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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've never been one for nicknaming my firearms but acquired a Model 1905 from a Mexican lady who said her grandfather brought it from Mexico. I've dubbed it the "Pancho Villa" gun. The pistol is complete except for a missing grip screw but retains little finish. Serial number is 57XX.

Does the Forum have an opinion on the advisability of shooting this model? I've read pro's and con's. I handloaded a 200 grain SWC over a middle-of-the road charge of Unique and have used this load with great success. It is quite accurate and pleasant to shoot despite the minuscule sights. I will never subject it to steady use but do "exercise" all the guns in the collection on occasion.

Does the Forum know if the grip screw is the same size as grip screws on other early Colt automatics? I'd be pleased to find a couple more of these screws if someone would advise me of a source.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Just moving this to the top of the stack again in hopes that another Model 1905 .45 owner will see it.

Any opinion out there on the advisability of shooting the old Colt Model 1905 .45 auto pistol? What about the early .38 ACP models? I believe I recall seeing an article in "American Rifleman" about these pre-1911 Colt 45 automatics. It may have been about the Model 1907 variant that was a test model for the Army. In the article the subject pistol was briefly tested. The author advised against shooting the early Colt .38 ACP and .45 ACP guns. The design appears sound to me. An aged, worn pistol might be troublesome but still doesn't appear particularly unsafe.

Anyone who has fired any of the early big Colt .38 ACP's or .45 ACP kindly share his experiences and thoughts.

Can anyone recommend a source for grip screws? The Numrich catalogue seems to represent that the screws are the same for the Model 1905 as grip screws for the Models 1900, 1902, and 1903 .38 ACP but is unclear.
 

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I'll play.

I have shot the parallelogram linkage Colts from time to time. I really enjoy shooting them, particualrly the M1905. I shoot them with VERY light loads. The reason is that all that is between me and a slide in the face is a small metal bar through the front of the slide. Every time I pull the trigger, I think of how the slide might taste as it hits me in the face. That fear, probably irrational, taints the pleasure of shooting these wonderful old pistols. Still, I do it every now and then.

As far as the stock screws, why not just take some out of a Government Model or military M1911 and see if they fit. (Surely, every Colt person has at least one of the those most famous of Colts, right? [Easy SSA lovers, you do not need to argue that point right now!]) Even buying the screws without knowing if they would fit would not be a huge investment. They look the same to me, but I did not try to exchange them.
 

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Sorry , I can't answer the screw question . As the Judge suggests , it would be easy to check the compatability with a 1911 screw .

I fired about 1/2 box of factory 185 swc loads in mine when I bought it about 20 yrs ago . It works great . I haven't felt the need to fire it since , but I know it works if I need to again .

Any chance we could see the "Pancho Villa" ? /forums/images/graemlins/smile.gif

Here's mine .

 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I'm a computer neanderthal with a dodgy Power Mac from 1995 and no digital camera. I've been wishing to post photo's in forums for some time. You've fired me up. I'll bum the office digital camera and see if I can snap some shots of ol' Pancho. It is not nearly as nice as the Model 1905 pictured.

Back when the various Colt .38 ACP models were available for cheap I sorta wanted a late vintage .38 ACP pistol to shoot. Never took advantage of those $200-$300 prices so now I'm left out.

I imagine that the .38 ACP guns are quite pleasant to shoot. I was always more interested in shooting one of those than the Model 1905.

Shooting impression of my Model 1905 was very good and I was surprised. I'd read that they were bears to shoot. I can get by with the miniscule sights in bright range conditions, and am less discrminating about handgun sights than most. Recoil was mild and not at all what I'd heard. Grip angle was different but pleasant. The pistol fired really tight groups and engaged a swinging disc target with ease, even out to 40 yards or so. Of course I'd carefully prepared some moderate 200 grain lead SWC ammo especially for the Model 1905. It fed these without a bobble. In use, the old pistol give a feeling of quality and elegance that is appreciated.

I've never remembered to try 1911 magazines in the 1905 to see whether they could be used, though I've heard they do work. Physical differences in the magazines lead me to think the 1911 magazines wouldn't work at all.
 

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You might try pulling a grip panel off and then try the 1911 screw for thread size . Will it screw in ? If yes , it's a pretty simple fix to reduce the o.d. on a lathe .


I think a man would've been well armed back then carrying the 1905 . Although , finding ammo on the shelf might have been difficult . No other gun chambered for it for several years . Probably not much call for the average general store operator to keep it on hand .
 

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The grip angle is different, so the M1905 magazine will not interchange with a M1911-pattern pistol. M1905 magazines are scarce. Originals are apparently soft in the body and will often have "dimples" in the body from the cartridges slamming into the body during recoil. (Mine does.) At one time, I think an aftermarket maker (Triple K?) made magazines, but what is the point? The guns are not likely to be shot more than occasionally so extra magazines are not an issue for most.

gs has the right idea of the stock screws. IF the threads are the same, just turn the head down. You do not even need a lathe. Just chuck the screw in a drill and apply a sharp file to the edge until the right diameter and contour are reached. Smooth it up with some sand paper of the proper to achieve the correct finish texture, add some cold blue and you will be as close as you are likely to get. If you turn the chuck too tight, you might have to dress up the threads a bit so as not to damage a priceless stock screw bushing. I sometimes put some tape on the screw shank to avoid thread damage from the chuck, but it is harder to keep the screw centered with tape on it.
 

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That's a good idea . Sometimes simple is best /forums/images/graemlins/cool.gif
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks for the advice about the screws and good comment. I'll try out the 1911 grip screws and report back.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Here comes this old post again.

I was digging through a bin of used handgun grips of all makes and found what appears to be a unused pair of factory Model 1905 checkered walnut grips. They didn't have escutcheons and had a couple of small flecks of white paint on them which was easily removed with judicious use of a fingernail. Of course I picked them up. Surely these aren't truely original Colt grips though they give every appearance of being so. Don't really think they would look proper on my doggy old Model 1905 since they are so nice but still thought they were a find.

Any opinions?

Hoping to be able to post photo's of the Model 1905 and will include one of these grips.
 
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