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In the early years of my cop career it was a real financial struggle to support a family and pay the basic bills. Like most other young cops of that time period (1971-1975) I worked every part time job that I could manage to scarf up to assist our very modest family budget. During these years I managed to pull together enough money to purchase my first .357 for duty use. Mr. Bill Ruger, of Ruger Firearms, had guys like me in mind when he designed and produced his Security-Six .357. It had just come out and I managed to purchase one of the first blue steel 4-inch 150-series Security-Six Models. I later added Herrett Shooting Star Grips to accent the grip and improve the looks. Those Herretts were/are beautiful grips and I carried my Ruger on-duty fitted out with those Shooting Stars. The Security-Six is one rough and tumble six-gun, perfectly suited for cop work and was priced within the reach of the poorest of rookie cops, like I was! There was absolutely no money, then, for a off-duty snubbie for me so I compromised and started using my "beloved" Official Police for those chores. I removed the Herrett Shooting Star Grips that I had previously put on it for the same reasons as I did for the Security-Six and put the small walnut Colt Service Grips back on to reduce the grip size. For off-duty purposes the small service grips were better suited for the shoulder holster I had and with a loose fitting coat on it wasn't too bad a fit. I shortly replaced the shoulder holster with a homemade inside-the-pants holster I jury-rigged for carrying my Colt off-duty. The shoulder holster would have been perfect had I ever made it to plain clothes duty but alas, my forte was in patrol and in uniform.

Recently Doug.38 had a post on the shoulder holster for his Official Police and his well-written piece brought back a flood of great memories, a nostalgia assault big-time for me. My Official Police was my go everywhere do everything sixgun in those wonderful years of my youth. I wanted a Python about as bad as any young cop could want but had too many obligations to take care of ahead of a "want" for David. I later obtained my prize when those obligations grew up and moved away and my better-half and accountant gave her permission. By the time I got my Python my knowledge in firearms had improved to the point that I came to realize my old friend and partner, my OP, was the "best" I had ever had as a service revolver. It is so much more than Sergeant Abney's service revolver! My OP is a symbolic representation of my career, the long years of public service to man, having a .38 six-gun that required the "best" in gunsmithing craftsmanship to make. Steadfastly staying with my Colt in the face of adversity from well-meaning, but totally unknowing, superiors who were hell-bent on getting an old mans sixgun out of his duty holster for something polymer made. The many years of firearms practice was to reap me a harvest later when qualification scores, obtained with my Colt, took away most concerns from these people-in-authority. Later, I was to find out that there was a major-boss with soft spot for an old cop he knew as a kid and later, when he himself was a cop, saw this seasoned veteran out-shoot other officers at the range with that "same" Colt that some of his colleagues wanted to take away. He knew he loved that Colt and was skilled with it and permitted him to carry-on with it. For the nay-sayers, the sun came up the next morning and the sun set that afternoon, the same time. The sky did not fall and the old cop still has his Colt, and his, much appreciated, friend in a high place. Thank you my friends and sorry for the length and my obvious short-comings.
David
 

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Good story! Here's one from a gentleman that's working at our crew's office. I found out he used to be a Sheriff Deputy in Texas. I ask him what kind of gun he carried for duty. Ruger Service Six .357 Magnum. Like myself, he said he prefers revolvers over semi automatics. Particuarly the .357 Magnum. I mentioned "if I'm in a situation where I think I need 15 rounds, I don't want a handgun, I want a rifle.) At that point he told me that around the time they started trying to push semi-automatics and/or making sure everybody carries a gun that shoots the same ammo he went to a session discussing these things. The officer in charge of the meeting was trying to stress "everybody needs to carry the same thing." Upon this deputy (along with other men from his county) inquired: "Why?" The officer in charge of the meeting said; "Suppose you've got a .357 Magnum and you're partner has a .44 Magnum. He runs out of ammo. You won't be able to give him any ammo to use." The deputy replied to the meeting head, "He's got 6 rounds in his gun, 12 in his speedloader pouch, if he can't handle things after 18 rounds then he's got getting any of my ammo." LOL!!!!
 

