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The bar fight and ending gunfight in Culpepper Cattle Company oughta get at least honorable mention.
yeah, one of my favorite westerns. Around 1972 when I was 16 I was babysitting my 5 year old nephew and took him to the movies. It was “The Wild Bunch” and ” The Culpepper Cattle Company”. What a great double feature! Me and my nephew survived all that violence just fine. I put fake pearl grips on my Single Six back then because I liked Geoffrey Lewis’ gun so much in Cullpepper.
 

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“ We want Angel”

Wild Bunch. 1969
We could do a whole 'nother multi-page thread on The Wild Bunch and the various themes running throughout the film. It isn't only about a getting-old bunch of outlaws in the early part of the 20th Century. And the film, itself, is a lot more than just innovative (at the time) editing and camera work. Honesty, loyalty, betrayal, heroism, cowardice...those are all skillfully woven into the film, as are more thematic concepts.

There was some strangeness associated with one of the actors in the film. Albert Dekker, who played Harrigan, the railroad guy, had been an accomplished actor for decades who actually died before the film was officially released. And he starred in one of my favorite science-fiction-horror "B" movies, Dr. Cyclops. The circumstances of his death were...shall we say...somewhat bizarre. Watching him in the film, it's hard to imagine. Click here if you're interested in reading about him.

The film did make William Holden a movie star all over again, that's for sure, and definitely gave a big boost to Borgnine's fading career. Borgnine really didn't get enough credit for the way he played that role, in my opinion. Holden, by the way, did not want to wear a mustache to play Pike, but when Peckinpah said wear it or else, Holden gave in because he really wanted the part.

But yeah, The Wild Bunch...classic gunplay throughout. Was it really fifty-two years ago? Jeez, where has my life gone?

Smile Photograph White Hat Cap
 

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This one was a little different. In “The Violent Men” Glenn Ford fights psychologically by making his adversaries underestimate him. In the final gunfight a very cool Brian Keith starts fanning from too far away when Ford carefully aims and kills him. In this scene one of my favorite actors in westerns Richard Jaeckel misjudges Ford….

 

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We could do a whole 'nother multi-page thread on The Wild Bunch and the various themes running throughout the film. It isn't only about a getting-old bunch of outlaws in the early part of the 20th Century. And the film, itself, is a lot more than just innovative (at the time) editing and camera work. Honesty, loyalty, betrayal, heroism, cowardice...those are all skillfully woven into the film, as are more thematic concepts.

There was some strangeness associated with one of the actors in the film. Albert Dekker, who played Harrigan, the railroad guy, had been an accomplished actor for decades who actually died before the film was officially released. And he starred in one of my favorite science-fiction-horror "B" movies, Dr. Cyclops. The circumstances of his death were...shall we say...somewhat bizarre. Watching him in the film, it's hard to imagine. Click here if you're interested in reading about him.

The film did make William Holden a movie star all over again, that's for sure, and definitely gave a big boost to Borgnine's fading career. Borgnine really didn't get enough credit for the way he played that role, in my opinion. Holden, by the way, did not want to wear a mustache to play Pike, but when Peckinpah said wear it or else, Holden gave in because he really wanted the part.

But yeah, The Wild Bunch...classic gunplay throughout. Was it really fifty-two years ago? Jeez, where has my life gone?

View attachment 767306
Tell me about it.....longer from this film to now than from WWI to this film...... believe I heard that Sam was impressed by filming techniques used in Bonnie & Clyde
 

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My pick for best western of all time would be "High Plains Drifter". When the guy gets his ear shot off is probably my favorite scene in the movie.
 

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My pick for best western of all time would be "High Plains Drifter". When the guy gets his ear shot off is probably my favorite scene in the movie.
The bar fight and ending gunfight in Culpepper Cattle Company oughta get at least honorable mention.
Here it is. This movie combines gritty realism with low slung holsters, but I don’t mind a bit. A guy from Barney Miller gets killed.

 

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This one was a little different. In “The Violent Men” Glenn Ford fights psychologically by making his adversaries underestimate him. In the final gunfight a very cool Brian Keith starts fanning from too far away when Ford carefully aims and kills him. In this scene one of my favorite actors in westerns Richard Jaeckel misjudges Ford….

"The Fastest Gun Alive" was another good Glenn Ford western. Loved his Tom Sunday in "The Sackett's"
 

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We could do a whole 'nother multi-page thread on The Wild Bunch and the various themes running throughout the film. It isn't only about a getting-old bunch of outlaws in the early part of the 20th Century. And the film, itself, is a lot more than just innovative (at the time) editing and camera work. Honesty, loyalty, betrayal, heroism, cowardice...those are all skillfully woven into the film, as are more thematic concepts.

