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Discussion Starter #1
Hi,
I have a Pocket Positive from 1920 and sadly I broke the pin that sits on the frame and pivots the trigger. Since I live in a gun-unfriendly country and good gunsmiths are hard to find here, is there any way I could replace that pin at home? And does the trigger pin from the Police Positive fit into the Pocket Positive?
Thanks in advance.
 

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I'm not all that up on the older models, but as I recall the frame pins are pressed in.

The Police Positive trigger pin "should" interchange with the Pocket Positive.
Colt showed the same stock numbers for the trigger pins.

To change the pin out you'll need a bench press with two support dies, which can be made of hard, tough plastic, brass, or aluminum.
One die is flat and fits on the outside of the frame to prevent bulging or distorting the frame. This die has a hole in the center to pass the frame pin.

The second support die is more complicated. It has to be shaped to fit inside the frame around the pin and also needs a hole to pass the frame pin.

You'll also need several special punches to push the frame pin in and out.

The punch to press the pin out is a solid pin with a contoured end to fit the outside head of the frame pin.

The punch to press the frame pin in is more complicated.
It needs to have a hole drilled in it so the new frame pin will fit up inside the punch, and it needs to bottom out on the end part of the frame pin.
This punch presses on the end of the frame pin.
This punch also insures the frame pin enters the frame perfectly straight, to prevent it going in crooked and enlarging the hole in the frame.

You can make the two press punches on a lathe.
The outside support dies can be made of round plastic, brass, or aluminum bar stock.

The inside support die has to be much more shaped to fit inside the frame correctly.

If needed, you can also make a new trigger frame pin from good drill rod. It needs to be a tight press fit in the frame, and a easy slip fit through the trigger hole.

Do NOT try to change a frame pin with a hammer and punch. This will often distort or bulge the frame, and if the pin goes in even slightly crooked the frame hole will be enlarged, and the trigger will bind on the crooked pin.
 

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I'm not all that up on the older models, but as I recall the frame pins are pressed in.

The Police Positive trigger pin "should" interchange with the Pocket Positive.
Colt showed the same stock numbers for the trigger pins.
...

If needed, you can also make a new trigger frame pin from good drill rod. It needs to be a tight press fit in the frame, and a easy slip fit through the trigger hole.

Do NOT try to change a frame pin with a hammer and punch. This will often distort or bulge the frame, and if the pin goes in even slightly crooked the frame hole will be enlarged, and the trigger will bind on the crooked pin.
I'm not familiar with how Colts are, but I recently had to have a trigger stud replaced on a S&W Model 29 (not uncommon on older 29s). With the Smith, the trigger studs are two diameters with the larger diameter where it inserts into the frame, are the Colt studs the same diameter for the full length? Also with a S&W for a "proper" repair it's definitely a factory job.

Best regards,
 

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I'm not familiar with how Colts are, but I recently had to have a trigger stud replaced on a S&W Model 29 (not uncommon on older 29s). With the Smith, the trigger studs are two diameters with the larger diameter where it inserts into the frame, are the Colt studs the same diameter for the full length? Also with a S&W for a "proper" repair it's definitely a factory job.

Best regards,
Basically the same. The pin design is different, but the pins are inserted the same way and have a shoulder.
 

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Colt's pins are two diameters, with the smaller end going into the frame.

Older S&W's had threaded pins and screwed in. These are identified by the two slots in the shoulder of the pin for a spanner driver's lugs.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I used a punch and a small and lightweight rubber hammer, just to test how hard it would be. By the first hit the remaining parts of the pin came out, I wasn't really expecting that. Either the pin was really loose or the hole in the frame was already worn out.
 

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Assuming you have an original pin to replace the broken one, I recommend using some Loctite Red (permanent) as insurance if the hole in the frame is slightly enlarged.

You MUST get the new pin in at a perfect 90 degrees, straight up to the frame. If the pin is tilted even slightly you'll have problems with the trigger binding, which will usually cause another broken pin.
You also have to be careful not to distort or bend the pin, or enlarge the head.
Again, I strongly recommend not using a hammer and punch on frame pin work, but in your case you may have no choice.

Also, make sure you use a brass or steel bench block with a hole to pass the pin to back up the frame to prevent bulging or distorting it.
If you use a steel block, cover it with a sheet of paper to protect the finish.
Again, since you may be limited in what you can get or do, at least use a small block of HARD wood with a hole in it to back up the frame.
 
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