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The Mexican "Cinco Peso" or five peso silver coin is the traditional coin used to make the badges.
My example of the cinco peso coin is silver.
rayb
 

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As I remember the Walker Colt held the title of most powerful handgun until the .357 came along in the 30's. Correct me if I'm wrong. I also understand that they had a nasty flaw with some of the revolvers blowing up from full charges. I wonder if these horse pistols were holstered on the horse? Carrying one around would get pretty heavy after while. I would think the more elegant Patterson would offer more accurate fire while at a dead run on a horse. I understand that the Walker was developed as a replacement for a carbine and pistol, but I wonder what the actual soldiers thought of it.
You are right about the Walker being the most powerful hand gun made until the .357 Magnum came about. They were issued in pairs along with a powder flask and a single cavity bullet mold. The bullet mold made a conical shaped bullet - which caused quite a bit of trouble.
Many of the Texas Rangers were unfamiliar with conical bullets and loaded them into the cylinder up-side down...When that, combined with a 50+ grain powder load, the cylinders blew out. I think this was the cause of most of the Walker failures. Of course, if the Walker failed for some manufacturing fault Colt would have to replace the gun at his expense. Thus, most exploded cylinders were reported as being due to faulty metal!
You are also correct in that Walkers are too heavy to be carried on the hip. The original Walker holsters as issued, were double holsters that were draped over the horses neck in front of the saddle.
 

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I understand that Eli Whitney Jr. was under contract from Colt to produce a few for presentation models. Does anyone know if they were in the same S/N range as regular production?
When Sam Colt got the Government Contract for a Thousand pistols, he had no manufacturing facilities. He was completely out of the gun business.
So, he sub-contracted the manufacture of what was to become known as the Walker Colt to Eli Whitney, Jr. (the son of the inventor of the cotton gin) who had a firearms factory just north of New Haven, Conn. The contract given EW was for 1,100 guns: 1,000 for the Government and 100 for Sam Colt. The Gov't pistols were numbered Company A, B, C, and D,
numbers 1 to 250. The extra 100 guns were serial numbered 1000 to 1100. The next Colt serial number range of 1101 up were for guns made from excess Walker parts and parts made by Colt in Hartford. These guns were used by Colt to replace Walkers that failed in the field. For more info, consult The
Book of Colt Firearms by Wilson.
















b,
 

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Howdy Pards from Deep in the Heart

According to my references Sam Walker was
first exposed to Colt's arms. in the form of the 1839 Colt Paterson
revolving carbine purchased by the US Army for use during
the Seminole war, before he came to Texas in 1842 and joined the Rangers, where he participated in the
Mier Expedition and later participated in the
renown Hayes Big Fight (battle of Walkers Creek) using the
Colt Paterson #5 Revolver. 180 of these Paterson revolvers
were acquired from the 2nd Texas Navy after Ranger Cap. Jack Hayes after the Navy ordered
the Paterson revolvers along with 180 Paterson carbines
in 1839.
It is intetesting to note that various books tell of the Rangers having multiple Patersons with spare charged and capped
cylinders at the ready for use in sction. When Walker joined the US Mounted
Regiment in Port Isabel in 1846, he drew 32 Paterson

revolvers.
When the Walkers finally reached Vera Cruz in the fall
of 1847, then Col. Jack Hayes of the First Mounted
 

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computer stuck while typing above. cont.
.....Col. Hayes of the First Regiment Texas Mounted Volunteers
aka Texas Cavalry or Texas Rangers. At Vera Cruz Hays took possession of 394 (6 were reported stolen) of the first 500
Walkers sent to the US Army from the NY Ordnance stores. At Vergara, Some Rangers grabbed two, some one, some zip.
There were no spare cylinders issued. Lt. Claiborne, Walkers replacement as commanding officer of co. c usmr after his
death at Huamantla picked up the last 100 of the Walkers. The remaining 500 Walkers were held
in Baton Rouge until after the war.
 

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Walkers are indeed rather heavy for a belt holster. It didnt seem to bother ol Gus. I use a double cross draw
shoulder rig with my 70'S Armi San Marco Walker with cylinder in the white and Colt markings on the left side and my 90's
Pietta engraved Cavalry Le Mat on the right with a pistol lanyard. Fully charged they almost balance me out....almost.
 

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tyyvt

texasman and any other Texican pards:
Maybe we should think about taking a field trip
to Kendall Co. south of Sisterdale where the farm road out there, which pretty much
follows the route of the old Pinta Trail, crosses
the Guadalupe, which supposedly is very close to where Hayes'
Big Fight took place. With the rains we're having
maybe some relics have been unearthed. Know any landowners
out that way that would let us poke around?
Btw, I went to Dallas checked the courthouse and talked
with some oldtimers in their 90s from the family (Im 65). I found an old copy of his will where my ggggpaw asked upon his death that his Walker from the Mexican war be buried with him. Whether or not his request was fulfilled will likely never be known.
One of these oldtimers thinks that that there is another copy of his journal somewhere, dictated before he died, where he
he details his association with Jack Hayes before and during the Mexican War, and afterwards when they both shared the southern wagon trail from Texas to California, his service with the CSA, and early cattle drives to Sedalia after the ACW. As mentioned previously on this forum I am working on getting a legible copy to edit and self publish.
 

