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Discussion Starter #1
I'm lusting after an old Trooper and might be able to buy for perhaps $320. It has the transfer bar ignition method, no firing pin on hammer and it sure is not the same action as my old Dick Special. But the screw on the left side frame, above trigger, is in just the same place as the old DS and the Python. So is this an early version of Mk III lockwork, but not labelled MK III? Or an interim version, using transfer bar but not Mk III lockwork?

You see, I want to follow the very good advice of dfariswheel in checking the timing, but don't know if I should use the method for "old" or "new" Colts. The bolt seems to definitely pop up before the cylinder finishes rotating, which I think is OK for "old" and not good for "new".

Bart Noir
Yes, lusting seems to describe it.

[This message has been edited by Bart Noir (edited 08-25-2004).]
 

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I suspect you have an old model Trooper with the firing pin mounted in the frame.

Early .38 and all .22 original Trooper's had the firing pin mounted on the hammer.

Later .38 and all .357 original Troopers had the firing pin mounted in the frame, like the Python.

These original Troopers do not have a transfer-bar action.
Only the later Trooper Mark III has an actual transfer-bar ignition system.

The original Trooper has the same frame and action as the Python, a tapered round barrel, and a fully exposed ejector rod.

The Trooper Mark III is prominently marked as a Mark III, and has a heavy lugged and ribbed barrel with a fully shrouded ejector rod.

So, if your revolver is marked Trooper, has a exposed ejector rod, and a firing pin in the frame, it's a later production original Trooper.

In this case, use the instructions for the older Colt's.

To ID a true transfer-bar Colt, look between the hammer and the firing pin. There will be a wide, flat plate-like lever, that rises up OVER the firing pin as the hammer comes back.
This lever is large and very noticeable.

The older Colt action has a hammer BLOCKING action.
In this design, there is a much smaller "L" shaped lever farther down in the frame that rises as the hammer comes back.

This safety-block system is used on BOTH the hammer mounted firing pin guns like the Official Police, and the later frame mounted firing pin guns like the late Trooper and Python.

In these guns, the lever DOES NOT cover the firing pin or the firing pin recess in the frame.
It's a much smaller lever, and somewhat difficult to notice if you don't know what to look for.

The old safety-block system is designed to PREVENT the hammer from firing the gun, by blocking it from moving forward unless the trigger is pulled.

The newer transfer-bar system is designed to PERMIT the hammer to fire the gun, by transferring the hammer strike to the firing pin.


As for "transition" or "early" model Trooper Mark III's: There ARE no transition models or models marked other than Mark III or Mark V.
The original Trooper and the Mark III are completely, totally different guns, with little in common other than the Colt name.

There were no "Mark II's", nor any Mark III's marked just "Trooper".
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thaks for the info. It is most certainly the first model Trooper and I prefer the looks over any that followed. Although the King Cobra is nice. So if this gun can be this nice just from being shot, no wonder people rave about the Python with its hand fitting.

Might go back and make an offer. If I buy it, will be asking what to do to remove a little rust patch.

Bart Noir
Thanks again, D'wheel, for sharing all your smarts.
 

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Bart,
If you like the looks of that Trooper and admire handfitting then spend some time looking for a "Three Fifty Seven". It will look exactly like that Trooper, have a hand tuned action, and chambered in .357mag.
The stocks are wrong on this pic, but I have corrected that.

a 1954 (first year) model
 
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