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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
While I'm waiting on my first colt python to arrive I have been doing some thinking, this will be a shooter and a life long companion. With that said, how often do you guys run magnum loads through your pythons? I've heard the pythons will go out of time easily but I've also read that shooting .38 in a .357 will leave a carbon ring that leads to an explosion. I generally use a Remington cloth or break free CLP on my guns, will this be ok for a python with some holster wear?Thanks in advance for the replies
 

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I only shoot 357 in my Python and S&W's and lever action. One caliber is easier to buy in bulk and I don't have the carbon ring PIA in anything.
 

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The carbon ring has nothing to do with an explosion.
It just sooner or later makes it hard to chamber the longer .357 rounds.
Denis
 

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As long as you clean your chambers well after using .38's you wont have any problems chambering .357. No explosions either. Any good cleaner like Rem oil or CLP will be fine, I just bought some Eezox to try after seeing it so highly recommended here. I recently bought some disposable Tetra gun oil wipes also, comes in a little plastic container that is easily taken to the range, I found a quick wipe of the exterior after a shooting session while everything is still warm makes a much easier to clean gun than waiting till you get home.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks guys, I have owned .357 revolvers and shot .38 from them but I guess I'm just being a little obsessive. I haven't had a problem with any of my blued guns while using the CLP yet so ill just proceed as normal.
 

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I seldom shoot .357s in my guns. I practice and play mostly with warm reloaded .38s. Carry with .357s if I am carrying it for protection. Actualy the best way to go would be to reload .357 cases just to a slightly lower level but I happen to have thousands of .38 cases and not that many .357s. No problem, just clean the chambers once in awhile. Why shake any gun up with hot loads if you dont need them hot? Not many experianced shooters / reloaders will strictly shoot full level hot loads in their .44 mags either. For most people we can get by with 38 specials in our .357s 98% of the time and the same for .44 specials in the .44 mags.
 

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I've heard the pythons will go out of time easily but I've also read....
HUH????!!!!???? OMG I better check the internet to see if this is true...... Seriously? Ok, let's do a poll of people that shoot 1000's of rounds through their Pythons and find out how many are easily out of time and junk. Yes, they're finely tuned actions that if you take care of properly and don't abuse will outlast you and probably your kids.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I posted the question here because I wanted feedback from actual users instead of the gunshop commandos that apparently owned one 30 years ago and threw them out of time. I know they require a little more care than a cheaper mass produced model so I wanted to ensure I knew the proper care that should be taken.
 

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you'll be just fine, as noted above, and I too shot mainly 38 specials in all my guns....gotta clean them chambers GOOD...as for the "explosions" you maybe referring to what at one time was called "detonation" and was happening with Bullseye powder. 2.5 grain, with 148 gr. wadcutter bullets seemed the culprit at the time, way it was explained to us way back by one of the engineers, is with so light a load, ( little powder in the case) if the powder burned out of sequence??? ( like back to front, build up pressure) and it burned across, in other words across the top all at ONE time, it actually "detonated" instead of burning at a high rate of speed........?? made sense to me, and saw it all too often in the shop, sent a few back for repairs, and or replacement.........
oh yes, of course you get the rocket guys who want to launch their 'projectiles so may run up a load BIG TIME either on purpose ( or sometimes by 'accident') :rolleyes:
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I think it was a gunshop employee who told me to be careful of shooting .38 because the shorter case leaves the ring and causes the longer .357 case to be tighter in the chamber. I usually run a dry bore snake right after shooting while its still hot through the chambers and barrel, will this be enough to clean the ring? I also have a lead remover device for my .44 and I can always get a .357 attachment for it. I used to use hoppes #9 in my barrels but I've found the dry bore snake does a pretty good job by itself
 

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To protect your Python, CLP Breakfree is an excellent product. It not only prevent rust, it also removes the oxidation you get from blued finishes that dull the bluing. Simply put a few drops of CLP on a patch and very gently wipe the metal. The CLP will protect the gun and clean off the oxidation and old dirt. If you have an older gun you may notice after the first use of CLP and a soak of a few days, the patch will have light brown stains. This is the dirt and oxidized bluing coming off. The bluing will usually look noticeably brighter.
Another excellent method is waxing the metal with Renaissance Museum wax and a microfiber cloth.
Truth is, most any care you give it will protect it.

Silicone cloths are also good, but don't keep using them after you start noticing they're getting dirty. Grit embeds in the cloth and can scratch the metal.
I personally used to buy cotton flannel cloth by the yard at fabric stores, cut it into cloths, then spray them dripping wet with auto store silicone to make my own.
When they got dirty, I just pitched them and made another.
These days, a large micro fiber cloth is even better, and those you just wash from time to time and re-spray.

