Colt Forum banner

41 - 47 of 47 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,665 Posts
Boge mentioned the Hide Park shootout aka the "Newton General Massacre", Aug 20 1871. The bad blood didn't end till a couple of years later claiming 2 more victims.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,752 Posts
...As far as Indians go you couldn't get any stupider than the worst casting of all time, Audrey Hepburn as an Indian in "The Unforgiven". Raised by white homesteaders on the Texas plains and she still somehow had a Briitsh sounding accent...
Yet, despite that glaring casting error I always liked that movie as it portrayed the attitude of the settlers toward the Indians in an historically correct light. I also enjoyed the weaponry as they used real Sharps conversion carbines in the final shootout and Audy Murphy, in another scene, uttered the word "rimfire" when asking for cartridges. A nice little touch. :p

...and The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford. Somewhat hokey, but pretty good western feel to both.
I forgot about that one. I have the DVD. I love that movie as it portrays Jesse James as he surely was: a psychopathic killer and thief. The dialogue was superb.

I was lucky enough to be an extra on the western film Culpepper Cattle Company. Had a great time with a bunch of unknown "character" actors that everyone has seen in many films but nobody knows their names. I'm probably biased in my thoughts but to me it was a realistic portrayal of cowboys and cattle drives. And the best part, plenty of gunplay!
Another decent Revisionist Western, The Great Northfield Minnesota Raid, featured the late Luke Askew & Wayne Sutherlin who were also in The Culpepper Cattle Company. The latter was a good movie as well for the times. The character actors made it even better.

FWIW, I always thought they killed Bo Hopkins off too soon in The Wild Bunch. I have always liked him in every movie he was in.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
193 Posts
I go through these sorts of gymnastics in my head on an almost daily basis.
Watching a movie supposes that a person can suspend reality in the name
of entertainment and thats to the good. Noone really believes that Rick represented
an authentic saloon owner in WW II Casablanca, but gawd-help the guy who ever
tries to remake that movie. They took a stab at re-doing SAHARA but Belushi
was never going to beat Bogie in that one either.

That said, I don't think anyone would mistake Big John's character for an authentic
frontier deputy Marshall. As (Steven) Speilberg mentioned, the key to a good movie
"is a story well told". IMHO I think Big John told a better story..... which happened to have
an Old West theme or setting.

Lately I have become a lot more choosey about what I watch such that having seen the
D-Day landing scene in "Saving Private Ryan" I am no longer able to watch "The Longest Day".
Don't ask me to choose between "Tombstone" and the Wyatt Earp biography with Kevin Costner
in the lead role. But both have ruined me for reruns of the 1950-s TV series with Hugh O'Brien.
The same happened to me regarding both the TV series and movie, "Broken Arrow" after
watching "Ulzana's Raid". Not sure where I would slip in "Valdez is Coming" but I think it deserves a mention.
Sorta in the same vein with what "The Out-law Josey Wales" did for me.

Currently movies seem to be shifting to a larger World audience who don't care if a guy's equipment is period-correct.
All the same, I have been waiting for an authentic movie on the Commanche predations of the ACW and post-ACW
period.Not sure how they could ever get some of that stuff on the screen, but I would definitely pay to
watch a job well done if they did. Hollywood seems to be getting the "grittiness" of the times down in "Hell On Wheels"
and "Deadwood" but then slipped quite a bit with "Wild Bill".

Just my two cents; yer mileage may vary........

Best Wishes,

Bruce
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Really? I found it quite authentic. Bridges portrayed what is historically known to be the type of character most US Marsharls were in the day: borderline criminals. Thus the catch phrase, "It takes one to catch one..." or words to that affect. while I have always been a John Wayne fan, Bridges not ony got into the character, but brought it to life as a believeable, if reprehensible, US MArshal of the times. The rest of the cast supported him to the Nth degree. Hardly a "silly" effort. The first issue of TG was far from authentic but "fun" to watch. I found the authenticity to be the winning aspect second only by the casts' true grasp of their characters and the times they were to have lived in. As far as real or clones for firearms, accuracy of model type is essential and an effort was made to do this. That is not "silly" either, in my opinion. The arms used n the original were not of te time and accuracy really wasnt an issueapprently; but that's k too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
The Lucky Ned Pepper character in the newer version was fantastic down to his rotten teeth and greasy hair. The wooly chaps were spot on for the time as well. Also, I thought that the actor Barry Pepper played him better than Duvall.

That said, John Wayne had some great lines in the first movie such as regarding the "Colts' Draaaaagoooonn". My favorite line was the one regarding the "original" Mexican Bob. Classic. ;)
I Agree.......totally
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,553 Posts
I'll preface this by saying that I believe all movies should be judged individually. I'm not one who will condemn a movie, especially a remake, without watching it with an open mind first. For example, I didn't care much for the original 3:10 to Yuma (don't care for Van Heflin but always liked Glen Ford) but loved the remake and watch it like it's a series.

The original True Grit is one of my all-time favorites. I really wanted to like the remake and loved Jeff Bridges as Wild Bill. I went in with an open mind but it just left me cold. I watched it in theaters and then again last week. I think it had a lot of potential with Bridges as Cogburn, Josh Brolin as Chaney and Barry Pepper as Ned but it just didn't turn out right. I don't care for the girl they cast as Mattie and Matt Damon did a terrible job as The Brushpopper. IMHO, worse than Campbell. The exchange with Stonehill (Strother Martin was great!) in the original was one of my favorite scenes and in the remake, it came off completely flat, as if done in a high school play. It'll probably be a long time and many showings of the original before I watch the remake again.
 
41 - 47 of 47 Posts
Top