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Good Afternoon all! This is my first post here on Colt Forum. I've been lurking, reading, and learning from many of you here for over a year now.

I've always loved the way SAAs looked, and wanted one for a long time. As I quickly learned, finding a new Colt SAA at a LGS is a bit tough -- and I'm not experienced with online sales. I searched for a year or two before settling on an Uberti. Figured I'd rather learn the ins and outs on a less $$ SAA clone anyway. I've enjoyed shooting the Uberti. Out of the blue a month or two back, a contact at LGS called me. He remembered me always asking around about a real Colt SAA, and said he had a new P1850 coming in. Naturally, I ran down and left a deposit. I'm thrilled to be picking it up today. My first Colt revolver...and I'm sure it won't be my last. I definitely caught the fever seeing all the amazing examples posted here.

So this first post comes with a question. My Uberti has a VERY pronounced turn ring, all around the cylinder. I noticed it early on, after firing only around 100 rounds...with maybe an additional 50 dry fires. I knew from reading here at CF never to lower the hammer from anywhere other than full cock. Every time I drew the hammer on the Uberti, it went all the way to full cock before being lowered or fired -- and the hammer has never been lowered from anywhere else. So my question: to the knowledge of you guys here, is there anything else I could be doing wrong that produced the turn line? This Colt is going to be a shooter, and I know it will develop character over time. But I'm asking because I'd rather not needlessly and prematurely ding it up. And if I could be doing something wrong, I'd rather not repeat the same results on the the more $$ Colt.

While I'm here posting: what are your feelings/recommendations on dry firing SAAs.

Thank you in advance for any advice, and for all the great information shared here over the years!
 

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Welcome - I'm honored to respond to your first post on the forum. I have and have owned model P Colts, various Ruger single actions plus many other single actions over the years - a turn line on the cylinder is inevitable. Always lowering the hammer from full-cock only can help, but mostly on genuine Colt revolvers, which were fitted and timed much more carefully than most of the rest (USAA being a notable exception). There are many experts here who specialize in the venerable SAA, and I, like you, look forward to reading their responses.
 

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Your Uberti should not have a turn line unless it is very badly timed for early bolt drop. Is it possible it was "worked over" by a previous owner? Additionally...is the turn ring actually from the bolt, or is it farther forward and actually caused by the bolt spring screw protruding too far through the frame?
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks Jim!

Your Uberti should not have a turn line unless it is very badly timed for early bolt drop. Is it possible it was "worked over" by a previous owner? Additionally...is the turn ring actually from the bolt, or is it farther forward and actually caused by the bolt spring screw protruding too far through the frame?
CP - I'll check tonight when I get home. If I recall correctly though, the turn line is even with the center of the leade (is that the correct term? I mean the short approach ramps to the notches on the cylinder). But I'm thinking your "worked over" theory may be correct. Only now that you mention it...when I bought the Uberti, I do remember the LGS guy saying it was used like new - that the previous owner bought it, sent it away to have a trigger job done to it, and then decided he wasn't in love and .45LC was too expensive. Fired maybe 50 rounds maximum through it. The trigger is excellent. The price was right. When I picked it up, it looked completely unfired. No trace of a turn line or any marks on the finish at all, and no fouling or signs of being fired. The price was low. I doubt they knew of any problems, as it it was in perfect condition and functions perfectly to the untrained observed. But maybe that is the culprit.
 

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Many cylinder rings come from owners sitting around playing with their gun by cocking it to the first or second click and then letting the hammer down. When this is done, the cylinder locking bolt pops back up and drags on the cylinder as the owner rotates the cylinder to a locked position.
The proper method for working the mechanism is to always cock the hammer all the way back before letting it back down. When you do this, you will find that the cylinder locking bolt pops right up into a cylinder stop. No turning is needed and no ring results.
 

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Terry is correct, but that assumes the bolt isn't dragging. That's easy to check. Simply work the action and look under the cylinder to ensure there is clearance between the bolt and cylinder.
 

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If the gun is timed correctly and bolt is not dragging and you always bring the hammer back all the way before dropping it, your turn line will be kept to a minimum, but if you use the firearm, you really can't avoid a turn line, just keep it to a minimum.
As for me, turn lines do not bother me at all and I have both Uberti's and real Colts that all have a turn line to some extent, its a badge of use :)
 

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I’ve been pleasantly surprised at this point in time with my dual cylinder 45 SAA. In 45 ACP its been fired hundreds of times and the only evidence of wear is slightly noticeable in the bolt notches itself and very light at that. I know nothing of this Uberti of which you speak. Pete

 

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New Ubertis typically come very well timed these days. Local gun plumber's work or something else going on I'd guess. These are 44 Specials, new 2 years ago. Both have had a couple 1000 rounds fired. And likely seen more dry firing, than live rounds, while using snap caps.



 

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I have several Uberti's and three Colt's. The only turn lines are on the old Colt's and one of the Uberti's, all of which were present when I bought the revolvers used. As Cozmo said,it's completely avoidable and once you learn how to not do it, it will become second nature.

Cholla
 

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Good Afternoon all! This is my first post here on Colt Forum. I've been lurking, reading, and learning from many of you here for over a year now.

I've always loved the way SAAs looked, and wanted one for a long time. As I quickly learned, finding a new Colt SAA at a LGS is a bit tough -- and I'm not experienced with online sales. I searched for a year or two before settling on an Uberti. Figured I'd rather learn the ins and outs on a less $$ SAA clone anyway. I've enjoyed shooting the Uberti. Out of the blue a month or two back, a contact at LGS called me. He remembered me always asking around about a real Colt SAA, and said he had a new P1850 coming in. Naturally, I ran down and left a deposit. I'm thrilled to be picking it up today. My first Colt revolver...and I'm sure it won't be my last. I definitely caught the fever seeing all the amazing examples posted here.