To prevent build up of lead, carbon, or copper fouling in chambers, it's no more complicated than buying a few bronze chamber brushes from Brownell's.
These are not only over-sized, they're made of extra stiff bristles.
Usually one or two passes through will clean all fouling out, will do so fast, and without harm to the chamber.
This is far better then other methods like using a standard larger caliber bore brush, using a brush with a drill, using some sort of polish, or soaking for hours or days, etc.

BRONZE RIFLE/PISTOL CHAMBER BRUSHES | Brownells

For some good info on the "delicate" Colt action, read what Colt gunsmith Grant Cunningham has to say:

Is the Colt Python "delicate"? | Revolvers, Personal opinions, Gunsmithing | GrantCunningham.com

Last, "detonation" of cartridges.
This one has been pretty well shot down.
The story was that very light loads with very low bulk powders like Bullseye could allow the primer to flash over the powder and ignite it at the front of the case. Supposedly this caused the case to explode.

The NRA Tech Staff and the prestigious HP White Labs both did extensive independent tests and neither were able to even induce a "detonation".
HP White went so far as to insert an igniter through holes in a case to ignite the powder at the front of the case or on top of the powder.
They both found that under no circumstance could they induce a detonation, and their findings were that what was actually happening was that hand loaders were accidentally double or even triple charging cases.
With very powerful, low bulk powders this is easy to do, and as usual, most reloaders will not admit that they screwed up.
They both found that no matter what they did, under laboratory conditions they were unable to duplicate a detonation of a light loaded cartridge.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thanks DFW, you've answered many of my questions over the years and I appreciate yours and all forum members wealth of knowledge. I do have some chamber brushes but I haven't used them since I started using the boresnakes but ill dig them out soon
 

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You will not wear out or get a "chamber ring" in the cylinder by shooting 38 specials. You will get powder/lead build up that makes it hard to chamber .357 cartridges if the chambers are not clean after shooting many 38 special rounds. Usually for me good old Hoppes 9 on a patch dissolves the build-up, although a brass brush insures the build-up is removed. The old chamber ring issue started way back when 22 ammo was still corrosive and people would shoot 22 shorts (cheaper) without cleaning the barrel. The pitting or finally a "ring" just forward of the 22 short cartridge in the chamber would allow the 22 long or LR case to swell and then be hard to extract.
 

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I shoot ordinary .357s in mine. I have a S&W 66 that is not a helluva lot of fun with full power loads, so I prefer the .38 specials in that.
You should have no problem with your revolver when you fire .38s in it. Be sure you get the chambers cleaned out good after.
The only difficulty anyone might encounter would be stiff chambering of the .357s in a cruddy chamber used for .38s.
Go ahead and blast away.
 

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While I'm waiting on my first colt python to arrive I have been doing some thinking, this will be a shooter and a life long companion. With that said, how often do you guys run magnum loads through your pythons? I've heard the pythons will go out of time easily but I've also read that shooting .38 in a .357 will leave a carbon ring that leads to an explosion. I generally use a Remington cloth or break free CLP on my guns, will this be ok for a python with some holster wear?Thanks in advance for the replies
There are excellent responses to your question in this thread and many of them match my experience.

First, me: I have 6 pythons of various vintage, blue and stainless, 4" and 6" barrels. One of them I call my "$300 Special" because that is what I paid for it at a gun store. It looked as though someone had tossed it in the exposed bed of a rusty pickup and dragged it around for a few years. But the bore was excellent and lockup was perfect. It's an "E" and seems to date to 1975. I've fired it a lot with mostly magnum rounds until I settled on a +P loading in magnum shells.
A couple of the others have about three-to-one magnum to .38 Special.

Magnum loads: The only thing that has suffered for shooting magnum loads through a 4" barrel is my hands. None of the six has exhibited any timing problem. I've heard a few people say they had forcing cone wear, but none of mine show any.
The question is what you want to do with your gun. Which barrel length are you getting? If you want to use the shorter barrel version for self-defense carry, I recommend modern .38-Special +P. Much easier on your hands and they still hit like hammers. As to "carbon rings," balderdash. As others say, you MAY get some stickyness if you shoot a lot of .38s and don't brush the chambers. Bronze brush or Bore Snake will take care of it unless you've let it simmer for years and cause corrosion. I use 44-Special shells with John Taffin's loads in my .44-Magnum-rated guns and have never seen a problem.
You mention holster wear. In my experience a properly fit holster will cause wear.
CLP is, as its name implies, for cleaning and lubing and I have used it for decades. I've used it on every blue and stainless gun I've ever owned. You can stick with it.
 
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