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Discussion Starter #1
Was walking around the show after setting up our table on Friday and spotted this 1st Gen on a table with a few other miscellaneous guns. Made in 1927, it doesn't appear to have had much use or been shot much. .45 cal., all matching, but the grips, while Colt, are not original to this gun. Mechanically great, excellent bore, no holster wear, and just a hint of a turn line on the cylinder. The case colors are actually a little brighter than they appear in the photos. I tend to stay away from 1st Gens as I'm not all that familiar with the variations and figured I know just enough to get myself in trouble. But I think I did ok with this one.

Colt 1927 1st Gen R.jpg

Colt 1927 1st Gen L.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I really don't think it has been restored. It shows no signs of buffing, all markings are very crisp, and everything seems correct (to my knowledge, anyway) except for the grips not being original to the gun. But I welcome any comments, assessments, etc.
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
Well this is getting curiouser. I went online to do some comparisons of other Colts of similar vintage, and low and behold, I found MY actual gun! Evidently, it sold recently on Guns International. There is no doubt it is the one I bought at Tulsa this weekend; serial number and all other details match.

https://www.gunsinternational.com/guns-for-sale-online/revolvers/colt-revolvers---single-action-army---1st--gen/1927-vintage-colt-single-action-army--45-l-c--7-1-2-quot--barrel-blue-case-hardened-finish.cfm?gun_id=101272985

The listing has lots of good pics, so perhaps they will help determine whether the gun has been refinished. And I didn't pay anywhere near the selling price for it.
 

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Mid 1929 is when colt started using the "colt single action army" barrel legend. If this gun actually dates to 1927 unless it was actually shipped after mid 1929 and they used the current barrel in use at the time the barrel has been replaced. I see edges that don't match up very well in Antique and Moderns' pictures on the right rear frame to start with. I'll attach a few pictures that show sharp edges that should mate perfectly where metal was removed.

I keep telling my friends that 1st generation single actions must the most fooled with guns out there and that if I didn't have 37 years experience with them I wouldn't buy one on a bet unless I bought it from an upstanding dealer who will back it up all the way.

housing.jpg rear left.jpg rear right top 2.jpg rear right.jpg
 

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I agree with coltsixguns plus, the stamping on the barrel is not as deep as others from that period. The fact that it has replacement grips leads me to believe that it was overhauled at some point. Beautiful gun though and well done.
 

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Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
Colt 1927 1st Gen SN grips.jpg

I did notice the left side barrel stamping was more than just the caliber but wasn't sure when that change was made other than it was some time in the twenties. Like I said, I know enough to get myself in trouble. Here's a pic of the grip frame serial numbers. Aren't they normally on the left side of the TG and BS? Do the numbers themselves look like Colt numbers? I didn't do the white filler; it was already like that.
Ok, did some more checking and found SNs on the right side is correct for a 1927 gun.
 

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Always look on the bright side in these situations ... for one thing, you'r gonna learn a ton about this vintage of 1st generation single actions from the 1920s, and will be in much better shape as a collector in the long run. Besides, it is a beautiful piece, and if you really like it that means a lot. I started out in similar fashion, way back in 1975, when collector knowledge was much less sophisticated than it is today. I purchased a 1903 1st gen in 45 Colt, only to find out it lettered from the factory as a 32-20 or some such caliber that has long since fallen out of popularity. But I only paid 2 or 3 hundred for it, and actually didn't keep it more than maybe a couple of years, but i started my studying up, and that has paid off. We all have to start somewhere, and you have done well, regardless of the purity of this particular single action. Bye the way. I am also from Oklahoma, OKC!
 

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I also found a 1st gen. 1932 Colt SAA at the recent Tulsa Arms Show. I thought I had done my homework but after getting it home and looking at it more closely I could tell it had mix matched parts. (see "need help" thread). I think I'm done trying to buy old used guns. Saved for three years to buy a 1st gen. colt and now I found out my purchase isn't probably worth half what I paid.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Actually, I’m not all that bothered by it. Obviously the barrel is a replacement, no doubt about that. But I’m taking Hurn Fl’s advise and looking on the bright side; given the quality, I think of the reworking as more of a restoration than a refinish. And given what I paid for it I’m not at all unhappy. It IS still a great looking 1st Gen and it will be shot. I’m a Colt accumulator, not a collector and I’m pleased with this gun and I learned from it.

Hey, Dan. I was up in the Lake area last month for my HS reunion in Eldon. You know me a Snake River James from Land Run. And I still shoot a Henry.
 

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I wonder if the wording "fitted with a 7 1/2 barrel" is a clue. Could that be code for "someone put on a 7 1/2 inch barrel"?
Probably not worth getting a letter but I wonder if it would list a different barrel length.
 
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