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It would be great if all the old ones could talk. :)
 

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It would be great if all the old ones could talk. :)
That's a fact, as you can see this is a Remington UMC and a Springfield Armory so I am sure they went through WW1, WW2 and possibly Korea and Vietnam?
 
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Here's my .450 Bushmaster, also pictured in the long gun/AR15 thread. I won this about 8-9 years back in a Guns Magazine monthly giveaway. Trijicon Accupower, Geissele trigger and now a Silencerco Hybrid 46 suppressor. Moose and bears done quietly.
706025

706026

706027
 

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Nice! What's not to love about a semi-auto in7.62 x 54r?
 

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I found something I've been searching for for quite a while...a Colt Sauer Drilling. I've come across them before but the prices were always too high...this I found at an auction and picked it up for a very reasonable cost. I have no practical use for it...just wanted one. Most drillings on the market are in European calibers not easily found here plus the price. This is two 12 gauge barrels over a .30-06 barrel.

I wish I had a better handle on lighting...these pics came out dark. The pics don't do it justice. It would have been nice to set up outside but the lawn is being mowed and there's clouds of pollen and grass clippings and dust setting everywhere.

Colt had a winner with their association with Sauer back in the day...the rifles were superb as is the drilling. I'd love to also find a Weatherby drilling which is identical to this but with Weatherby's name on it. They're each a Sauer Model 3000.









 

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That is magnificently awesome! What a perfect combo as well, two 12 gauge barrels over a .30-06 barrel. Very nice!
 

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Happy Wife, Happy Life. I've managed to save money even while paying credit cards off; so i stopped at my local "favorite" gun shop this morning. I already have a few CZ firearms; including a Model 75, P-09, and Scorpion. There was a bigger (then a Model 75) in the case; maybe one of a dozen handguns (new and used) in the cases. So now I own it; a CZ-97B; 10 round staggered magazine .45 ACP pistol. Red fiber optic front sight, two dot green glow rear sight, thin aluminum checkered grips, a big gun. While not a steal, a "C" Note less than retail.

707552
 

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That's nice! 10 rounds of .45 ought to get the job done.
 

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My Yugoslavian M70AB2 ( AKMS )...








Production History
DesignerZastava Arms
Designed1959–1968
ManufacturerZastava Arsenal
Produced1970–present
# Built4,000,000

Specifications
Weight8.2 lbs
Length37 inches
Barrel Length16.3 inches


Cartridge7.62×39mm
ActionGas-operated (rotating bolt)
Rate of fire620 rounds per minute
Muzzle velocity2,400 fps
Effective firing range450 yds
Feed system30-round AK-47 detachable box magazine / 40-round RPK magazine / 75-round RPK drum magazine
SightsIron sights with flip up tritium night sights / flip up grenade sights


The Zastava M70 (Serbian Cyrillic: Застава М70) is an assault rifle developed and produced by Zastava Arms in Serbia (formerly Yugoslavia). The design of the M70 was based on the Soviet AKM rifle and it became the standard issue weapon in the Yugoslav People's Army in 1970. This weapon is also available as the ZPAPM70 (1.0 stamped receiver), ZPAPM70 Classic (1.5mm stamped receiver with bulged RPK style front trunnion, chrome lined bore), O-PAP (1.5mm stamped receiver with bulged RPK style front trunnion) or N-PAP (1.0mm stamped receiver, standard AKM style front trunnion) in the United States without select fire capabilities.

Development of the domestic Kalashnikov variant began in 1959, and the first models submitted by Zastava for military field trials were with the early M64 (or M59) series of rifles with milled receivers, threaded barrels, familiar Zastava handguards, gas cutoffs for grenade launching, and several other diversities from the mainstay AK design, such as a bolt hold open device on the right side of the receiver, and a charging handle that appeared different from other AK models. Though performances were satisfactory, the Yugoslav military did not adopt the rifle as the standard infantry armament.

In 1970, the green light was given to begin with army-funded mass production of the AP M70 and M70 A series (Automatska Puška Model 1970, "Automatic Rifle Model 1970") of which the M70 A was the folding stock version. It became the standard issue weapon in the Yugoslav People's Army in 1970

Before the larger models of these rifles were made, cost-cutting measures in production resulted in the removal of the internal bolt hold open, and relocation to the magazine follower. This change eliminated any possible speed up in the reloading procedure (due to the bolt closing upon removal of the magazine) but allowed the operator to more easily identify if the current magazine is empty. Some rifles were also equipped with a notched selector control which allowed you to lock the bolt rearward by closing the dust cover on the charging handle.

In addition, the usual placement of the barrel through threading into the receiver was replaced by the cheaper method of pressing and pinning the barrel into the receiver. Rifles produced with these new features were known as models AP M70 B (fixed stock version), and M70 AB (folding stock version). As with the M70 series of automatic rifles, these models failed to be produced in larger quantities before further cost-efficiency production measures gave way to yet another model.

This time the milled receiver was replaced by a receiver stamped from a smooth 0.9 mm (0.04 in) thick sheet of steel, a firing rate reducer was added to the trigger group, and the muzzle brake replaced the muzzle nut that originally came on the two prior models; the produced models were AP M70B1 (fixed stock) and M70 AB1 (folding stock).

These models eventually failed to mass-produce as well, before final alterations to the M70 rifle design resulted in the AP M70 B2 (fixed stock) and M70AB2 (folding stock) models. These last two models featured a thicker 1.5 mm (0.06 in) stamped receiver and bulged front trunnion, which was intended to strengthen the rifle in order to make it more suitable for frequent grenade launching. These two models would become the most widely produced of the M70 series, and, in turn, the most widely used model used by the JNA, as well as the other militaries and various armed groups fighting in the Yugoslav wars of the 1990s. Parts kits imported into the U.S. however, show markings that appear to contradict the final fixed stock model name. On these kits, the bulged, thicker stamped receiver model is actually the M70B1 model.

All of the M70 models share the grenade launching ability with gas cutoff, the lengthened wooden handguard with 3 cooling slots, iron sights with flip-up illuminating elements, initially filled with phosphorus and later with tritium (Which is used on the current production M70's), to improve aiming at night; the plunger that keeps the receiver cover in place during grenade launching, and a non-chrome lined barrel.

The fire selector has J for semi-automatic fire (J for jedinačna, "single"). In the US market, the notched safety lever and bolt hold open magazines have been emulated by many companies as aftermarket accessories for other AKs. There also has been at least one attempt to recreate the original internal bolt stop.

Variants
  • M70 – milled receiver, fixed stock
  • M70A – milled receiver, underfolding stock
  • M70A1 – milled receiver, underfolding stock, mount for night or optical sights
  • M70B1 – stamped receiver, fixed stock
  • M70AB2 – stamped receiver, underfolding stock
  • M70B1N – stamped receiver, fixed stock, mount for night or optical sights
  • M70AB2N – stamped receiver, underfolding stock, mount for night or optical sights
  • M70AB3 – stamped receiver, underfolding stock, rifle grenade sight removed and replaced with a BGP 40 mm underslung grenade launcher
  • M70B3 – stamped receiver, fixed stock, rifle grenade sight removed and replaced with a BGP 40 mm underslung grenade launcher
  • M92 – carbine, the shorter variant of the M70AB2
  • PAP M70 – semi-automatic variant intended for the civilian market
  • Tabuk - Iraqi copy. Bore and chamber are not chrome plated.
  • Tabuk Sniper Rifle – Iraqi long barrel stamped receiver and fixed stock variant
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