So this first post comes with a question. My Uberti has a VERY pronounced turn ring, all around the cylinder. I noticed it early on, after firing only around 100 rounds...with maybe an additional 50 dry fires. I knew from reading here at CF never to lower the hammer from anywhere other than full cock. Every time I drew the hammer on the Uberti, it went all the way to full cock before being lowered or fired -- and the hammer has never been lowered from anywhere else. So my question: to the knowledge of you guys here, is there anything else I could be doing wrong that produced the turn line? This Colt is going to be a shooter, and I know it will develop character over time. But I'm asking because I'd rather not needlessly and prematurely ding it up. And if I could be doing something wrong, I'd rather not repeat the same results on the the more $$ Colt.

While I'm here posting: what are your feelings/recommendations on dry firing SAAs.

Thank you in advance for any advice, and for all the great information shared here over the years!
I won't second guess your equipment with out it in hand . Your statement of VERY pronounced turn ring and noticed early on probably doesn't sound like operator error . You are on the right track asking . Good luck .
 

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Every time I drew the hammer on the Uberti, it went all the way to full cock before being lowered or fired -- and the hammer has never been lowered from anywhere else.
Tom, you are doing everything right from my perspective. If your gun has a turn line I suspect your bolt is dropping early or as mentioned previous a trigger guard screw that is too long dragging on the cylinder. Nothing to do about that other than, checking the screws, (cut it off is required) replacing the Uberti parts (which are generally drop in, unlike a Colt) and then buffing out the cylinder and reblueing it. For the $450 a new Uberti costs, it might be a toss up on which is the easier answer there. If the screw is long more than likely someone had the gun apart and put the wrong screw back in the front of the trigger guard.

A decent set of photos of your gun/cylinder/frame/ring mark would tell us all a lot about what is actually going on.

Easy enough to check the bolt drop. Watch from the side as you slowly cock the hammer. The bolt should be popping up in the last bit of the cylinder lead, just prior to dropping into the cylinder lock notch on a Uberti. If the bolt is dropping early on the cylinder lead or worse yet prior to the lead you'll have a cylinder ring in short order.

FWIW I have seen many, many Colts that had bolts dropping early. And very few modern production Ubertis that do. Generally the Ubertis are perfectly timed right out of the box. Of the Colts I own very few have been timed correctly out of the box.
 

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Whatever you end up doing if you're going to dry snap a Colt SAA I would recommend snap caps. I have a couple sets for my guns and have practiced with them hundreds of times over the past year or so. None of my Colts has a drag mark around the cylinder except one that I messed up unintentionally by shooting the wrong caliber bullet in it and it fouled up the action making it difficult to remove the cylinder. I was able to get it apart and cleaned it up but it has a drag mark on part of the cylinder now as a result. Sucks too because this gun has beautiful case colors and it is a 7 1/2" barrel gun. It is a nice pretty shooter though and I don't hesitate to take it to the range. My son and I love shooting this gun so maybe it's not such a bad thing. I find myself hesitant to shoot some of my other Colts simply because they are literally in unfired, unturned condition... this is something I'm working on getting over but it's not easy. ;)
 

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One other thing is when you remove and replace the cylinder for cleaning some use a paper sling to save marking the cylinder.
 

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This topic comes up often here and not all of us land on the same side of the fence. Some folks will tell you that with proper care and operation, your single action can function for generations without developing the faintest hint of a turn line. This may be true but it hasn’t been my experience.
I don’t own nearly as many single actions as some here, but the ones I do own get not only fired, but carried...a lot. All of them exhibit finish loss/wear and most have developed some sort of “turn line” or to be more specific, wear to the cylinder finish that has occurred outside of the notch leads.
No, this isn’t due to improper cycling of the action on my guns. As best I can gather, it’s resulted from debris that sometimes accumulate between the frame and cylinder during extended back country carry. When drawn and fired from the holster, this can sometimes produce finish wear similar to that which results from bolt drag.
Also, routine disassembly, cleaning/smithing and reassembly...sometimes in the field, is bound to contribute to cosmetic deterioration no matter how cautious you are.
Bottom line, you can drag a gun out to the the range hundreds of times before it starts to show its age. But if you intend to REALY use it, that nice shiny finish will begin to take on that “well loved” look in pretty short order. Learn to embrace it! The Colt SAA has served faithfully as a working man’s sidearm for almost 150 years and its still an outstanding choice for those looking for a deadly accurate and reliable revolver capable of taking all the hard use you can throw at it.
 

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454424 said:
I have found that a properly timed gun will have a minimal turn line.......
Agree, and a properly shaped bolt head will make a turn line even less common. The correct bolt shape seems to get missed a lot on 3rd Gen Colts.
 

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One thing I see a lot while watching the loading table at Cowboy Action Shooting matches is Colt or clone owners just love to spin the cylinder. They may or may not have the hammer parked at the loading notch.

One guys has a lot of old Colt SAAs and he treats them like old garden tools. Brings them to the range in ammo cans. He has a homemade gun cart with a box and he puts the Colts in along with everything else and rattles along. He's old enough to know better but he loads 5 and then spins the cylinder. Then rotates to empty chamber is at 12 o'clock. Then lowers the hammer from half cock. I talked with him about his methed and asked him why he didn't load one, skip one, load four. Then full cock and down on empty. He says, "I know. But I'm checking for high primers.". I replied, "The time to check for high primers is at the loading bench.". He really needs to be a Roooger owner.
 
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