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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 6" Colt Trooper MKV that supposedly had only been shot by the factory. I wasn't going to shoot it but I gave in to curiosity and shot maybe 100 rounds through it. What I noticed was the trigger sometimes didn't want to return without hanging up and sticking. A little movement of the trigger and it would release to full forward position. I am wondering could the internals be gunked up with hard grease from the factory since it supposedly hadn't been shot much if at all? Is the side plate difficult to remove to check it out?

The trigger is nice but it isn't Python trigger good. Maybe it will improve after cleaning it up inside.
 

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I think you're correct in thinking the guts are gummed up. The factory puts lube in there but it hardens with age...they never built it to sit in the box for so many years...they built it to shoot with cleaning and preventive maintenance. Take off the stocks and get a good gun cleaning aerosol spray and spray it thoroughly and allow it time to drain and dry. I wouldn't remove the side plate unless it was necessary.

If the trigger isn't as nice as you think it should be, there's no gunsmithing that can be done due to its design. Buy a Wolff's spring kit (about $10 or so) for a Mark V/Anaconda/King Cobra with a lighter weight mainspring. Follow the instructions and it's pretty simple and straightforward "action job". BTW...it would require removing the side plate which requires being careful. While the side plate is off you can put some fresh lube on wear points.
 

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A colt DA WILL hang up! Unload gun, pull trigger and slooowly return the trigger. just before its fully forward try to pull the trigger back again DA. You will see what I am saying. Under normal use you wont notice it but if you are shooting fast DA and don't let the trigger quite fully forward it will happen. 99 out of a 100 people will ever notice this except by accident.
Edit: I don't know if it will on the newer Mark action. Didnt notice your picture untill after I posted. I am talking about the older Python and OP older original trooper actions.
 

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I think you're correct in thinking the guts are gummed up. The factory puts lube in there but it hardens with age...they never built it to sit in the box for so many years...they built it to shoot with cleaning and preventive maintenance. Take off the stocks and get a good gun cleaning aerosol spray and spray it thoroughly and allow it time to drain and dry. I wouldn't remove the side plate unless it was necessary.

If the trigger isn't as nice as you think it should be, there's no gunsmithing that can be done due to its design. Buy a Wolff's spring kit (about $10 or so) for a Mark V/Anaconda/King Cobra with a lighter weight mainspring. Follow the instructions and it's pretty simple and straightforward "action job". BTW...it would require removing the side plate which requires being careful. While the side plate is off you can put some fresh lube on wear points.
I'd say that's right. Not only does the factory grease gum up, I have also seen guns packed full of nasty grease that was put in there after the gun left the factory. Hose it out with gun cleaner or brake cleaner, then give it a good dose of WD-40 or Kroil, work the action to make it penetrate and blow out the excess with compressed air. The best thing to do is to take it apart and clean the internals thoroughly, it's not all that difficult but it takes a good manual if you haven't done it before. Also, the side plates on the V/MM frames are a bit tricky to reinstall properly, so I'd try the "hose out" treatment first of all.
 

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Hose it out with gun cleaner or brake cleaner, then give it a good dose of WD-40 or Kroil, work the action to make it penetrate and blow out the excess with compressed air.
I would stick with de-chlorinated brake cleaner or Gun Scrubber followed by a quick shot of G96 or Kroil to leave a thin coat of lubricant on the internals. I would avoid WD-40 for the internals. It will eventually gum up the works even more and make the gun unusable over time if left in there.
 

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If the trigger isn't as nice as you think it should be, there's no gunsmithing that can be done due to its design.
I don't believe that is correct for the MKV, although true for the MkIII. The MKV has a machined trigger and hammer block, so it can be honed.
However, odds are old grease is the problem here.
 

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You might be correct...not sure. I do believe the Mark V action has investment cast triggers and hammers...not machined from bar stock. The Mark III used sintered metal. Maybe someone with better knowledge can tell us for sure.
 
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I would stick with de-chlorinated brake cleaner or Gun Scrubber followed by a quick shot of G96 or Kroil to leave a thin coat of lubricant on the internals. I would avoid WD-40 for the internals. It will eventually gum up the works even more and make the gun unusable over time if left in there.
I believe most any oils will gum up if you leave them in there long enough, with a possible exception for synthetic oils. The reason why I mentioned WD-40 is that it's readily available, but my weapon of choice is Kroil. However, the major problem I have found is excessive lubrication, it attracts dirt and grit which will eventually turn it into a black, sticky goo that makes the action sluggish. I only use a few drops of oil when I assemble a revolver, and some people even assemble them dry. This can be done on tuned revolvers where all the parts have a fine, polished surface, and after some break-in they will be slicker than a standard gun full of oil.

You might be correct...not sure. I do believe the Mark V action has investment cast triggers and hammers...not machined from bar stock. The Mark III used sintered metal. Maybe someone with better knowledge can tell us for sure.
I have a Mk V in the shop right now, the trigger and hammer have a nice, well defined look to them and as far as I can tell they are machined from steel stock. When I polish the cast parts in stainless guns, I grind the surfaces first to make them perfectly flat. It's almost scary to see how wavy they are, they usually have deep sink marks, ejection marks, lots of casting "flash" etc. and getting them straightened up is very labor intensive. I doubt that Colt would go through all that, especially if you look at the ham handed job they did when polishing them for BSTS guns.

If I had to make a fairly educated guess based on the appearance, the blued guns (including the early King Cobras) came with machined triggers and hammers. The cast material is pretty darn difficult to prep for bluing, and I don't even know if they can be blued with good results.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
I put some Ultra Lube II oil down into the trigger and hammer areas. The trigger seems better dry firing now and isn't hanging up. If I have any more problems with it then I will spray cleaner down inside the gun and lube it back up. I find the Ultra Lube II is excellent lubrication for all my guns. I have a video of a ball bearing test an it out protected other gun oils that were tested. Ultra Lube II penetrates the metal. I think when I run out of it I am going to try synthetic transmission fluid. I am so much a believer in synthetic oil over dino oil.
I sort of suspect Ultima Lube II is possibly a synthetic blend oil since it is red.
 

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First check is to look to see if the trigger return spring has been replaced or altered.
In the later Colt's that's the usual cause of failure to return. The stock trigger spring is stout enough that the gun would need to be really packed with grease.
Many people used to the S&W trigger feel wanted a lighter pull on the later Colt's so they either installed a spring kit or altered the stock trigger return spring.
Often you get trigger return failures with altered springs, and once in a while with a replacement spring.

After the Mark III all later Colt revolvers like the Mark V and King Cobra had cast steel hammers and triggers, but all other internal parts were still sintered steel or possibly MIM in very late guns like the Anaconda.

Since the hammers and triggers are cast steel they should be smooth enough not to need any polishing. Cast parts have very little machining needed so the critical working surfaces have no rough machine marks. So, polishing (smoothing) won't help something that's already smooth.
One caution is, I don't know how Colt heat treated these later cast hammers and triggers. Whether they're surface case hardened or through-hardened and the same hardness all the way though is something you need to know before any work on them.
If, like the sintered steel Mark III parts the later parts are surface hardened, polishing would run a high risk of breaking through.

I'm going to go with Jerry Kuhnhausen on this one. He warns NOT to do any alterations or polishing on any of the later Colt revolvers, including the Mark V and King Cobra.

Precede at your own risk, keeping in mind that new hammers and triggers are getting hard to get and expensive.
 
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