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all I can say is WOW...........they do look like they are in great shape. I don't think I could spend that much for a pair of grips.
 

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Weagle99, I was watching that one as well ($630)... Here's my theory...

Bidder "A" really wanted to win these and put their autobid on $625 or so (expecting the bids to peter out at around $250), then Bidder "B" comes along and tries to snipe it at the last second (thinking that even if they auto bid $700, they won't end up with a final bid much over $250) and now they just bought the most expensive Gen III grips on the Net! Just a "theory". I laughed out loud in the middle of Ace hardware when that alert showed up on my phone.
(Edited, After looking closer at the bidding history, this looks like a knock down, drag out bidding war... over a set of $275 grips)

Python grip selling is a fickle buisness, I see really great Gen III grips with nicely figured wood, original screw and lots of pictures go for less than 2 bills, then I see bidding wars erupt over so-so grips with one or two shadowy pics that go for 3 bills.

I had a bet going about how much those Gen I grips would bring and I had them pegged at about $850, looks like I wasn't far off.

Anyone wager to bet if the grip prices will crash like everyone speculates that the python market will?
 

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"over a set of $275 grips"

I would buy Gen 1 grips all day long for $275. Going price the last year have been $400-500. Yes, on occasion someone will run across a set for $275 just like on occasion someone will find a Python for $1000. Better jump on it when you do.
 

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I bought a 1960 6" Python in Australia back in Feb 2013 for less than these grips sold for.
Anyone want to buy some grips from a 1960 Python?
;) <----should "Wink"
 

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What surprises me about the auction referenced immediately above is that the Generation III stocks seem to be the most common, at least in the number up for auction on eBay at any one time. That stands to reason since that style was used for the longest period of time when production was the highest. Sets of Generation III stocks in identical condition sell for far less almost on a daily basis. Strange!

(Apologies to anyone offended by my "delivery.")
 

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What surprises me about the auction referenced immediately above is that the Generation III stocks seem to be the most common, at least in the number up for auction on eBay at any one time. That stands to reason since that style was used for the longest period of time when production was the highest. Sets of Generation III stocks in identical condition sell for far less almost on a daily basis. Strange!

(Apologies to anyone offended by my "delivery.")
Judge, you are correct that Generation III Python Stocks were produced for a longer period of time and are the most common. However, the Generation III Stocks referenced in Post 14 by chosrob, are a variation of Generation III stocks which are very difficult to find in the condition these appear to be in. This variation was produced and fitted on Pythons for about 4 years; 1974 - 1977 and have a larger, and more oval profile than its later cousins. While I have seen, and do own original Pythons produced in later years that were fitted with this "early" variation of Generation III stocks, they are most often found on mid-70s guns. Anyone wishing to correctly outfit his mid-70s Python would try to find a set like this.

To confuse matters a little, I have always been intrigued by the photo of the Python found on page 3 in Colts 1974 Products Catalog, which appears to be fitted with the smaller and more square profile Generation III stocks, which I believe first regularly appeared on Pythons in about late 1977 or early 1978. But, I do not recall seeing a known original 1974 through about mid-1977 Python fitted with these. If someone has such a Python, please let us see it.




1974-1977 Generation III Python Stocks Shown At Left/Above:



1974-1977 Generation III Python Stocks Shown At Left:


*****
 

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I meant to put Gen III vice Gen II, my apologies.

Is there a definitive Colt Python grip ID source? (One that goes further than Gen I, II and III)

I've been taking pictures in my light box of every set of grips that come my way, and saving them for a rainy day. Perhaps I need to start a Grip ID thread and get some help putting dates to the pics...
 

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Oh boy! These darn "new" Colts are too complicated for an old collector! So now we have two known variations of Generation II stocks and two known variations of Generation III stocks!

With apologies for thread drift, how should we name the variations so as to make a clear distinction between the variations? I have used "Generation 2A1" (as in the fashion of "1911" and "1911A1" nomenclature) as a bit of tongue-in-cheek to identify the Generation II stocks with the thumb rest on both panels, as opposed to the first style of Generation II stocks that have the thumb rest only on the left panel. How about some suggestions? I will set out some possibilities for the Generation II variations

Generation II (checkering curving around medallion and thumb rest only on left panel)
Generation 2-R1 or 2R1 (checkering curving around the medallion and a thumb rest only on left panel - R1 = one thumb rest )
Generation II-1 (checkering curving around the medallion and a thumb rest on both panels)
Generation 2A1 (checkering curving around the medallion and a thumb rest on both panels)
Generation 2-1 (checkering curving around the medallion and a thumb rest on both panels)
Generation 2-R2 or 2R2 (checkering curving around the medallion and a thumb rest on both panels - R2 = two thumb rests)

The "2R1" and "2R2" seem more descriptive to me, but not immediately obvious either.

Maybe we should scrap the current "three generation" nomenclature, and expand the generations to five.

Generation I (or 1) Full checkered
Generation II (or 2) checkering curving around medallion and thumb rest only on left panel
Generation III (or 3) checkering curving around medallion and thumb rest on both panels
Generation IV (or 4) straight line checkering and rounded bottom profile
Generation V (or 5) straight line checkering and more squared bottom profile

To me, this last suggestion makes the most sense. Since it is we here in the center of the Colt Universe who dictate the collector terms we actually use, I think we can establish a new nomenclature to better describe Colt Python stocks (and other V-spring models using target stocks) if it brings needed clarity to the issue.

Thoughts?

(Apologies to anyone offended by my "delivery.")
 

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Oh boy - again! I forget the variations on the routing on the back of the first and second generations, and the variation in the medallions on Generation I stocks. So does that add three MORE variations - taking us up to EIGHT (known) variations?


(Apologies to anyone offended by my "delivery.")
 

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Weren't the grips produced and licensed through different company's at different times (or were they all produced at Colt?, or just finished at Colt?), If so, would that be a better identifier?

IE. Company A, Gen II, Thumb Rest Left Panel , 19XX-19XX
Company B, Gen III, 19XX-19XX

Does anyone have any sources for this info?
 
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