Colt Forum banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,797 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
We've had a few discussions here on reloading and almost to a point I have disagreed with most. With so many children to feed I've had to step it up some from the get go.Back in the early '80s I won a Dillon 550. Prior to that I had a local guy making me bullets and another guy reloading my brass. All that at the rate of 1000 rds per month. Once I got my own reloader and bullets at a discount I was @ 1000 rounds a week 9 months of the year. That went on year in and year out for a couple of decades and I added machines to load on. Mostly Dillon, but RCBS and Hornady came and went s well.I've loaded most common pistol and rifle cartridges. Lots of them in everything between 32-20 and 505 Gibbs. So I like to shoot. In the last couple of years I haven't been able to shoot much because of my health (much better now) and then moving. Moving from a dedicated, well set up shop to a remodeled bay in a 3 car garage has been ...shall we say, "trying?". A year later and still sorting things out I finally have 3 of my 4 Dillon reloaders up and running. Still need to clean up the 550.
All of them have been sitting in our barn with the resulting pigeon/moisture/mouse damage for the past 15 months. Just way too many priorities ahead of them until now. There are two 1050s, a 550 and a Square Deal B. I bought my first 1050 back in 1995 for just under $1000 NIB, delivered. Some of the best shooting related money I have ever spent. I've loaded 9mm, 9x23, 38 Super, 38 Special, 44 Special, 44 Mag, 45 Cowboy, 45 ACP, 45 Colt and .223 on that 1050 reloader. A few years ago I got an unexpected $ bonus and decided a 2nd 1050 would be a real luxury. It is! I've had a 650 as well. Just think the money is better spent on a Square Deal or a 1050 for my own needs.
For those that have wondered the 1050 gives you and immense amount of mechanical leverage, physical room and speed to load factory perfect cartridges. 45 Colt cases are tough for sizing and physical effort in a Square Deal or on single stage. And you could use more room on the Square Deal if you have big hands. (9mm and 45 ACP aare much easier in a Square Deal. But 45 Colt and 44 Special are easy and quick by comparison loaded on a 1050. How fast is a 1050 verse the Square Deal? It takes me just over a minute (1:15 or so) to load 100 primers in a primer tube. It takes me 10 to 15 minutes to load 100 rounds of a anything on a 550. Good, but it takes some effort as well. It takes me right at 5 +/- minutes to load 100 rounds on a 1050.
I still have one heck of a mess to clean up in my new "shop" and eventually organized. But the foundation is in! And I am making ammo again :) This is why I like to reload....my proven, stellar 32-20 recipe with 115gr lead for rifle and pistol :)
I'm living proof even dummies can reload on a progressive. Next time you want to buy a new gun...think about your ammo costs or the time it takes you to reload on a single stage press. And the resulting ease of making a mistake. In a few minutes this morning I loaded 400 rds of 44 Special, and 300 of 45acp. All of them loads I've developed for my own use and shooting. Factory costs? 8 boxes of cheap 44 Special @ $21.00 per 50? $168 6 boxes of cheap 45 acp @ $13 per 50? $78. How much factory ammo does it take to make the trade off for progressive reloader? Reloader, lube, bullets, primers, primer tray, powder and brass. A decent set of scales, tumbler, and screen to clean with. Done.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,826 Posts
I tell my wife that all the time but that's a different subject altogether. ;-)
 

·
*** ColtForum MVP ***
Joined
·
15,616 Posts
Like a lot of people, I reloaded in self-defense....I couldn't afford to shoot much if I didn't.
For me reloading was a chore not a hobby, and I didn't do any experimenting. I usually selected the lower velocity most economical load since I shot for fun and practice.

A fact about reloading is that you will not save ANY MONEY, but you'll shoot a LOT more.

My buddy and I bought an early Dillon, which I think it was the first Dillon to be commercially sold, and it was a very early one.
This was a revelation since we were only used to the old RCBS turret press that took forever to use.

My buddy moved on to a Dillon 550 and uses it to load pistol and most shorter range accuracy rifle practice ammo.
Dillon claims that you can load full-on Match grade ammo on the Dillon and I believe that.
The automatic powder drop is very accurate.
We were once loading some M1 Rifle ammo for a DCM match and were using a RCBS powder measure.
We got a variation in the powder accuracy depending on which of us was operating the measure.
The Dillon eliminates that.

I no longer reload but if I was buying a reloader, it'd be a Dillon.
My buddy had little trouble with it, and when he did Dillon really took care of him, usually sending out a new powder measure or part, and never asking the old one to be returned.

