Colt Forum banner
1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
50 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
In an (Name unmnetionable) On-line auction I saw a 1904 DREADNAUGHT 22LR revolver that has a cyclinder release that looks a lot like a Colt's.

Was the Dreadnaught a Colt product? Never heard of one.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,483 Posts
Sounds like one of the "fancy" names for Colt & S&W clones made in Spain or Belgium during this time,usually with less than quality steel,or assembly! Bud
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
907 Posts
The H.M.S. Dreadnought was a WW1 era British battleship, part of the Grand Fleet. If I remember correctly, it was the largest of it's type when built, supposedly unsinkable, and well covered in the press of the day. The name would have been recognized by everyone, and would have no doubt helped the sales of a revolver. But it wasn't a Colt.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,277 Posts
Yes and no.

Bit tricky this one but I'll try to explain.

In the prelude to the Great War, both England and Germany were involved in an naval arms race which had it's climax in the launching of HMS Dreadnought in 1906. Since there was only one dreadnought built you can't really speak of a class. However that Dreadnought was followed by 8! classes of other battleships exsisting of 31 battleships which were then all considered as Dreadnoughts. The first HMS dreadnought had a waterdisplacement of 17.900 tons, had a top speed of almost 21 knots and its main armamnt consisted of 10 12 inch guns sitting in 5 twin turrets. The germans of course responded in building 5 classes of "dreadnoughts" consisting of 21 ships of which 2 never were completed.

[This message has been edited by gunsmoke (edited 03-30-2005).]
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
The Dreadnaught, I believe, albeit a new ship was conceptually different from preceding capital ships. All the main armament was in turrets that could be brought to bear on either side. Before then, some of the armament was mounted on the side of the ships.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
267 Posts
The Texas is a Dreadnaught class ship. I remember reading about it when I visited it over by the Houston ship channel. Very interesting tour to go on if you get a chance.

A friend of the family was with us and he served on a sister ship to the Texas in WWII and was given very free acess with the tour guide. Our friend showed us where his bunk was, where his duty station was, all sorts of interesting little details of the ship that even the tour guide did not know about. It really put the guy in perspective to me.

Anyway, the US navy did have some ships in the Dreadnaught class up and past WWII.

------------------
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
53 Posts
To get back to revovlers, I've always been aware of S&W clones from Spain, but I've never heard much about Colt clones from Spain. How many were there? I've not run across S&W clones from Belgium.

In the 1980's or there abouts, Lowe in Germany manufactured a clone of the S&W Russian, but did so under license to S&W. This was a high quality piece. (Never have seen anything but high quality with the Lowe name on it.)
 

·
*** ColtForum MVP ***
Joined
·
15,807 Posts
I've seen a few Colt "Clones" from Spain.

These look very similar to a Colt DA revolver externally, but are usually quite different internally.

You haved to have your gunmaker stuff together to build the old Colt action, and the Spanish just didn't have it.

Many of the pre-WWII Spanish pistols were actually built by families of sheep herders in the winter months.

The family would hand file pistol parts out of scrap metal, then in the Spring they'd sell the parts to an assembler who would assemble and finish a "working" gun.

These were often stamped with lettering that would lead a non-english speaking buyer to think he was getting a real S&W or Colt.

The big market for this junk was South America, especially Argentine and Bolivian cowboys.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Dreadnaught was a ship, a class of ships, and a generic name for all big gun battle ships after it. It was considered a break-through design as it had all Big Gun armament instead of a range of calibres. It also was the start of an arms race. I belive that it was obsolete by the battle of Juttland, and I'm not sure it was there. The formula was 12" guns, 12" armour plate, and 12 knots cruising speed (I'm not as dead sure about the last figure), but it did have turbine engines. One thing you will see on the Dreadnaught are the two side "wing" turrets. These were dropped on later models.

Dwight
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top