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I now have a new movie to watch “Old Henry”. How did I miss that one? Thanks y’all.

The talk of the shootout in the woods made me think of “Bad Company”. Surprised that one hadn’t come up yet, I thought it was a great movie.

 

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Well, as earlier posted, Lee Marvin gets my vote in Monte Walsh, perhaps the best movie made about the cowboy way of life & it's short span of less than 30 years but the cowboy took pride in what he did. If it couldn't be done on the back of a horse, he wasn't interested. Many who worked for honest wages but lost his job as a cowboy had to resort to jumping the fence & go to the dark side in order to live. Lee's portrayal of Monte was a believable role & some memorable lines like I rode the gray down, after he shot Shorty who had gone to the dark side. The gray pertained to a killer bronc that no one could tame during the days they rode for the brand. After Monte came to his senses about joining a Wild West show to make ends meet, He walked out & saw the bronc that had been sold to the show Monte had a belt too many & walked over to the bronc sweet talked it while he put on the saddle & mounted and the horse just stood there then all of a sudden came alive and the pair almost tore up the town but he broke it then turn it back to the pen. Tom Selleck made a remake but as much as I like Selleck in a western there is only one real Monte Walsh & that is Lee Marvn
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Well, as earlier posted, Lee Marvin gets my vote in Monte Walsh, perhaps the best movie made about the cowboy way of life & it's short span of less than 30 years but the cowboy took pride in what he did. If it couldn't be done on the back of a horse, he wasn't interested. Many who worked for honest wages but lost his job as a cowboy had to resort to jumping the fence & go to the dark side in order to live. Lee's portrayal of Monte was a believable role & some memorable lines like I rode the gray down, after he shot Shorty who had gone to the dark side. The gray pertained to a killer bronc that no one could tame during the days they rode for the brand. After Monte came to his senses about joining a Wild West show to make ends meet, He walked out & saw the bronc that had been sold to the show Monte had a belt too many & walked over to the bronc sweet talked it while he put on the saddle & mounted and the horse just stood there then all of a sudden came alive and the pair almost tore up the town but he broke it then turn it back to the pen. Tom Selleck made a remake but as much as I like Selleck in a western there is only one real Monte Walsh & that is Lee Marvn View attachment 767653
[/QUOTETfirst Monte Walsh
Well, as earlier posted, Lee Marvin gets my vote in Monte Walsh, perhaps the best movie made about the cowboy way of life & it's short span of less than 30 years but the cowboy took pride in what he did. If it couldn't be done on the back of a horse, he wasn't interested. Many who worked for honest wages but lost his job as a cowboy had to resort to jumping the fence & go to the dark side in order to live. Lee's portrayal of Monte was a believable role & some memorable lines like I rode the gray down, after he shot Shorty who had gone to the dark side. The gray pertained to a killer bronc that no one could tame during the days they rode for the brand. After Monte came to his senses about joining a Wild West show to make ends meet, He walked out & saw the bronc that had been sold to the show Monte had a belt too many & walked over to the bronc sweet talked it while he put on the saddle & mounted and the horse just stood there then all of a sudden came alive and the pair almost tore up the town but he broke it then turn it back to the pen. Tom Selleck made a remake but as much as I like Selleck in a western there is only one real Monte Walsh & that is Lee Marvn View attachment 767653
Monte Walsh (this one) is one of my all time favorites, too. I associate it with “Will Penny” because they’re both early ‘70s westerns made to look and feel very authentic. So did “McCabe And Mrs Miller”. I really liked the extended ending story line in the Tom Selleck version of Monte Walsh, but I like the original much more.
 

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Funny you should mention Ride the High Country. Here's something to ponder about that film.

Released seven years before The Wild Bunch, it was also directed by Sam Peckinpah. It's often considered Peckinpah's first truly great film. So think about this. Both films are about over-the-hill men in the early part of the 20th Century. Except in this case Joel McCrea plays an ex-lawman.

And note how McCrea looks and dresses in the film. He's pretty much an early version of William Holden in the later film. Only thing missing is the mustache. And McCrea's character even employs some of the same looks and gestures that Holden did later in The Wild Bunch. They look enough alike to be brothers.

And Peckinpah changed the whole shooting script around. You know how, in The Wild Bunch, even though the audience sees Holden's bunch as the good guys (even though they're outlaws), all the good guys die in the end. In Ride the High Country, the original script called for just the bad guys to die in the shootout. Peckinpah changed it around so that McCrea's character dies in the end, adding a whole 'nother level to the film and making it even more successful. The film was McCrea's and Scott's last major role. Matter of fact, Randolph Scott retired after completing the film. I guess he wanted to quit while he was ahead.

