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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a relative who may sell me her father's WWII 45 which I have not seen. I am assuming it is a 1911A1 probably Ithaca or Remington Rand (guessing that Colts are less common). What is a fair price for GI 1911A1 in good but not outstanding condition? Is a Colt manufactured 1911A1 worth more? Did the Army actually let officers keep their pistols when they retired?
 

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Kinda boils down to condition, originality and condition once again,

No - Officers could not keep their issued piece, but they could be purchased if they did the required paperwork - few did.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Dogface ---This is one of those instances where whenever she decides to show it to me, I have to have some idea what to offer. I can only calibrate my expectations on hypotheticals. My expectation is that it is either an as issued in WWII GI 45 with about 50% original finish or an arsenal refinish that is fresher and might appeal to a guy who has to buy it. Of course, it may have suffered during many years of storage but I am not speculating that far in my question. Does this help?
 

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Just explain that to be fair to both her and yourself you need to first see the pistol to give you the chance to check market prices for the pistol depending on condition and maker. It may be an arsenal rebuild, or a nice US&S. $750 - $7500.

Colt produced almost twice as many 1911A1 pistols as Ithaca.
 

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$1,000 is probably a reasonable price for one in average condition. The price could go up quickly depending on originality and condition.

Of course if she tries sell it to the local gun shop they'd probably offer closer to $500. If she wants to get top dollar she'd have to put some work into selling it. If she's not interested in going through that whole process offering some where in between those 2 figures is probably a good solution.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks Reddog--- This is good information. I am sure she is not going to a local gun shop. She tried to give the pistols to her sons, but they did not want them as they had children in their houses. The second pistol is her grandfather's WWI side arm, which is unfortunately a revolver rather than a 1911 auto. Too bad it would be too late for a Colt SAA which is a strong interest of mine. What revolver would have been a WWI service pistol?
 

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There are so many variables in your inquiry that no conjecture can be made with any assurance. The grandfather's revolver for example could be anything from a 1917 backwards to the SAA depending on what opportunity and chance served him. If he was a senior officer with clout no one would challenge him on this point. Actually the same goes for her father, the Colt Auto could have been issued to him in 1935 as a Captain and he managed to carry it through the war. Either could have been private purchases.

If you do get either you should really work with her to put together any pertinent paperwork of her father and gf.

Unless there is a constraint with going to her it would be best to make a trip there with at least a Blue Book of Gun Values and make a full assessment of models and condition while she is digging out copies of their military records and maybe that box with their DSC's and other medals (just joking sort of) and try to offer her as close to top dollar as is reasonable and prudent.
 

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PLB;2394497. What revolver would have been a WWI service pistol?[/QUOTE said:
It also could be a Colt New Army in 38 Colt, many of them were refinished by Remington for WWI issue.
 

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It also could be a Colt New Army in 38 Colt, many of them were refinished by Remington for WWI issue.
Yes. My own grandfather was issued one of these during WW1 and brought it home. But it wasn't refinished. Even 60 years later and stored in a holster for all those years it looked brand-new when I found it in a trunk in our attic.
 

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$1,000 is probably a reasonable price for one in average condition. The price could go up quickly depending on originality and condition.

Of course if she tries sell it to the local gun shop they'd probably offer closer to $500. If she wants to get top dollar she'd have to put some work into selling it. If she's not interested in going through that whole process offering some where in between those 2 figures is probably a good solution.
Pure speculation without seeing it.
 

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well the best advice i can give is being honest and telling her with out seeing it....there is no way to give a honest answer...tell her u will be more than fair and give her a fair price that both she and u can live with....without more info...all conjecture....i am sure we can help give u a accurate price once we know more and u can show her that too...God Bless,John
 

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She tried to give the pistols to her sons, but they did not want them as they had children in their houses.
I just don't get some people. That sounds like EXACTLY the reason you'd want a beautiful piece of our country's history in your home. :rolleyes:

I've got two grandchildren both younger than 6 mo right now, but when they're old enough I guarantee they're going to be exposed to guns, and know about the sacrifices and hardships our country has gone through so that they could be free.

OP, I hope you get it. Sorry I haven't got anything to contribute but a rant.
 

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I only have a few of the old 1911s and 1911A1s, so I defer to the experts here. Having said that, these guns will be all over the place price wise. As everybody else said, condition is the issue. I will just add that they seem to be going up steadily in value. I've seen Colts in mediocre condition going for 2k, and quickly.
 

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I just don't get some people. That sounds like EXACTLY the reason you'd want a beautiful piece of our country's history in your home. :rolleyes:

I've got two grandchildren both younger than 6 mo right now, but when they're old enough I guarantee they're going to be exposed to guns, and know about the sacrifices and hardships our country has gone through so that they could be free.

OP, I hope you get it. Sorry I haven't got anything to contribute but a rant.
I've purchased a few firearms from people in the same situation and wondered about their thought process. There are so many ways to make a firearm inaccessible/unusable it is ridiculous. Buy a safe, don't have any ammo in the house, remove the firing pin, keep the gun in field stripped condition, get a gun lock, etc.
 

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If a relative offers me an item, that was refused by other relatives before me, my thought is they're wanting to give me a good deal. Friends and family are there to give each other good deals, not to be a store trying to make maximum profit. Sounds like she wants to give you a good price, otherwise she'd be looking to auction houses or learning about Gunbroker. Ask her what she wants for it, after you see it. She may say a very low price. Then you can decide if it's too low.

But some relatives think "hey, I've got a treasure here....Fred likes treasure....he'll pay me TOP DOLLAR I bet!!" I don't play that game, there are millions of 1911s out there for high retail. Years ago a relative got a Nikon camera, but never used it. She couldn't figure it out, then the shutter started sticking or something. Flash forward 20 years, and I got back into photography. I asked if she'd give me the camera, sitting in the bottom of her closet all those decades. This being when film had died, and it was worth about $20. I tried offering a fair price. "I'm not giving anything away...that camera was expensive when we bought it....it's a NIKON...blah...." I said, "no problem, keep it." It depends on the motivation of the relative. This is a chance to get one better priced.
 

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As has been said, without images or at least accurate discriptions it's a crap shoot. Could be a roached-out Frankengun at $300.00 or a Singer, NAA or SA NRA gun in which case the price of poker will go up dramatically.
 
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