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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
OK here goes... found a python 4in bright polished stainless. Rubber finger grove grips. Blue plastic case all the papers. No wood grips.

Serial KT72xx

Printed material has printing dates of 90&91

Has been shot but looks very clean.

What should I look for ?

Whats a reasonable price (they want 1000)?

How old is it ?

I read some talk about the later ones not being as well made is this so ?

I hear that the colts don't hold up under magnum loads,and go out of time. is this so ?

Thank you VERY much

John
 

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Hi John,
Sounds like it is a early 90's gun.
Minty Bright polished Pythons have been dragging around $1300-$1600 out of our pockets in the last couple months.
They actually seem to be the hot ticket right now.
A minty BSS Python for a grand does not sound bad at this time. Especially if it's got papers & a Blue case labeled to match.
If you can nab it for less, that's better too.

Jeff (GUNKWAZY)
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
GUNKRAZY,

Thanks any truth to the concern about later ones (like this one being less well made ?)

Why did the great wood grips give way to the rubber grips ?

Thanks again

John
 

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[ QUOTE ]
Why did the great wood grips give way to the rubber grips ?


[/ QUOTE ]

Just like any other type of production. Cheaper costs make way for new ideas.
The major wheelgun companies all went to the way of rubber. Colt as well as Smith & Wesson. The companies found that service men were taking the wood grips/stocks off and tossing them in the garbage & replacing them with rubber type grips. They found it was a lot cheaper production wise to just outfit their guns with rubber.

As far as a Older production Pythons being any better in quality than a newer production gun, you need to look at each gun on it's own merrits. Period.
All production companies go through tough times and the people that work for them can sometimes be better or worse at doing the quality of work we come to expect out of a name like Colt. That does not mean that a person making $50 an hour will turn out a better product than someone making only $10 an hour. Just like the gun itself, each worker needs to be looked at individually.
The Bluebook of gun values specifies that there's a premium for early model guns. If you watch the auction sites, this tends to be true in some respects. Although I'm seeing some very high numbers coming at auction for MINT unfired examples no matter what year of production.
I hope some of this makes sense for you.

Good luck on your hunt.

Jeff (GUNKWAZY)
 
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