Colt Forum banner

1 - 20 of 36 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,731 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
In the book "Willie Boy, a Desert Manhunt" there are many pictures of the 1909 Mojave Desert posse that trailed him and it looks like every one of them is carrying an 1894 Winchester, mostly carbines. Here's just a couple of the pictures in it. Willie Boy stole a freind's 94 .30-30 carbine and unfortunately proved himself to be an excellent long range shot with it. Pictured is the casing from his last cartridge where he shot himself. He's laying by his carbine. It's interesting how just about every picture of a Texas Ranger in this period shows them with '95 carbines, but this California posse favored 94s. Some of the posse were not lawmen but ranchers, but even the Sheriff and his deputy has a 94. A gun I'd be content with. Willie Boy was not the over glamorized guy portrayed in that ridiculous Robert Redford movie.




 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,469 Posts
I imagine the 1894 Winchester was quite a marvel the first few decades after it's birth from the fertile mind of John Moses Browning. It was slim like an 1892, lightweight and carried well, had more range and power than either an 1873 or an 1892, and didn't give the tell-tale smoke signal of the earlier black powder cartridge rifles ammunition. The 1894 Winchester was and still is a dandy rifle, capable of most chores required of a long arm.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,731 Posts
Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
The Indian tracker who was in the thick of things when ambushed by Willie Boy appears to have a carbine scabbard on his cartridge belt. The guy smiling is the the Banning, CA. constable heading the posse (guess Robert Redford played him) with his deputy brother to his left. The movie couldn't show "Willie Boy" shooting his kidnapped girlfriend because she couldn't keep up with him. That would make him unsympathetic. And the made up suicidal shootout with an unloaded gun against Redford looked more cinematic and noble than him just shooting himself. Willie boy had amazing endurance crisscrossing the desert on foot 600 miles eluding the posse.




 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,469 Posts
The Indian tracker who was in the thick of things when ambushed by Willie boy appears to have a carbine scabbard on his cartridge belt. The guy smiling is the the Banning, CA. constable heading the possee (guess Robert Redford played him) with his deputy brother to his left.




I would carry a 1940 vintage 94 hunting in bad weather and would at times slip the carbine through my belt like, "Mexican carry" revolver if I needed both hands free for climbing or dragging a deer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,923 Posts
I've got an old '94 I inherited when my granpa died in '58 that he carried when he came to Az in 1906,it's seen some hard use.The cal. marking on the bbl. says .30 WCF then just behind that just in front of the receiver is a small paragraph that says "nickle steel bbl. especially for smokeless powder".He was well known in the Yuma,Somerton area for his tracking abilities,when someone went missing he was hired to find them & usually did,he was known by the Az Rangers that worked in that area & they used him once in awhile.When he died the Az Sun newspaper in Yuma wrote a nice article about him along w/a picture of him standing in front of his blacksmith shop in 1909 which I also got w/the rifle.When we found the rifle in his closet it had 3 rds. of silver tip in the magazine.Something else I got was his old walnut rocking chair that he kept from way back then & always sat in,I have no idea how old it is.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,206 Posts
I bought this 94 new in 1956 when I was fifteen. It was my first centerfire rifle. I have many other rifles but this one still remains my favorite. I also have this 95 carbine in 30 army. When I bought it the rear sight was missing. I put on a different sight that fit but the hand guard wont fit over it. The rifle did come from Arizona. I like to fantasize it might have been a Az ranger rifle. Who knows? The 92 44 wcf came off a reservation in the Dakota`s made in 1902. It was stolen off a wall in my house along with many other guns in 2003.


 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,731 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
As long as I am playing show and tell, here is a model 64 made about 1953/1955 that I lucked into years ago. I think it was unfired and I might have put a box or two through it.

My 1911 Model 92 takedown .44 has a pistol grip and shotgun butt. It fit's me better than any rifle, except maybe my Shiloh. I can tell this gun has great point ability.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,206 Posts
Back in the 1950`s my dad and I were deer hunting in northern wisconsin. We came across a hunter that had just missed a nice buck with another nice 64 in .32 special. He blamed the gun. Dad bought it from him on the spot for $50! It had a lyman peep and sling. We gave the guy, a local farmer a ride to his house to pick up a shotgun so he could finish out the day. Through the years dad shot some deer with it. Eventually dad got alzheimers. I went home to find that he had traded that 64 for a Remington 760 in 30/06. I thought he got took but said nothing. I inherited the remington. Dad shot his last nice buck with it at about 87 or 88 years old. I had it in the safe for almost ten years before I got around to trying it out. I was pleasantly surprised! Accurate with that peep! Dad had peep sights on all his centerfire rifles.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,469 Posts
The Model 64 is a favorite of mine, they got everything right on em!

Okay, here's my two antique 1894's. The rifle was a special order from 1898 in .30WCF, the carbine is standard factory also made in 1898. It was a .30WCF also, but the bore has pits large enough to hide a VW Bug! I sent it off to JES Reboring and now it's a very shootable .38-55.

fn86ek3.jpg
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,333 Posts
The Model 64 is a favorite of mine, they got everything right on em!

Okay, here's my two antique 1894's. The rifle was a special order from 1898 in .30WCF, the carbine is standard factory also made in 1898. It was a .30WCF also, but the bore has pits large enough to hide a VW Bug! I sent it off to JES Reboring and now it's a very shootable .38-55.

View attachment 674489
Nice... Very nice. Thanks for sharing them with us all here.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,096 Posts
Here’s my 94 Winchester. Made in 1949, one year younger than me and it is still alive and kicking. Received it for Christmas when I was 14 years old along with a 1917 Enfield.

Deer was shot past December and at 70-75 yards. He traveled less than 15 yards.

B00A55AF-8905-465C-A878-D5CDDBC1A347.jpeg

Joe
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,731 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
Frank Hamer and his good friend here carried 1894s when Hamer first joined the Texas Rangers. These famous early pictures taken (1906) after he killed his first guy as a lawman with his Winchester 30-30. Other pictures that look not too long after this have him posing with a 95 rifle, not carbine.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,064 Posts
What is not to like about a Model 94. Arguably the world's first modern rifle. It has a very long and rich history.
 
1 - 20 of 36 Posts
Top