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Simple question, just wondering if the trigger can be polished up to be as good as a python? Admittedly I’ve only tried a 2019 pythons trigger and not an older python. The new python trigger feels amazing and even though the trooper is nice, it stacks quite a bit. Completely different internals comparing the trooper and new python and all but it is the same internal a as an old python.

Will the trooper break in with time? I don’t think mine has been shot more than a box or two. Don’t get me wrong, I love my trooper. Just wondering if I should have a gunsmith work the trigger or just shoot it and break it in. Thanks all!
 

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Quick answer...of course it can...I'm assuming you have an original type Trooper and not the later Mark III or Mark V. The Python started out with the same parts...they just received some extra attention in fitting. Now...if you mean changing a Trooper .357 into a new 2020 Python...then no. The action...while similar in appearance...is very different and no parts I'm aware of are interchangeable.

There are things that can bring your Trooper to Python levels of smoothness but it's just as easy to screw it up as well. Leave that to a qualified gunsmith. If you want to try it yourself...get a copy of Jerry Kuhnhausen's book on the Colt DA revolvers...Part One. I wouldn't rely on YouTube for how to do it...far too many ham-handed bubba gunsmiths out there giving instructions on how to ruin your gun.
 

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A top Colt qualified pistolsmith can tune the original Trooper action to Python standards.
In fact, in the late 1960's Pythons were almost impossible to get due to Colt's commitment to Vietnam War production, but for some reason Python barrels were readily available, and new Troopers were still available.

So, a few custom gunsmiths welded up the top-front of the Trooper frame to mate up with a Python barrel, the action was tuned to Python levels, and the gun was given a bright polish Royal Blue type finish.
These are known as "Pooper's" or "Troop-on's". They can be difficult to ID as not being original Pythons.

To get your Trooper tuned to a Python level action, we recommend two top pistolsmiths who are members here. Both are Colt Master pistolsmiths.

Frank Glenn is well known here and offers action tuning. He can do a tune to standard Python levels or a custom tune job that removes the stacking of the Colt action and is better then the standard Python........

Frank Glenn-Glenn Custom Complete Gunsmithing Service Glendale AZ

Lee Specklin of Spartan Firearms was trained at the Colt factory by legendary Colt gunsmith Don Tedford.
I suspect he too can do some serious Python level tuning...........

https://bpczubak.wixsite.com/spartanfc
 

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I have a 1950's Official Police that has a nice smooth action;
I also have an Official Police .22 that has a real nice smooth action;
and while not Trooper they share the same lockwork as the Trooper and Python.
 

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I have a 1962 Official Police and sold a Trooper from the same year...each had the same assembler's mark. Whoever the assembler was knew his stuff as both had awesome, smooth actions. Not just Pythons came from the factory with excellent actions.
 

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What dfariswheel said...

I'll just add. If your Trooper is a Mk III, the action can be made pretty darned sweet on those. My old boss (Bill Davis of PPC revolver fame) once built a "Mk III Python" by screwing a 6" Python barrel on to a Mk III frame. He then handed it to me and asked me to do an action job on the Mk III action. Back then there was no Wolf springs, so you had to work with what you had. I cleaned up the ejector star to make it turn easier and interface with the hand/pawl better. Clipped some coils off the mainspring, and then spent a couple of hours re-forming the trigger return spring...that took some time. Nothing needed to be done to the hammer & trigger as they are Sintered. This means they come out dimensionally perfect, and the mating surfaces very smooth. Sintered parts have very shallow case hardening, so not a great idea to take a stone to them anyhow; but they just don't need it. When all was done, it would give ANY PPC tuned S&W a run for its money... Was better than ANY factory Python, and damn near as good as when Bill tuned a Python.

So the Mk III can be made great, but you have to find a gunsmith who is willing to do it right (honestly, it's really not that hard).
 

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I only have one Python, a 4in made in 1975. I also have my dad's 1966 Trooper, which he carried as a duty gun for a short time. The Trooper has a slightly smoother action. Since my dad bought the Trooper new and it's never left the family, I know the action was never tuned. I think time period of manufacture has a lot to do with it.
 
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