Colt Forum banner

1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
41 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I can use some advice folks.
When I cock my Trooper single action one out of six chambers "sticks" just a bit before allowing the cocking stroke to begin.(the same chamber each time) Not a lot of effort, but enough to make it noticeable.
The double action stroke does not seem to have any hesitation in any chamber that I can notice.
I am used to the feel of S&W's, Colts are a whole new world to me.
Is this cause for concern? (the "stick, not the feel of S&W's haha /forums/images/graemlins/blush.gif)
And again, it takes just a "little" more thumb pressure to get that pesky one in motion. Have not had to resort to a big rock or the like to fix it. /forums/images/graemlins/confused.gif

Thanks for your help.

Steve
 

·
*** ColtForum MVP ***
Joined
·
14,906 Posts
Obviously, you have a problem with that chamber OR, the lug on the ejector.

A ejector lug problem or a locking notch problem can cause the action to have a "hard spot".

When the gun is cocked, the locking bolt may fail to retract enough BEFORE the cylinder begins to rotate.
The cylinder trying to rotate while still partially locked causes a "catch" or "hard spot" in the pull, and will damage the cylinder locking notch.

Do a bolt unlock test on ALL six chambers:

Open the cylinder and look at the locking bolt in the bottom, of the frame window.

SLOWLY cock the hammer while closely watching the locking bolt.

The bolt MUST begin to move the INSTANT the hammer starts to move back.
There should be NO (ZERO) movement possible of the hammer before the bolt also begins to move.

It should retract until it reaches the bottom of it's movement, then it should pop back up with a clean "snap".
It should not have any mushy or hesitant movement, and should not creep back up. It should pop up cleanly.

Next, close the cylinder.

SLOWLY cock the hammer while watching the bolt.
As the hammer comes back, the bolt MUST move clear of the cylinder locking notch, BEFORE the cylinder starts to rotate.

With a little practice, you'll be able to actually feel when the hand contacts the ejector and starts to rotate the cylinder.

Do this test on all six chambers.

If one chamber is having a problem, you'll need to have a qualified Colt gunsmith like the Colt factory, or Pittsburgh Handgun Headquarters repair it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25 Posts
I'm not Colt expert but the symptons you decribe seems to be ratchet/hand related....

I had probably the "same" problem with the S&W 686. It turned out that two ratchets were "damaged". The hand needed some effort to pass the burrs and gave an increase in trigger pressure. A qualified gunsmith can address this problem pretty quick. Problem was that in DA it gave flyers due to the increased trigger pressure needed to overcome the resistance. SA was not a problem for bullseye shooting though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
41 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Thank you both VERY MUCH /forums/images/graemlins/smile.gif
I will get the Trooper out of the safe and give it a good look after a little more coffee.
Would like to have my eyes open first. LOL
It's O.K. if I have to send the trooper back to Colt. It fits me like a glove. VERY, VERY glad I purchased it.

Steve
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top