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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Among the guns I should get probably rid of is a 1984 Colt Trooper Mark V. Its not unfired, but it is unsold. It was in the inventory of a hardware store with FFL that shut down some years back, and the box is completely worn out from all the times it was taken out of the gun safes to be shown, and then put away.

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There is a light bolt track from being turned and dry fired, but since it was tested at Colt my son and I are the only people who have actually fired it. We didn't take it to the range for a range day of its own. It was just one of a dozen or so revolvers we took out that day. That gun among others was transferred from the gun log to the owner at the time the store shut down, and he gave most of his guns to me some years later. Before anybody says I should keep it I have a lot of guns to remember my dad by and he ain't dead yet. Some I actually have some personal history with. This one has just lived in a gun safe for the last 38 years hoping somebody would take it home. The original retail price was marked on the styrofoam with a blue pen.

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I have looked at TrueGunValue and the prices reported cover quite a spread. I have to assume some of those higher values must be special editions, or year one (1982) models. Maybe some with original box in good condition. LOL.

I'm not completely convinced I want to sell it, but other than being a really nice gun in near new condition (even if the box isn't) I have no connection with it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
I couldn't tell you how many times it was unboxed and fondled by folks who ultimately decided it wasn't in their budget. I personally probably unboxed it for somebody fifty times when I was helping out in the store. Used to crack me up the folks who would want to see it, and then ultimately buy something made by The Ring of Fire instead.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
Which manufacturer is the "ring of fire." I haven't heard that one before.
They were a loosely grouped number of manufacturers who produced very low priced firearms like Jennings and Raven. The ring of fire is supposedly a nickname given to all of those types of companies by the ATF.
 

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They were a loosely grouped number of manufacturers who produced very low priced firearms like Jennings and Raven. The ring of fire is supposedly a nickname given to all of those types of companies by the ATF.
Some of those manufacturers are on the west coast of the U.S. and also include those all around the Pacific Rim, including the Philippines, Indonesia, China and others.
 

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Jennings, Bryco, Raven, Phoenix Arms, Lorcin, Davis, Sundance, Jiminez...

... all frames and slides are made from a base metal called Zamac (zinc alloy) with steel barrels and small parts. The California laws got them out of production in the state by requiring that the melting point of the frames be closer to steel.

Ring of fire = Saturday Night Special

Some are actually reliable shooters, like the Raven .25acp. Lorcin and Davis would crack a slide if you looked at them sideways....
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I think of them more as equal rights guns. Not just for those with money. I personally knew two people who defended themselves with cheap get off me guns made by members of the ring of fire. I know for sure one of them never could have afforded a premium gun. I didn't know the other well enough, but it was just something small they could always easily carry.

However we are getting dangerously close to political and I don't want to get kicked off the forum so soon after joining.

As to reliability we sold a fair number of Jennings and Raven and they were fine... if clean and lubricated (very lightly) for upto about 400-500 rds with some breakin. One fellow I know said his Jennings J-22 started having feed issues at close to 1300 rounds. He used it as a plinker and I sold him multiple bricks. If I bought one because it was all I could afford I'd run a box or two through and just keep it cleaned and lubricated after that.

There were a lot of rules to cut in on the imports too. Size, safeties, then later % of US made parts. There is a Tanfoglio with a two safeties because of all the crazy rules. You might notice a lot of inexpensive import revolvers have safeties. Import rules.
 

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If you have no "connection" to the gun, it is NOT too nice to sell. It's too valuable to keep if you have no connection to it. The market is too hot right now to pass up the chance to sell. Even though the box is too warn to add much to the value, it will still add some value. Too bad it became so worn from that unnecessary action.

I wonder why the gun was taken out of the box and put back time after time. That causes too much wear to the box. Why wasn't the box just set aside and the gun alone displayed and stored in the same manner it always was? We "Box Nuts" take a gun out of its box and it never goes back in, unless it is sold.

I think some gun anti-gun writer coined the phrase "Ring of Fire" back when "Saturday Night Specials" were the evil guns, not "Assault Rifles." The "Ring of Fire" was in California only and lay within 45 miles of downtown Los Angles. In my opinion, the original companies were Bryco, Jennings, Lorcin, Raven, Davis and Phoenix, but one source adds AMT. One source claims all of the above (except AMT) had roots in Raven. Once the term caught on, other companies making inexpensive handguns were added by those campaigning against small, inexpensive handguns.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
We had guns on display at one time, but after a theft and a couple burglaries we stopped displaying them. It did not impact sales for us. We weren't a gun store but all of our customers knew we had guns. If they were interested they asked and they did ask.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I do not recall imported revolvers having safeties. What brands had safeties? Do you mean double-action revolvers? Or do you mean Single Action Army clones with their cylinder pin having a "safety" position?
Go to a local gun stores and ask to see inexpensive 22 revolvers. The first one I remember seeing was FIE with the cross hammer safety.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I had one I recently sent to my cousin (not FIE) with an externally operated hammer safety. Buffalo Scout. (Excam import maybe? I forget.). Lots of cheap import .22 revolvers new with a safety in the local CAL-Ranch store.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Those examples are not double-action revolvers. The reason single action "cowboy" revolvers have "safeties" is to prevent a drop on a hammer above a live round from igniting the primer.
Many have a partial one click cock that does the same thing. Not all single actions have safeties, but all the imports seem to. The old RGs before all the import restrictions did not. I have two of them in the safe.
 

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Never heard of, “Ring of Fire,” except Johnny fell into it. Unclear to me as to derivation of the phrase.
The Ring of Fire is a Geologic (Plate Tectonics) term for the edge of the Pacific Basin due to the large number of very active plate boundaries, huge fault zones, very strong earthquakes and active volcanos.
Map Ecoregion World Line Font
 

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The explanations sound plausible. The only thing that does not fit is that originally the problem guns came from…wait for it….Germany.
 
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