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Perhaps this is a little "wandering" from the track but the comments about ,"if he can't handle things after 18 rounds", brought a tear to my good eye and great memories of the best man I ever knew. He was my maternal grandfather. "Papa was a railroad "trouble shooter" for the Eastern Seaboard Railroad for the last 25 years of his 48 years with that R.R.. in the mid '60s I was a Cpt. in the Army. Papa carried a 4 & 3/4" .45 Colt SAA all the years he worked , and I was trying to convince him that he needed to retire the ol' thumbuster and replace it with a .45 auto. My major point was the auto was so much faster to reload than the SAA. In the wisdom borne of his many years, he looked me straight in the eye and said," son, if you can't end a gunfight in 5 rounds you better be putting your butt behind something that stops bullets!" He further opined that if I survived I probably ought to consider some other less stressful employment! About 6 weeks later he called and asked if I could find him some new grips. He was broken hearted because he had broken one of his original grips.[The Colt was made in 1898 and he bought it used in 1913]I rewarded his wisdom with a set of custom ivory grips! I put a grip frame of mine on his gun so he could continue to use his while his new grips were being fitted.He refused the loan of one of my SAAs 'cause he said he had had his pistol as long as he had had my Grandmother and he wasn't about to swap now! Now, I got tears in both eyes and the only known cure is to go down to the safe and haul out Papas old gun and fondle it for a while. After Papa passed I used to shoot it pretty regularly with factory loads in spite of its' age, but now it deserves its' retirement and I don't shoot it anymore.Thanks for the memories, Nick
 

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I am known as the "Dinosaur" of our range because a wheelgun is always in my holster.When I teach the monthly Pistol Safety Course there will always be a student extolling the virtues of capacity and the quicker reloading of "Tactical Tupperware".I tell people up front that I am a Revolver Guy and tell them if a situation can't be handled with 5 or 6 rounds of 38 +P and a tactical reload you don't need a semi-auto You need a SWAT Team. I also tell them if you can pick up a Double Action Revolver and shoot it well you can shoot ANYTHING well.When you see a LEO with a sixgun you know two things instantly,first he/she knows how to use it and second they will hit what they fire at.Wear your sixgun with PRIDE, Thank You for your service,and STAY SAFE..........Mike
 

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On a lower level my story is the same. By lower I mean I wasnt a cop but was a lockheed guard and that was/is a huge department. When I started in 1965 we carried 4" offical polices with the service stocks. I checked the numbers and I belive all them dated the very early 1950s, probley issued when korean war started. As time passed we got ruger speed sixs in stainless steel and then s&w`s 4" 586`s. I retired in 2,000 and dont know if they went to autos or not. We also had a few old dick specials for the captains and pregnant women guards but I only seen them carried a few times. I mostly stayed with the OP`s when I could. I found the larger 586`s and the rugers a little heavier to carry. Actualy aainst company rules I carried my own trooper a lot. I put service grips on it and unless you looked hard no one seemed to notice the rear target sight untill one knowledgable gun rat pointed it out to my captain friend. Of course I think he already noticed but had left me alone anyway. He threw his hands up and walked off and said I see nothing!. I decided then to quit the practice to keep my captain friend out of trouble in case the rat ran with it higher. Anyway most of my 35 years thre I packed a colt OP. The company got rid of most the colts but kept a couple and I used to think they were just for me as I liked them, had the most whiskers and most the younger guys wanted to carry the newer stuff.
 

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I do love the Official Police. It is a simple revolver. But when you look more closer you see the nice serrated topstrap the cool roal blue on the hammer and not to forgett the supurb workmanship on this good revolver. Even in this time I would not think twice to grab it to rescue me. This is my 1939 made example with a Webley MK IV wich also served that time.
Aldo this one is made in 1951 and was in use by the Dutch Police. I love old revolvers.
 
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