Dillon started the whole individual progressive loader market and I think still makes the best one.
Before Dillon the progressive loader was a very expensive Star loader that was used by a lot of big gun clubs and police departments to load practice ammo.
When converted to hydraulic operation every time you stepped on a peddle a loaded round was ejected out the end of the device.
Not many individuals could afford a Star.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
227 Posts
When I stil shot Cowboy Action I did all my loading of a single stage press...still do for the most part. It's very time consuming without a doubt. For the most part I find reloading a good way to relax but I want to shoot more than I've had time to load. My shooting partner thankfully has a 550 that we've been able to feed my .38 Specials with but I've got to up my game on .45 Colt, .41 Mag and a few others. I was gifted a Hornady progressive loader last year. This post is the ass quick I need to get that Hornady producing!

Yahoody, the 73, that a short rifle with a shotgun butt? Who's offering and caliber?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,167 Posts
Like a lot of people, I reloaded in self-defense....I couldn't afford to shoot much if I didn't.
For me reloading was a chore not a hobby, and I didn't do any experimenting. I usually selected the lower velocity most economical load since I shot for fun and practice.

A fact about reloading is that you will not save ANY MONEY, but you'll shoot a LOT more.

My buddy and I bought an early Dillon, which I think it was the first Dillon to be commercially sold, and it was a very early one.
This was a revelation since we were only used to the old RCBS turret press that took forever to use.

My buddy moved on to a Dillon 550 and uses it to load pistol and most shorter range accuracy rifle practice ammo.
Dillon claims that you can load full-on Match grade ammo on the Dillon and I believe that.
The automatic powder drop is very accurate.
We were once loading some M1 Rifle ammo for a DCM match and were using a RCBS powder measure.
We got a variation in the powder accuracy depending on which of us was operating the measure.
The Dillon eliminates that.

I no longer reload but if I was buying a reloader, it'd be a Dillon.
My buddy had little trouble with it, and when he did Dillon really took care of him, usually sending out a new powder measure or part, and never asking the old one to be returned.

Dillon started the whole individual progressive loader market and I think still makes the best one.
Before Dillon the progressive loader was a very expensive Star loader that was used by a lot of big gun clubs and police departments to load practice ammo.
When converted to hydraulic operation every time you stepped on a peddle a loaded round was ejected out the end of the device.
Not many individuals could afford a Star.
Back when I used to shoot combat in nazifornia before it became IPSC the shooting team I shot w/had 4 stars set up in one place,a .45 acp-.45 colt-.mine a .44 spcl.& lastly a .38.About 20 yrs or more ago the owners of Star came over to my place in Cave Creek w/a pair of Colts that had been sent back to colt 3 times for repair along w/all the paper work that described what they had done w/them & they still wouldn't work right.[probably during the strike] they were in their camper & went over to Wickenburg & camped there for 3 days & when they came back I had the 2 colts fixed & waiting for them .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,797 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
buffhuntr said:
.....the 73, that a short rifle with a shotgun butt? Who's offering and caliber?
The half mag '73? It is a gun I built with a 23" Shilen match barrel 30 years ago. Barrel is profiled a medium heavy built on a old Uberti receiver, was a 44-40 originally then I chambered it in .45 Colt using a new lifter and changed that again to run .45 Cowboy (held 11 rounds in the mag with Cowboy brass and that sport mag tube) before changing it back to .45 Colt again as you see it. Still has a crescent butt I just added a lace on butt cuff to make it a shotgun. Side plates are hand engraved, receiver, butt plate and forearm cap are finished in bright nickel. Checkered wood I got from Uberti. Gun is back now to plain jane wood and no butt cuff. Love how the thing swings. Built it in the days you could shoot SASS with a 6 round rifle and one handgun. Those days are long gone :)

Jim Martin said:
Back when I used to shoot combat in nazifornia before it became IPSC the shooting team I shot w/had 4 stars set up in one place,a .45 acp-.45 colt-.mine a .44 spcl.& lastly a .38.
Forgot about Star machines until they were mentioned here. Figured you loaded on one bitd. Nice!

Down side to a BIG progressive machine? You run out of bullets or brass pretty quickly. Then you have to change calibers or buy more bullets, powder, primers, brass if you want to continue the speed and limit the effort. Something primeval about having lots of ammo tucked away though if you like to shoot :) I find there is never enough ammo!

Avoid it at all costs, cuz nothing worse than post ammo depression.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
I love my 550B. I found it simple (but expensive) to buy a new tool head, powder measure, and stand for each caliber I regularly reload. Then I only need to swap out base plates and primer tubes to swap calibers.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top