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Can't believe nobody has mention John Coffee "Jack" Hays' Enchanted Rock fight in 1841 where he fought off a large number of Comanches with his two Colt Paterson 5 shooters - killing between 10-20 warriors.

And there ain't an "e" in Hays.

Just sayin'
 

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My GGG-grandfather was there, Joel W. Robison, a Texas Ranger & probably used the Paterson. Something of a notable in/after the Battle of San Jacinto 1836, being captor of Santa Ana, President of Mexico, taking him up on his horse, riding double, & delivering him to Sam Houston. He was rewarded by being promoted to First Lieutenant in the Texas Rangers. Painting in TX capitol building in Austin (huge maybe 12x20') shows Santa Ana, #1, standing before Houston, # 28, who had received a leg wound in the battle. Background, hoseback, #18, is Joel W. Robison.



Strange thing ---- my G-father was a kind of protege' of Grandpa Robison as was I as my G-father's only grandson & had heard the Santa Ana story many times but not about Grandpa Robison as a Texas Ranger. Ran on to mention of it somewhere & checked with Texas Ranger Archives in Waco & was referred to the book Savage Frontier Vol I. In it I found five entries of Joel W. Robison's involvement in battles, etc., 1835-1836.

It is worth noting that the Rangers were active in 1835 before independence from Mexico in 1836.

Savage Frontier, by Moore, in 3 massive volumes is basically Texas history from 1833 on, heavily 'people oriented' with pages of alpha index, Vol I has over 330 pages. Highly recommended.
 

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Discussion Starter · #35 ·
In one book Hays was remembered as sitting up on Enchanted Rock the night before and I think it was his Indian friend that over heard Jack cleaning his Paterson and made the remake something like talking to his Colts, "I may need You tomorrow bad".
I often wondow what ever happen to the old rusty Paterson that was found in a field in the 1950s near Haper Texas. Lonnie Parker who used to work at Moody Aircraft showed it to Me once in the late 1960s. Texas Paterson still loaded.
 

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Do any of y'all remember the pair of Patersons (Texas-size with loading levers) that used to be on display at the University of Texas Memorial Museum? Those had to be worth a not so small fortune.

They had a nice general collection of antique firearms from wheelocks up to Winchester leverguns. Unfortunately they closed the exhibit and supposedly were going to return the guns to whomever had donated them.

I wonder if they were able to do so, as most of those guns had been on display for at least 50 years.

Never saw anything about that on any local media or the internet. Found out about the change from a security guard when we went for a visit several years ago. Guess the university got all pc about "evil" guns on campus. lol
 

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I had totally forgotten about the Texas Memorial Museum collection of arms. There were some fabulous old guns there on display.
Also it is well documented that Hays had obtained the Rangers Patersons from the
Texas Navy who had ordered them, as well as Paterson revolving rifles and carbines, in 1839. One of these longarms of
.525 cal was recently put up for sale from the original Texas Navy shipment. I have been doing some research regarding whether any of these
Colt Paterson Texas Navy longarms were used by the Rangers during that period.
It is known that Samuel Walkers Company of Ranger volunteers was issued 32 Colt Paterson revolvers at Port Isabel in April 1846 from US Army ordnance stores before he became a Captain in the US Army Mounted Rifles. The USMR and Rangers accompanied Taylors infantry and artillery units into Mexico and took part in numerous battles including I believe Palo Alto, Resaca de Palma, and
of course Monterey. It is interesting to note that Samuel Chamberlains watercolor, of that period drawn while he was with the USMR in Mexico, entitled "Texas Rangers
in Combat in the Bishops Palace" clearly shows one Texas Ranger dressed in buckskins and red shirt brandishing s revolver...a Paterson, perhaps?.
The Rangers and USMR didnt get their Whitneyville Walkers until a year later after they were shipped from Army Ordnance to Vera Cruz. Walker unfotunately never lived to see his Co. C USMR equipped with the
 

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cntd.....Walkers. Even then, Walkers replacement as commanding officer of Co. C USMR received only 100 Walkers. Most Walkers had been issued weeks earlier to Hays' Rangers at Vergara. The remaining 500 military marked Walkers remained in the Baton Rouge armory
until after the war. So there were never more than about 500 Walkers (6 were reported stolen between Vera Cruz and Vergara) issued and likely many fewer older Paterson used in the war despite the fact that Chamberlains memoirs "My Confession" mentions the use of revolvers many times while he was with Co. E of the First Reg. USMR in General Wools army. While he did take part in the battle of Buena Vista this stiil before Walkers were available. Perhaps he had acquired s coveted Paterson from one of his Ranger pards, whom accompanied Wools army from Bexar into Mexico.
 

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To Texas Man, Armybrat and any other Central Texican pards:
How about lets get together one weekend to shoot our replica Colt Paterson and Whitneyville Walker wheelguns.
 
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