and with the profit from that he built his own factory in Hartford.

John Gross
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thank you John, that's exactly what I wanted to ascertain because once again I am in discussion with a friend about the second and third generation Colt cap and ball revolvers. He argues that the third generation are not real Colt revolvers, and I told him, (and based on the fact that the Walker wasn't even made by Colt) that all of the third generation cap and ball revolvers that were made by companies other than Colt, must be (by definition), genuine Colts also.

Bud

Colt had no factory in 1847. His Paterson venture went into bankruptcy/receivership a few years prior. He had Eli Whitney manufacture the Walker for him, and with the profit from that he built his own factory in Hartford.

John Gross
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Yep, that's the way I see it too.

Thanks BigG

Bud

They are all Colt's whether made by Colt or a contractor manufacturing on behalf of Colt. Patersons, Walkers, Dragoons, 2nd and 3rd generations, all Colt's pistols, BTW.
 

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They didnt just use the profits from Eli Whitneys manufactured Colts to build the colt factory, I do believe the deal also stipulated that Colt got the tooling after the Walker run was complete. This tooling was probably a bigger deal than the profits in the long run.
 

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That would be like saying Chevy's that were not made in Detroit are not real Chevy's..........
 

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Colt's profit on the Whitneyville 'Walkers' would not have been enough to Build a Factory of any size anyway...

Whitneyville had to make their cut also, for their part in Tooling-up and cost of Materials and Labor and so on, and, even ten Grand in 1847 would only go so far when it came to construction, outfitting a Manufacturing concern, getting Machines made, etc.

Out of the supposed 1,100 Whitneyville Walkers, what do we imagine Sam Colt's share of Profit to have been? ( I have no idea, and, I do not remember what the Revolving Pistols had sold for ).

I am sure Colt had some additional financing from some source for setting up in Hartford.


If Colt got the 'Walker' Tooling from Whitneyville, it must have come at some Cost...it would have had considerable Value even after Whitneyville's run was over with...and, of course, it would have likely been adaptable to the succeeding Dragoons' Manufacture.
 

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Found it. Contract of Jan 4, 1847 said the revolvers (Walkers) cost 25 dollars each plus another 3 dollars for accessories. Colt said he didnt make any money on the contract and assigned it to Whitney in return for ANOTHER contract with whitney that included the provision that Sam Colt "...should own all special machinery bought for the purpose of making arms..." so he wound up with some of the tooling needed. (A History of the Colt Revolver, Haven and Belden page 49)
 
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