There was some strangeness associated with one of the actors in the film. Albert Dekker, who played Harrigan, the railroad guy, had been an accomplished actor for decades who actually died before the film was officially released. And he starred in one of my favorite science-fiction-horror "B" movies, Dr. Cyclops. The circumstances of his death were...shall we say...somewhat bizarre. Watching him in the film, it's hard to imagine. Click here if you're interested in reading about him.

The film did make William Holden a movie star all over again, that's for sure, and definitely gave a big boost to Borgnine's fading career. Borgnine really didn't get enough credit for the way he played that role, in my opinion. Holden, by the way, did not want to wear a mustache to play Pike, but when Peckinpah said wear it or else, Holden gave in because he really wanted the part.

But yeah, The Wild Bunch...classic gunplay throughout. Was it really fifty-two years ago? Jeez, where has my life gone?

View attachment 767306
Decker's death was bizarre, and I was reminded of Bob Crane's mysterious end. Thanks for the link.
 

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Font Gesture Poster Publication Book




"The Wild Bunch" Is the best western ever made imo. The book (above) by W.K. Stratton- about the film and the people involved in it is quite good. If you like the movie you might enjoy the book. Peckinpah was kind of a mad genius. . To damn bad he took it to far with the booze etc. Who knows what he would have came up with if he had kept his faculties and made more films.

"They? WTH is they!???"
Etc.. great stuff-

I have seen T.W.B. to damn many times lol. And never get tired of it.

David Carradine- was another actor who met a strange fate
 

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View attachment 767353



"The Wild Bunch" Is the best western ever made imo. The book (above) by W.K. Stratton- about the film and the people involved in it is quite good. If you like the movie you might enjoy the book. Peckinpah was kind of a mad genius. . To damn bad he took it to far with the booze etc. Who knows what he would have came up with if he had kept his faculties and made more films.

"They? WTH is they!???"
Etc.. great stuff-

I have seen T.W.B. to damn many times lol. And never get tired of it.

David Carradine- was another actor who met a strange fate
You might like this. L.Q. Jones, now 94, had a very catchy real name that I think he should have kept. “Justus McQueen”. Here he and Bo Hopkins discuss the film. My favorite character actor of all time, Strother Martin, died long ago. Just think, in 1969 he was in ”True Grit“, “‘the Wild Bunch”, and “Butch Cassidy..”. And each character were as diverse from each other as you could get.
 

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There's a documentary on the making of The Wild Bunch narrated by Kris Kristofferson that is also good.
I've watched The Wild Bunch so many times I can almost recite the dialog.
My parents had to take me to see it. A friend in high school and me would go to the movies as he was a big Clint Eastwood fan.
So, one Saturday afternoon we drive down to Miami from Ft. Lauderdale to see a double feature Dirty Harry and The Wild Bunch. We sat in the front row and when Mapache cuts Angels throught we both looked at each other to see if we were covered in blood, very vivid up close.

Another excellent shootout that we've missed is the end of Ride the High Country.
"Where's the rifle"
"It's on the horse"
 

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"Ride the High Country" is a much underrated western...not so much on action as it is on story and acting performances. Both Randolph Scott and Joel McCrea turned in sterling acting jobs.

One of the more profound statements is "All I want is to enter my House justified." A great thought on how to live one's life.
 

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There's a documentary on the making of The Wild Bunch narrated by Kris Kristofferson that is also good.
I've watched The Wild Bunch so many times I can almost recite the dialog.
My parents had to take me to see it. A friend in high school and me would go to the movies as he was a big Clint Eastwood fan.
So, one Saturday afternoon we drive down to Miami from Ft. Lauderdale to see a double feature Dirty Harry and The Wild Bunch. We sat in the front row and when Mapache cuts Angels throught we both looked at each other to see if we were covered in blood, very vivid up close.

Another excellent shootout that we've missed is the end of Ride the High Country.
"Where's the rifle"
"It's on the horse"
Dirty Harry and The Wild Bunch?! What a great double feature for guys like us, or what helped create guys like us. Besides two A list films, in those days you could stay in the theater and watch them again if you wanted. I had fifty cent allowance in the late ‘60s and we went to the movies every weekend. In ‘67 when I was ten, the Bonnie & Clyde ending to me was like your Wild Bunch experience was to you with all that carnage.
 

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The shootout in “Wild Bill” that is in the very first part of the movie in a traders bar.
 
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