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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Since I have alluded to this Artillery Model revolver lately, I thought it appropriate to create a thread about this one. Purchased from saintclair on this forum early last year. In saintclair’s defense, he offered this one to me with nothing undisclosed. We both deemed it worthy of sending to John, and I admittedly paid a little more than I am usually willing to because of its provenance (saintclair ownership) and it looked fairly good from the photographs provided. Terry sent it to John and then to me. I never saw this revolver nor did I know how John rated this particular revolver. I opened the package and the revolver looked more browned in real life than the photographs. Then I opened the letter from John, and, much to my relief, this revolver amazingly came back with a Silver Seal of Approval!

I state that this revolver has an accidental Silver Seal of Approval letter because, had I had it in hand first, I wouldn’t have sent it to John, believing the browning to be the death knell. John usually frowns upon cleaned or browned revolvers.

As with anything, it’s up to the prospective buyer to do their homework, and Terry did not misrepresent this revolver in any manner or form. The outcome, in the end, was favorable, so I can’t complain!

John writes: “The barrel of this revolver appears to have a light brown finish. The frame also appears to have a brownish uneven finish.” Just for the record…


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Since I have alluded to this Artillery Model revolver lately, I thought it appropriate to create a thread about this one. Purchased from saintclair on this forum early last year. In saintclair’s defense, he offered this one to me with nothing undisclosed. We both deemed it worthy of sending to John, and I admittedly paid a little more than I am usually willing to because of its provenance (saintclair ownership) and it looked fairly good from the photographs provided. Terry sent it to John and then to me. I never saw this revolver nor did I know how John rated this particular revolver. I opened the package and the revolver looked more browned in real life than the photographs. Then I opened the letter from John, and, much to my relief, this revolver amazingly came back with a Silver Seal of Approval!

I state that this revolver has an accidental Silver Seal of Approval letter because, had I had it in hand first, I wouldn’t have sent it to John, believing the browning to be the death knell. John usually frowns upon cleaned or browned revolvers.

As with anything, it’s up to the prospective buyer to do their homework, and Terry did not misrepresent this revolver in any manner or form. The outcome, in the end, was favorable, so I can’t complain!

John writes: “The barrel of this revolver appears to have a light brown finish. The frame also appears to have a brownish uneven finish.” Just for the record…


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I read your Kopec letter until it went horizontal on page 3. But so far this seems to be a pretty good letter to me. Returned to the factory twice for overhaul. That doesn't happen very often. No wonder the "A" on the BS is faint.

I am not sure what Kopec is saying about the #3254 cylinder "missing". Missing on his data sheet? Or there was no cylinder in the gun on his data sheet? Or missing in a field report?
 

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After seeing the last page, I still see no real problems. The mainspring has been thinned? Some bumps on the buttstrap? Who cares! How about evaluating every screw for slot damage!

I failed to mention earlier that the 1878 field report from Fort Ellis, WT "missing cylinder pin and screw" is pretty amazing. The govmint trashed most of the Indian War records, according to John Kopec himself.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
After seeing the last page, I still see no real problems. The mainspring has been thinned? Some bumps on the buttstrap? Who cares! How about evaluating every screw for slot damage!

I failed to mention earlier that the 1878 field report from Fort Ellis, WT "missing cylinder pin and screw" is pretty amazing. The govmint trashed most of the Indian War records, according to John Kopec himself.
I’m guessing there really is nothing wrong with this revolver, according to John, except for the browning. I think because of this, it got a Silver Seal of Approval instead of the goose egg, whereas on a more mediocre revolver, once there’s cleaning and browning involved, that’s a big demerit.

I like this revolver, nice early and desirable frame serial number.
 

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Are you going to go through SRS to get the archive info on the gun? I admit I would love to have a gold or silver seal letter I find them to be very inconsistent on how they are awarded. I thought my artillery stood a good chance at one but he said the 1901 grips were wrong for a gun shipped in january of 1902 and they had some fit issue in one plce that looked more like damage or something other then not being correct. It has a good amount of the rebuild finish left.
 

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Very few of the guns the US military used are listed in the archives by number with most of them being nothing more the a serial number in a return pile or something similar. Just testing a random gun will 99.99999 percent of the time produce nothing.

I have run three numbers with them. 2 were misses on National Match 1903s. the guns are both close to other National match rifles and are the real deal but just no mention of them in the archives. The third one is a heavy barrel 1903 target rifle that had a sales record to a man in Denver CO in 1930. With the name and a repair tag on the gun and the name of the person I bought it from I was able to see it had never left the family until I purchased it.

The 4 books are a good place to start. They run about 200 apiece now. They are also available on media for far less. I got the name and address of the purchaser. Some records may just say gun numbers so and so are turned in by the post office on such and such date which may be years later then when the gun entered service. A good hit would be a stolen or lost gun report with date and unit.
 
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Very few of the guns the US military used are listed in the archives by number with most of them being nothing more the a serial number in a return pile or something similar. Just testing a random gun will 99.99999 percent of the time produce nothing.

I have run three numbers with them. 2 were misses on National Match 1903s. the guns are both close to other National match rifles and are the real deal but just no mention of them in the archives. The third one is a heavy barrel 1903 target rifle that had a sales record to a man in Denver CO in 1930. With the name and a repair tag on the gun and the name of the person I bought it from I was able to see it had never left the family until I purchased it.

The 4 books are a good place to start. They run about 200 apiece now. They are also available on media for far less. I got the name and address of the purchaser. Some records may just say gun numbers so and so are turned in by the post office on such and such date which may be years later then when the gun entered service. A good hit would be a stolen or lost gun report with date and unit.
I’ve got the books and so I’ll see if I can’t find serial number 6778 this weekend.
 

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Victorio1sw inspired me to think about doing just this based on his response to Post #7, above. And so I emailed SRS earlier this evening.
It is a rare day when SCS has one of our serial numbers! I have the four books, and so far haven't found any of mine.
 
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