Colt Forum banner
1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks I bought this 6" SS new in '95 put about 20 rounds though it and had a good friend keep in his safe until I got a safe of my own. I know he moved the safe several times . At least it was the blank end!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,343 Posts
Thanks I bought this 6" SS new in '95 put about 20 rounds though it and had a good friend keep in his safe until I got a safe of my own. I know he moved the safe several times . At least it was the blank end!
Tobyone, something I have made a practice of... always open your Colt boxes from the non-labeled end, and as seldom as possible. Depending on the model and configuration, maintaining your Colt box might save you hundreds or thousands.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,449 Posts
'Hundreds or thousands' is going to be a bit of a reach, unless cheaply-produced cardboard becomes the deciding factor in purchasing over the weapon itself and the condition that said piece is actually in.

Especially for modern stuff.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,449 Posts
In general, a factory letter doesn't add value to any modern production piece - the vast majority of them never did anything noteworthy, unless they rode in a LEO's holster, or with a noted hunter.

Folks are paying for information they already possess if they kept the receipt, so I fail to see any 'added value' in the knowledge that a new stainess revolver was made in February and shipped in May.

They're getting letters because they see older, established collectors doing so for actually collectible pieces that 'may' have some particular history attached, and they think they need to do so, as well - because, well, after all - 'it's a Colt'.

Most folks lettering a piece are hoping that it didn't go to a big hardware supplier, but so many, many did - so they're gambling.

Thousands of factory letters have already been generated on weapons that lost their original boxes decades earlier.

The whole 'box cult' thing is a new phenomenon.

Colt's cardboard boxes with the styrofoam inserts aren't as durable as Kleenex boxes - and cardboard does deteriorate and loses structural integrity when flexed.

Buy the piece and put the box, receipt and papers away - and store the weapon separately.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,343 Posts
'Hundreds or thousands' is going to be a bit of a reach, unless cheaply-produced cardboard becomes the deciding factor in purchasing over the weapon itself and the condition that said piece is actually in.

Especially for modern stuff.
Here are some photos of a few of my "modern" one owner NIB Colts which are complete and in new, factory test fired only, condition. In today's market each of these "packages", would suffer significantly in value if its box label were not a part of the evaluation or sale. All of this packaging would be relatively worthless if it could not be identified as being the firearm's original factory box, paperwork, desiccant paper, plastic, etc. One could no longer have the advantage of owning or selling a "NIB" Colt. It is the label that connects these items of packaging to the firearm, and collectors pay significant premiums when it is all there and all authentic.

The Colts that I have shown below are of rather common configurations (except the Combat Pythons). Certain configurations of Pythons would benefit in the many thousands of dollars by having with it, the original box, box label and paperwork. Any 3" model of Python would fall into this category. The more rare versions, like the Wilkerson/Carroll Combat Python, or a Nickel 3" Standard Production Python would fall into the category of many, many, thousands of added value when its original packaging is all there.

I may be conservative in these estimates of premium for the packaging. It could be a good conversation, in another thread perhaps.

Hundreds:







A Thousand or More:










Many Thousands (I do not own these):

Lew Horton Combat Python:



Wilkerson/Carroll Combat Python (I would guess $5000 at a minimum):

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,870 Posts
Here are some photos of a few of my "modern" one owner NIB Colts which are complete and in new, factory test fired only, condition. In today's market each of these "packages", would suffer significantly in value if its box label were not a part of the evaluation or sale. All of this packaging would be relatively worthless if it could not be identified as being the firearm's original factory box, paperwork, desiccant paper, plastic, etc. One could no longer have the advantage of owning or selling a "NIB" Colt. It is the label that connects these items of packaging to the firearm, and collectors pay significant premiums when it is all there and all authentic.

The Colts that I have shown below are of rather common configurations (except the Combat Pythons). Certain configurations of Pythons would benefit in the many thousands of dollars by having with it, the original box, box label and paperwork. Any 3" model of Python would fall into this category. The more rare versions, like the Wilkerson/Carroll Combat Python, or a Nickel 3" Standard Production Python would fall into the category of many, many, thousands of added value when its original packaging is all there.

I may be conservative in these estimates of premium for the packaging. It could be a good conversation, in another thread perhaps.

Hundreds:







A Thousand or More:










Many Thousands (I do not own these):

Lew Horton Combat Python:



Wilkerson/Carroll Combat Python (I would guess $5000 at a minimum):

Excellent Colts.

That is some nice engraving on that 6" nickel, Kanatak. Did you order that one?

Digging that blue on that early Python!
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top