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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I walked into the LGS today they got a Winchester model 1911. The "Widdowmaker" push the barrel down to load it. recoil operated semi auto shotgun. Asking sub 400 dollars not really Interest in it unless i trade for it. The current inventory Is a remington 1100, 11-87, both 12 gauge. A Winchester model 12, and pump action benelli, a few 870's and remingtons.

They are in short supply of revolvers, and certain things of interest to me. Besides the 11-87, and the Winchester 1911 I'd trade 2 guns for either of those. Might do that Saturday not sure. The 1911 is in decent shape, all original parts, good patina no rust. And with the production run between 1911-1925. Being about 100 to 111 years old looks pretty good. I might be clearing out the stables a bit more this weekend.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Nice find I have been looking for a winchester 1911. They don't sell for a whole lot of money but I'd really rather have the 11-87. The 1100 is to much for the condition.
 

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The 1911 was not a very good gun. Winchester tried to market a semi auto after Browning's success and they had to work around too many patents. They used a 3 piece laminated stock and the recoil system is a real pain.
 

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My dad and his brother saved their money for a shotgun, and "lucked" upon a Model 1911 Winchester at a price they could afford. My dad said it kicked terribly, but thankfully it would never shoot two times in a row, so you had time to recover.

The Remington Model 1911 patent prevented Winchester from using a handle on the bolt to load a shell into the chamber so Winchester's answer was the knurled area on the barrel for loading a shell or clearing the many fail to ejects. The Model 1911 Winchester got the nickname "Possum Tail" from this knurled area. More than a few fingers and hands were lost from grabbing the end of the barrel for more leverage in cocking and loading.
 

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I think 870s ,1100s and 1187s are the Best Buy out there - seems forever.
I just picked up a magnum pump, 30” full few weeks ago for 5 otd.
Was actually nicer than my wingmaster ( which is nice ) that I signed over to my son .
They also have an 1100 synthetic that I want for 450.
If you have zero firearms , or twenty - don’t think you’d ever go wrong with one of these.

I have a ‘39 model 24 , word is they’re a crapshoot and boxy 2x4
Took the safety out and honed chambers- doesn’t miss a beat, and no loop/s for me ,for a miss on my belt . Also have an early seventies 101 from Gramps.

My pride though are my two 20ga Colts , and my Coltsman Police pump in 12.
 

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My 11-87 was the first shotgun that I used to brake 25 out of 25 clay birds. It's an anniversary model engrave on the receiver ( I think Remington 150 or 175 year would have to check, never thought I would forget but I have) later picked up an old 1100 Trap gun with the high comb.
The 870 is a legendary shotgun worthy of all the praise it gets. I have my Uncles' from the 60s. I picked up a newer but well used one from my police dept. when we upgraded to Winchester pumps.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
The 1911 was not a very good gun. Winchester tried to market a semi auto after Browning's success and they had to work around too many patents. They used a 3 piece laminated stock and the recoil system is a real pain.
Upon further inspection of it it's a 1913 serial number is in the 37k range. the buttstock has a good crack in it and the foregrip as well those are the only 2 real issues with it that i saw they are easily repairable with some acraglas, and some brass pins. Drill the end of the crack to stop it in the stock. the foregrip likely the same deal bed it with acraglass and it would be good. Or finding new old stock original parts.
 

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Recoil operated shotguns are very hard on the wood and it is often the weak point. This true even on the Browning A5. New old stock parts for the A5 are nearly all gone as far as the wood goes. I doubt any exists for the Winchester 1911 since it had a much shorter run and was made in much smaller numbers. I look at the 1911 in this way. Yes it is a Winchester and kind of interesting but it is one of their failures and not a great gun. Just to have one for having ones sake is not high on my list.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I actually found some laminated stocks, and a few walnut or other hardwood stocks. Yeah they beat the wood up for sure, i wouldn't mind having to carve one for it though. And I think inletting the stock and putting some nice hard rubber or something to absorb the impact would Help
 
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