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This is the barrel from s/n no. 9753x that my dad brought home from WWII. He was on the USS Lexington and a pilot friend gave it to him before shipping state side. It has been arsenal rebuilt with misc parts but was wondering what the story is on the barrel. Here are a couple pics"







 

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The barrel is Colt-made sometime between serial numbers 712350-933000, indicating Government production order. The "G" mark continued through May, 1943, until commercial production ended (and everything was Government production). Still, some appeared occasionally until they were used up. Some were observed as late as late-1945. Yours was probably part of a batch shipped to one of the rebuilding arsenals.

Information from Clawson.

Buck
 

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There were two variations of the G marked COLT .45 AUTO barrels, and that is the second variation or "Large G" as it is known. They were used beginning at about serial number 790000 to 890000. For a short period of time the large G was accompanied by a N or F in the same area.

The barrels were also issued as replacement barrels, and could have been installed in your pistol at any time after their manufacture.

The barrel on the left is the "Small G", "Large G" in the middle, and on the right the S marked barrel transferred from commercial (Government Model) production.

 

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That's interesting. All of the ones I have seen from that time frame with the markings on the lower left side like that have also had a "P" stamped on the left lug. I learn something new every day.
 

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Vettepartz,surely you know by now that when JohnnyP speaks you will always learn something! I'm nearing 70 years old and can't remember what I read last week I don't know how JohnnyP does it but, between him and Scott Gahimer they pretty well cover all the bases. Nick
 

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Vettepartz,surely you know by now that when JohnnyP speaks you will always learn something! I'm nearing 70 years old and can't remember what I read last week I don't know how JohnnyP does it but, between him and Scott Gahimer they pretty well cover all the bases. Nick
I wish I could have had Johnny with me last weekend when I saw a lettered 1940 M1911A1 U.S. Army. The frame had the GSR marking and the serial number matched the letter and I believe the stocks were original but then again when it comes to the military models and all the markings to deem it correct I'm lost in the ozone. A letter tells where it shipped but one can't determine authenticity of all the parts unless they know their stuff on those, which I don't. It had a price tag of $6500 and was in incredible condition but there again, what exactly does one look for. It had a polished slide and frame with the parkerized topstrap and bottom and back of the frame so that kinda threw me. Sorry to get off topic on that but Johnny and Scott are the go to guys on these military 1911's.....
 

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The acceptance mark is CSR for Major Charles S. Reed. If plastic the stocks would have been Coltrock which look like the early hollowback Coltwood, but have no mold numbers on the back. The Coltrock proved to be too brittle, and Colt went back to the full checkered wood again until the 727000 serial number range where the Coltwood was then used.

The most important thing to check is whether the slide is serial numbered to the receiver. The slide serial number is found under the firing pin retaining plate.

From your description the finish was not correct. The areas you describe as Parkerized were actually sandblasted and then blued. This was not done on the military pistols.

This is a 1940 CSR accepted Colt 1911A1.

 

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A set of Coltwood small ring hollow back stocks, showing the mold number. The molds were made in pairs and numbered to each other, but no attempt was made to keep the matching mold numbers together. The early Coltwood large ring stocks were also hollow back, but quickly transitioned into the reinforcing ribs.

At first glance the stocks look much like Keyes, but the ring on the Colts is normally flush with or slightly below the surface of the stock where the ring on the Keyes stocks are raised slightly.

 

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The acceptance mark is CSR for Major Charles S. Reed. If plastic the stocks would have been Coltrock which look like the early hollowback Coltwood, but have no mold numbers on the back. The Coltrock proved to be too brittle, and Colt went back to the full checkered wood again until the 727000 serial number range where the Coltwood was then used.

The most important thing to check is whether the slide is serial numbered to the receiver. The slide serial number is found under the firing pin retaining plate.

From your description the finish was not correct. The areas you describe as Parkerized were actually sandblasted and then blued. This was not done on the military pistols.

This is a 1940 CSR accepted Colt 1911A1.

The markings are correct the S/N was No719796 but the frame finish resembles my Series 70 GM, the stock panels look correct on the one I saw. I did snap 2 quick cell pics so I'd remember the pistol. I recalled correctly that the bottom part of the frame had the finish you described as being blasted then blued. SO...throws a flag up for me. Sorry for the drift on this thread. The gentleman did say the barrel was G marked but obviously, since I was only looking, I couldn't have him break her down to check. This is what this forum is all about. Someone who may have been taken in by the letter and condition may have bit on a pistol seemingly incorrect. Thanks Johnny...and again sorry for the thread drift but I did mention the G barrel :)
 
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