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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Anyone know the current market value of my Colt. I looked at GB, prices are all over the map. Debating selling or trading it. Thanks, Brian
 

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Hi. I recently acquired one (NIB) for $1,500, which was one of the better prices I've seen. $1,800 is probably about right; however, they are becoming more and more collectible, so you may want to consider holding onto it for a while. If you decide to trade or sell, you might want to try for a solid $2,000.
 

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Brian...no disrespect intended towards your gun....everything is worth what someone will pay you for it ...so best of luck if you decide to sell.

My point is that you can actually buy a REAL Carbonia blue gun for less than that....what am I missing here?
 

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What you are missing is the O1911 and the O1918 are reproductions of WWI guns that Colt released approximately 4000 of several years back. They have become quite collectable. It is what it is. A o1918 just sold on GB for $2375.
 

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What you are missing is the O1911 and the O1918 are reproductions of WWI guns that Colt released approximately 4000 of several years back. They have become quite collectable. It is what it is. A o1918 just sold on GB for $2375.
Thanks Hooked...I'm quite familiar with what they are and what people are paying for them....my point being ...as you said...they are reproductions. Lots of things sell on GB for way more than they are worth.
 

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I would MUCH rather pay 2375 for an original M1911 than foolishly pay 2375 for a repro.
 

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I would MUCH rather pay 2375 for an original M1911 than foolishly pay 2375 for a repro.
Some people would like to own a representation of what a NIB 1911 would look like, which of course, can't be accomplished with an original for $2,375. I respect your opinion. It's all a matter of personal taste and preference.
 

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All a matter of personal taste and desire. I do not think that a 4,000 production run is particularly rare but a lot of time demand is greater even if the item is not rare. It's worth whatever the buyer is willing to pay to scratch their itch
 

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My 01918 with ivory grips just sits on the dresser... gives me a smile everytime I see it...
 
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I see both sides of this argument. I am really not a collector, I like to shoot all my firearms. I'm a bit on the fence with this 1911 for a few reasons. The reason I bought the gun in the first place was because I wanted to shoot a WWI pistol and I couldn't find a shooter locally. Didn't feel comfortable buying over the internet without actually handling the gun. This O1911 just fell into my hands at a local shop and for $1000, I thought, why not. I get to shoot a WWI Colt 1911 but don't have to worry about the integrity of the metal as I would on an original model. Now, with the prices around $1800-$2000, I was considering selling it and buying a Special Combat or similar. I have only shot 75-100 rounds thru the WMK, hammer bite is an issue but the gun is beautiful and I'm not sure I can part with it. Thanks for all the responses. Brian
 

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This is not a Military model but it is the real deal as far as Carbonia Blue is concerned...which was my point.....< $1K

http://www.coltforum.com/forums/colt-semiauto-pistols/66725-my-new-me-1911-commercial.html

But to find these deals, you actually have to leave your computer and get out there and look....like in the old days!
 

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You may be better off with a Commercial Model from the 1920s as T.May mentions. The steel on the Model 1911s wasn't heat treated. If you do buy and shoot a WWI gun, I would use light target loads and only shoot it sparingly. BTW when I quoted $1,800 to $2,000, I assumed a NIB gun. You may be looking at a little less; however, if your gun shows no real wear you can probably still come close to the $1,800 if you list it for auction on Gun Broker.
 

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This is not a Military model but it is the real deal as far as Carbonia Blue is concerned...which was my point.....< $1Khttp://www.coltforum.com/forums/colt-semiauto-pistols/66725-my-new-me-1911-commercial.htmlBut to find these deals, you actually have to leave your computer and get out there and look....like in the old days!
Less than $1,000? I would say that collectors fall into deals like that once in a blue moon. I have a friend who bought a mint Model 1911 about two years ago at a big gun show for $1,800 from a young man who was looking to sell. I doubt anyone will see a deal like that for a long time, unless they're in the gun dealer business. I only mention this because I think it's only fair for brianfede to have a realistic idea of what he may find. If he holds out for a gorgeous Commercial Model for $1,000, he may never find what he's looking for.
 

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Thanks Hooked...I'm quite familiar with what they are and what people are paying for them....my point being ...as you said...they are reproductions. Lots of things sell on GB for way more than they are worth.
Let's not get too carried away with condescending usage of words and phrases like "reproduction" and "selling for more than they're worth." First, this repro gun is 100% the genuine thing in that it's a fully functional, well-engineered 1911 built by Colt and in fact probably better built and more durable than the one it's based on. The fact that it's based on an earlier gun in no way diminishes its attraction and value. "Reproduction" in the Colt 01911 and 01918 sense doesn't have the same negative connotation it does in, say, the art world, e.g. a cheap lithograph reproduction of the poker-playing dogs painting or The Man in the Golden Helmet painting. Second, what something sells for is exactly what it's worth to both buyer and seller in an arm's-length transaction, and subjective third party opinions about over-pricing are pretty much meaningless given the fact that these guns are hardly fungible or in great supply; in fact, there are far, far fewer of them than there were Pythons made.
 

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<end thread/> This is one of the most accurate, straight forward posts I have ever read on a forum. We all have opinions, and what we would personally pay for something but that doesn't/shouldn't matter to another buyer.

Let's not get too carried away with disingenuous interpretations of words and phrases like "reproduction" and "selling for more than they're worth." First, this repro gun is 100% the genuine thing in that it's a fully functional, well-engineered 1911 built by Colt and in fact probably better built and more durable than the one it's based on. The fact that it's based on an earlier gun hardly diminishes its attraction and value. That's hardly the thing one can sneerily label a "mere reproduction as you might with respect to a cheap lithograph reproduction of the poker-playing dogs painting (I hesitate to call it art). Second, what something sells for is exactly what it's worth to both buyer and seller in an arm's-length transaction, and subjective third party opinions are pretty much irrelevant.
 
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