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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Gentlemen:
I recently acquired a Colt US Model 1894 sn
7805 in a strong 85% plus condition.All # matching including the walnut grips, which have the sn written in pencil on the backside.
The weapon has a lanyard loop. Stamped on the bottom of each grip is the RAC inspector mark, but on the left grip, partially covering the RAC,is a stamping of what appears to be crossed 'flags'? Does anyone have any thoughts as to what this mignt mean? Any help would be appreciated.
Thank you so much.
 

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Welcome to the forum,John. Good to see anoother "Maineac"here. Bob Best,who has recently written a book(I keep forgetting to get it!) on these "first swingout cylinder " Colts, is the man to answer your questions about the crossed flags. If the piece had these all over it,and other marks,I would say it was one of the few that we shipped to the Brits in 1940,when they would take anything that shot,due to invasion fear.

Also,the serial number puts it as being made in 1892,as 1894s commence at #11300. This is the number you got on the bottom of the butt,right?

Hope Bob joins in.

Bud
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Bud: Thanks for your reply. It's always nice to meet another Mainer. I thought I saw some ice on the pond this morning!!
The butt of the frames is marked 'US Army Model 1894', the lanyard-loop, then the SN. Nice to hear that it's an earlier production. I'm out of my element here, as it's my first Colt. My collecting tends to be pre-46 German pistols. But if there's one thing I've learned, it's not to let an original condition military pistol in good condition slip thru my fingers. We all have stories of woe about the one's that got away.Does the forum have the capibility for me to post a picture? I'd be happy to post some after work today. Also, are these pistols in 85% and up condition considered scarce? I understand alot of these were posted to the tropics? Thanks for the input. John
 

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<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by John from Maine:

The butt of the frames is marked 'US Army Model 1894', the lanyard-loop, then the SN. Nice to hear that it's an earlier production. I'm out of my element here, as it's my first Colt. My collecting tends to be pre-46 German pistols. John
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Hi John from Maine,
I just saw your question about the Model 1894 Colt revolver... Colt made the Model 1892, Model 1894, Model 1896, Model 1901 and Model 1903 series revolvers for various army contracts. Original production Model 1892, Model 1894 and Model 1896 contract revolvers did NOT have lanyard rings installed by Colt when originally produced. The Model 1901 revolver contract was the first to have lanyard rings installed when built at the request of the army. During the period 1899 to about 1911 the army refurbished and rebuilt alot of the early Colt contract DA revolvers. They installed lanyard rings on the guns that didn't have them. Surviving Model 1892, Model 1894 and Model 1896 revolvers in original condition as built by Colt will not have the lanyard ring. The reason your gun only has the partial four digit serial number on the butt is that when it was refurbished by either Colt or the Army during one of the rebuild programs, it was polished and lost its full serial number. Since the gun has the last four digits of the serial number in other locations on the gun, they only put back the last four digits on the butt. I found many examples of this practice in the Colt shipping records when I was doing research for my book. The Model 1894 revolver's first & second contracts for the army started at 60001 and went thru 67999. (8000 guns) and from 100001 to 110000 (10,000 gun). There were a few misc contracts in the higher number ranges, but none lower than 60001. If your gun has an L.E.B. on the left side it was refurbished again by Remington in 1918 for WW I. About 19000+ guns were redone then. Most went to the navy (NO property marked applied). In 1940 a number of these guns when to England for lend lease. I have never seen crossed flags stamped in the wood butt before, but I guess it's possible. Most of the lend lease guns had " /380" or "38/380" on the frame and English proofs in other places... This is a very brief thumbnail sketch of several chapters on the reworks discussed in my book. Hope that helps... I used to collect P-38s ... Orv Reichert and I had some great times together! Are you a NAPCA member? Take care...Bob Best
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Hello Bob;

Thank you for your generous answers to my questions concerning my Model 1894. I sent you a close-up photo of the "crossed flags" by e-mail this evening but I'm not sure that it went thru. If it didn't get to you, please e-mail me at
[email protected] and I would be glad to attach the photo to my reply.
Thanks again for the help.
Best regards,
John
 

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<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by John from Maine:
Hello Bob;

Thank you for your generous answers to my questions concerning my Model 1894. I sent you a close-up photo of the "crossed flags" by e-mail this evening but I'm not sure that it went thru. If it didn't get to you, please e-mail me at
[email protected] and I would be glad to attach the photo to my reply.
Thanks again for the help.
Best regards,
John
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Hi John,
I did get your email with the photo attached and I sent you a reply... After looking at the photo, I would say that the "crossed flags" stamp is the branch insignia for the U. S. Army Signal Corps... Thanks for sending the photo! Bob Best
 
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