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There is a newer (Gen III) in a LGS that is marked used. It is obviously well cared for overall, but it does not have a turn line on the cylinder.

I have a first series Ruger Vaquero that I love to shoot, and it has certainly developed a turn line.

Is there something about the way the Colt SAA advances the cylinder that prevents it from getting a line, or does it take more rounds through it to produce one?

Thanks in advance, and pardon my ignorance.
 

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A turn line on the Colt is usually caused by lowering the hammer from half (the loading position) cock. This allows the locking bolt to drop midway on the cylinder between the locking bolt notches. Turning the cylinder to lock it up causes the locking bolt to drag on the cylinder & making the drag marks.
With a Colt & most clones, never lower the hammer from the half cock position, always bring the hammer to full cock, then carefully lower the hammer.

Rugers are timed differently than Colts & a lot of them develop drag marks. The early ones (without the transfer bar) should be handled the same as the Colt. You can try not rotating the cylinder after loading the new ones, but close the loading gate, bring the hammer to full cock & carefully lowering it. If you release the trigger on the new ones after starting to lower the hammer it'll cause the transfer bar to raise & then if you slip, the hammer can't strike the firing pin.
 

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""Is there something about the way the Colt SAA advances the cylinder that prevents it from getting a line?"
Thanks in advance, and pardon my ignorance."

Yes, if timed properly, and operated correctly; the turnline is produced on Colt SA's by not bringing the hammer to full cock before lowering it as Frank explained.
 

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A somewhat delicate way of saying that almost all new model Rugers are poorly timed. :D
Not so. It is the nature of the transfer bar mechanism that prevents the hammer being cocked with the loading gate open. A New Model will almost always develop the turn ring. The Three Screw models, if handled as a Colt Single Action, will not develop this ring.

Bob Wright
 

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The turn line on a Ruger can be lessened some, by closing the loading gate NOT TURNING THE CYLINDER, then cocking the hammer & carefully lowering it. When the hammer starts forward, release the trigger, this will allow the transfer bar to drop down out of battery so if the hammer falls, it won't hit the firing pin.
 

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As Frank said, most SAA's (and replicas) will be properly timed (bolt rises into the leede) and only produce the ring if you lower the hammer from half cock.


Not so. It is the nature of the transfer bar mechanism that prevents the hammer being cocked with the loading gate open. A New Model will almost always develop the turn ring. The Three Screw models, if handled as a Colt Single Action, will not develop this ring.

Bob Wright
New Model Rugers develop the ring because they are designed intentionally with a very early rising bolt. Traditionally, this is what most would consider "poor timing". Ole Bill was more concerned with liability and absolute reliability than turn lines. You can always close the gate with the bolt under a bolt notch but it will still produce a ring due to the early rising bolt.
 
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