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Pic borrowed from Vintage Racer since it show it well...what exactly is that little mark on the frame behind the trigger...my old eyes can't make it out...?

 

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Specifically on this gun it appears to be a "B". These are inspector's stamps and should be on every gun. The letters vary, but my observation is they are always a capital letter. I have a 1953 Detective Special stamped with a "W", and a 1974 Govt. Model stamped with a "J" on the left front trigger bow and a "3" stamped on the right front trigger bow.
 

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You'll find the main inspection marks on Colt revolvers:
On the left rear of the trigger guard.
The Colt Verified Proof, (a tiny "VP" in a triangle on the left front of the trigger guard.
And a letter stamp below the serial number on the frame where the cylinder crane seats.
 

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Pic borrowed from Vintage Racer since it show it well...what exactly is that little mark on the frame behind the trigger...my old eyes can't make it out...?
I'm going to offer some sage wisdom from experience ;) Buy yourself a few items: a freestanding lighted magnifying setup (craft folks use em all the time), a double lensed jewelers loupe w/clipon (for either eyeglasses or visor/baseball cap), a good set (not just one) of jewelers tweezers and/or jewelers needle nose pliers. I have found over the years as my eyesight changes that being able to see the fine details and pick up very small parts really takes all the guesswork out of identifying small details and the loupe is invaluable when inspecting a firearm when at a LGS, gun show or neighbors estate sale :)
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I'm going to offer some sage wisdom from experience ;) Buy yourself a few items: a freestanding lighted magnifying setup (craft folks use em all the time), a double lensed jewelers loupe w/clipon (for either eyeglasses or visor/baseball cap), a good set (not just one) of jewelers tweezers and/or jewelers needle nose pliers. I have found over the years as my eyesight changes that being able to see the fine details and pick up very small parts really takes all the guesswork out of identifying small details and the loupe is invaluable when inspecting a firearm when at a LGS, gun show or neighbors estate sale :)
I sold all that stuff to buy the gun.
 
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