In spite of a few critically acclaimed westerns in the fifties, the genre was about as dead as a strung up cattle rustler. Most westerns by then were mostly "B" movies (my opinion). With Ride the High Country, Peckinpah sort of resurrected the genre and gave it back the depth and meaning of the real Old West. And after Ride the High Country, The Wild Bunch, and the early Clint Eastwood westerns, every movie studio on the planet was looking to make "cowboy movies".

Randolph Scott, by the way, is buried just about three miles from my house.

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Joel McCrea was a close friend of my Dad, Joel's ranch bordered the ranch my Dad was on and I can remember as a small child going with Dad to help Joel brand his calves. Joel was a genuine cowboy and horseman and what you see on screen was the real person.
 

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They are all fun to watch and fantasize on . If I needed that kind of stuff done , I'd ambush as he came out of his house scathing his ass :sneaky:. Movies , don't you just love um .
 

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That final shootout in the cemetery (The Good, The Bad and The Ugly) was exceptional simply due to the long buildup of breathless tension excellently created by the director. Shane and Wilson, of course. The final saloon shootout in The Shootist. The Wild Bunch, oh yes. Clint Eastwood's saloon shootout in Unforgiven was realistic and tough to top.
 

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Joel McCrea was a close friend of my Dad, Joel's ranch bordered the ranch my Dad was on and I can remember as a small child going with Dad to help Joel brand his calves. Joel was a genuine cowboy and horseman and what you see on screen was the real person.
How cool is that?!?! My Dad worked in some of the old ranches way back in the day and he said the same about Jim Gillette. I’d never heard that about Joel McRae. Thanks for sharing that.
 

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Joel McCrea was a close friend of my Dad, Joel's ranch bordered the ranch my Dad was on and I can remember as a small child going with Dad to help Joel brand his calves. Joel was a genuine cowboy and horseman and what you see on screen was the real person.
That's really cool. He's one of my favorite actors.
 

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Monte Walsh (this one) is one of my all time favorites, too. I associate it with “Will Penny” because they’re both early ‘70s westerns made to look and feel very authentic. So did “McCabe And Mrs Miller”. I really liked the extended ending story line in the Tom Selleck version of Monte Walsh, but I like the original much more.
Have not seen the original I'll have to find it.
 

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Have not seen the original I'll have to find it.
I found one years ago but had to pay top dollar for it. Today, I think you can find them more reasonable, For years, they never showed it & I don't understand why. Try finding the original soundtrack for the movie. I found one but it too was expensive. Maybe today it is more accessible.
 

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That's what makes the world go around. It would be a dull one if everyone
thought the same. Like True Grit, I preferred the remake w/ Jeff Bridges as the movie followed the book much closer & the movie just had a feel to it that seemed realistic. No offense to John Wayne fans as I am one, but the first one was done by Hollywood although I wonder why wooly chaps were written in for Ned Pepper in both as that was in Arkansas. I can see wooly chaps in Montana but have not seen them on cowboys down under Wyoming
 

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That's what makes the world go around. It would be a dull one if everyone
thought the same. Like True Grit, I preferred the remake w/ Jeff Bridges as the movie followed the book much closer & the movie just had a feel to it that seemed realistic. No offense to John Wayne fans as I am one, but the first one was done by Hollywood although I wonder why wooly chaps were written in for Ned Pepper in both as that was in Arkansas. I can see wooly chaps in Montana but have not seen them on cowboys down under Wyoming
Yep, Canine cop, think you’re right on carbon copy thinking. I like parts of the True Grit re-make, and parts of the original. Not a final shoot-out, but i think it was Waterhole #3 where James Coburn’s character was challenged by a “Gunman” who told Coburn he’d see him in the street outside. Coburn finished his drink, walked out of the saloon and behind a horse tied to the rail, pulled out the rifle in the scabbard and shot the waiting gunman fifty feet away. Not particularly sporting, but a better twist to the movie standard of two or several good guys in the street facing the bad guys.
Jim
 

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Well, he missed my favorites.

Best: Jake/Kevin Costner's shootout at the Saloon in Silverado

Runner Up: The "everybody could shoot" shootout in Appaloosa.

I am glad they mentioned "Shane".

Hat tip to the Magnificent Seven climax, but there are several shootouts in the scene and it is hard to pick a single favorite. As an entire scene, it is epic.
 
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